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Doctor insights on: What Are The Differences Between A Tia And A Stroke

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What are the differences between a TIA and a stroke?

What are the differences between a TIA and a stroke?

Duration: The main difference is in how long the neurological symptoms last. In a TIA they resolve fairly quickly (<1 day and often in an hour or two). In a stroke they last longer and are often permanent. The fact that the symptoms resolve with a TIA does not mean everything's okay--a TIA can be a serious sign of underlying vascular disease and should be thoroughly evaluated. ...Read more

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Dr. Gutti Rao
398 doctors shared insights

Transient Ischemic Attack (Definition)

Tia (transitory ischemic attack) happens when blood supply to a certain area of the brain gets cut off temporarily. This causes a neurologic deficit - weakness, numbness, visual deficit or difficulty with speech. While TIA usually resolves, it indicates that there is a problem with your heart or blood vessels that can cause ...Read more


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Are strokes or tias caused by vasospasms?

Are strokes or tias caused by vasospasms?

Rare but possible: Vasospasm in the brain occurs when blood and its breakdown products are present in the spinal fluid around blood vessels. The most common reason is rupture of brain aneurysm, but there are other conditions. Vasospasm causes the larger vessels (arteries, arterioles) to clamp down or contrict, thus reducing blood flow. This can cause strokes or tias. ...Read more

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Is it bad if you have blackouts? Are those tias or strokes?

Is it bad if you have blackouts? Are those tias or strokes?

Do NOT ignore: Could be due to blood pressure drop, possibly secondary to a primary cardiac arrhythmia, epileptic seizures, medication reactions, anemias, thyroid problems, and of course tia's and strokes. See your doctor and get this handled! ...Read more

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I heard oranges are good for people at risk for strokes. Are they good for tias too?

I heard oranges are good for people at risk for strokes. Are they good for tias too?

I suppose so: Strokes and tias are, at their underlying cause, basically the same thing. Both involve clots impairing blood flow to brain cells. Tias are just when the clot fortunately dissolves in enough time such that no permanent damage has occurred. Oranges are in general probably good and better than foods with high salt, fat, sugar or cholesterol content. ...Read more

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How do you prevent strokes in someone who is having TIAs but is very active outdoors?

How do you prevent strokes in someone who is having TIAs but is very active outdoors?

Stroke prevention: Optimal stroke prevention depends on minimizing risk factors, whether a person is outdoors or not. If there is no carotid artery disease, then risk factor modification includes keeping a healthy blood pressure, blood sugar, cholesterol, no smoking, and taking special medication if there is a heart rhythm irregularity called atrial fibrillation. ...Read more

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What can be done for stroke prevention for someone who is having tias but is very active outdoors?

What can be done for stroke prevention for someone who is having tias but is very active outdoors?

TIA: Not enough information to even begin... First things first: overweight? High blood pressure? Smoking? High cholesterol? Yourself? Active outdoors doesn't help... If you have high blood pressure and be "active" may actually endanger you (if you have high blood pressure it goes up even higher during exercise). ...Read more

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If a lesion is a scar from a past stroke 6 months to a year ago and foci resolves and appears in new locations would foci likely be from tias?

If a lesion is a scar from a past stroke 6 months to a year ago and foci resolves and appears in new locations would foci likely be from tias?

Scar: Scar if you ment in mri, does not go away. If you do not see it in new mri, it is because it is very small and it might be between MRI "slices." the new foci in your age, would be very unusual to be due to TIA if you do not have risk factors such as diabetes or high blood pressure. A neurologist can work with you to make sure you are not suffering from multiple sclerosis. ...Read more

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Dr. James Wilentz
155 doctors shared insights

Transient Ischemic Attack (Mini Stroke) (Definition)

Transient ischemic attack (TIA), is a condition where a blood vessel in the brain is temporarily blocked by a blood clot, causing neurologic symptoms, such as weakness in an arm or leg, or sensory changes. The symptoms are similar to a stroke, but are temporary, disappearing within minutes after the clot breaks apart. ...Read more