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Doctor insights on: What Are The Best Ways To Prevent Chickenpox

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What are the best ways to prevent chickenpox?

What are the best ways to prevent chickenpox?

Vaccine: This are routine for children, should be offered to adults with no history of chicken pox. Much more serious in adults than children. ...Read more

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Dr. James Ferguson
719 doctors shared insights

Chickenpox (Definition)

Caused by the varicella-zoster virus, chicken pox results in a blister rash that starts on the stomach, back, and face and spreads throughout the entire body. These small itchy blisters eventually scab over. Associated symptoms include itching, fatigue, malaise, and a fever. The most effective method to prevent spreading of the varicella virus is ...Read more


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What can we take to prevent chickenpox?

Vaccine: The varicella vaccine is effective at preventing both chicken pox and shingles. Recent recommendations are to have a second dosage about 5 years from the first. This increases immunity. ...Read more

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If I get chickenpox at this age, can it leave any marks on my skin? And if yes how to prevent or minimize these marks?!

If I get chickenpox at this age, can it leave any marks on my skin? And if yes how to prevent or minimize these marks?!

Sure Can!: Getting the vaccine is the best way to prevent the disease, as well as any potential scarring! If you get disease, keep the skin clean and dry, and treat any evolving surrounding red areas with a topical antibiotic. It's the bacterial infection surrounding ( and complicating) the pox viral infection that tend to cause worse scars. ...Read more

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How to prevent getting chickenpox from an infected person?

How to prevent getting chickenpox from an infected person?

Depends on variables: Most adults had chickenpox in childhood and it may have gone unrecognized. Of those that did not, exposure to a child with wild chickenpox can infect them as easily as any unimmunized child within minutes. Airborne droplets or debris is the source.Blood tests can show an adult that they did have it in the past.If not, vaccination would be a prudent action. ...Read more

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I had been recently in contact with a adult infected with chickenpox . I never had a chickenpox before. Is there any way i can prevent myself from it?

I had been recently in contact with a adult infected with chickenpox . I never had a chickenpox before. Is there any way i can prevent myself from it?

Get vaccinated: It's not too late to get vaccinated against varicella, as post exposure immunization sometimes helps prevent infection or reduce symptoms if administered shortly after exposure. ...Read more

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I had been vaccinated at the age of 2 or so. I never had chickenpox. Will it make me immune from chickenpox for lifetime? Else how could i prevent it?

I had been vaccinated at the age of 2 or so.
I never had chickenpox.
Will it make me immune from chickenpox for lifetime?
Else how could i prevent it?

Mostly yes: It should but no vaccine is 100% protective lifelong. Human immune systems vary and the response/memory wanes over time. You can get a blood test to check your immunity to Varicella. Also, you may still get Shingles later in life due to the waning immunity issue. Shingles is the same virus as Chicken pox. ...Read more

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I am an adult who has never had chickenpox. Is there a vaccine i can get? My neighbor's children recently came down with chickenpox. I'm afraid i might catch it as an adult. What can I do to prevent infection? .

I am an adult who has never had chickenpox. Is there a vaccine i can get? My neighbor's children recently came down with chickenpox. I'm afraid i might catch it as an adult. What can I do to prevent infection?

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The : The following information is taken from the us cdc: varicella (chickenpox) is a highly contagious disease that is very uncomfortable and sometimes serious. The chickenpox vaccine is the best protection against chickenpox. The vaccine is made from weakened varicella virus that produces an immune response in your body that protects you against chickenpox. The chickenpox vaccine was licensed for use in the United States in 1995. Since then, the vaccine has become widely used. Thanks to the chickenpox vaccine, the number of people who get chickenpox each year as well as hospitalizations and deaths from chickenpox have gone down dramatically in the United States. Persons aged >13 years persons aged >13 years without evidence of varicella immunity should receive two 0.5-ml doses of single-antigen varicella vaccine administered subcutaneously, 4--8 weeks apart. If >8 weeks elapse after the first dose, the second dose may be administered without restarting the schedule. Only single-antigen varicella vaccine may be used for vaccination of persons in this age group. Mmrv is not licensed for use among persons aged >13 years. School-aged children, college students, and students in other postsecondary educational institutions all students should be assessed for varicella immunity, and those without evidence of immunity should routinely receive 2 doses of single-antigen varicella vaccine 4--8 weeks apart. The risk for transmission of varicella among school-aged children, college students, and students in other postsecondary educational institutions can be high because of high contact rates. Other adults all healthy adults should be assessed for varicella immunity, and those who do not have evidence of immunity should receive 2 doses of single-antigen varicella vaccine 4--8 weeks apart. Adults who might be at increased risk for exposure or transmission and who do not have evidence of immunity should receive special consideration for vaccination, including 1) hcp, 2) household contacts of immunocompromised persons, 3) persons who live or work in environments in which transmission of VZV is likely (e.g., teachers, day-care employees, residents and staff in institutional settings), 4) persons who live or work in environments in which transmission has been reported (e.g., college students, inmates and staff members of correctional institutions, and military personnel), 5) nonpregnant women of childbearing age, 6) adolescents and adults living in households with children, and 7) international travelers. ...Read more

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How long should I prevent from pregnancy after the chickenpox vaccine injection?

How long should I prevent from pregnancy after the chickenpox vaccine injection?

I month: Cdc recommends waiting 1 month minimum after receiving live vaccine because of the theoretical risk to a fetus. No studies--have ever shown actual harm but cdc feels it prudent to be careful. In women who have had natural infection & fetus developed congenital varicella syndrome, the babies have had serious consequences. If vaccinated & pregnant by accident, baby should be fine but try to avoid. ...Read more