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Doctor insights on: What Are Causes Of Aortic Valve Stenosis

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What are causes of aortic valve stenosis?

What are causes of aortic valve stenosis?

Multiple: Perhaps the most common offending etiology in aortic stenosis in the us is atherosclerosis. Just as this can affect the arteries in the body, it can affect the tissues covering the aortic valve and then the plaque deposition and calcific degeneration of the valve leads to its problems. Rheumatic heart disease, not common in the us, is another common cause in third world countries. ...Read more

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Dr. Jeffrey Wint
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Valve (Definition)

A valve is a structure that regulates the direction of flow. The heart is a special kind of pump. It moves blood by squeezing and relaxing. There are 4 chambers and each chamber has a valve. This keeps blood from moving backwards when the heart squeezes. When a chamber squeezes it lets the blood move forward but when the chamber is relaxed it prevents the blood from ...Read more


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What causes someone to develop aortic valve stenosis ?

Congenital, acquired: Bicuspid aortic valves are an anatomic variant seen in 2% of the population. They are prone to develop aortic stenosis. The more common is degenerative or senile which is seen in the elderly. The cause is likely multifactorial and may share some similarity to atherosclerosis. ...Read more

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Does alcohol cause aortic valve stenosis?

Does alcohol cause aortic valve stenosis?

No: Aortic stenosis is a condition in which the aortic valve of the heart is narrowed and flow out of the left ventricle is restricted. Alcohol is not one of the causes of aortic stenosis. ...Read more

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What is aortic valve stenosis?

What is aortic valve stenosis?

Aortic stenosis: Narrowing of the aortic valve which is located between the left ventricle and the aorta. ...Read more

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What does aortic valve stenosis lead to?

What does aortic valve stenosis lead to?

Aortic stenosis: Aortic stenosis refers to the gradual destruction of the aortic valve. It is a progressive process that eventually leads to shortness of breath and lack of energy with exercise. Untreated it will eventually cause congestive heart failure. ...Read more

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What can be done for severe degenerative aortic valve stenosis?

What can be done for severe degenerative aortic valve stenosis?

Replacement of valve: Surgical replacement of aortic valve is the standard of care. No medicines can relieve the blockage. More recently percutaneous valve replacement has become available for patients who are at a high risk from surgery for aortic valve replacement. This procedure can be performed with a catheter through the groin, but carries its own complicaitons and risks. ...Read more

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I was just diagnosed with aortic valve stenosis. What's my next step?

I was just diagnosed with aortic valve stenosis. What's my next step?

How severe: What is the aortic valve area, your body surface area, aortic valve gradient, tricuspid or bicuspid, if bicuspid what is the diameter of the ascending aorta. Do you have marfan's, ehrles-danlos or collagen disorder. Is there a hypotensive response to excersise. Without all those answers can not advise. ...Read more

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Dr. James Lin
3 doctors shared insights

Aortic Valve (Definition)

The aortic valve is one of 4 valves in the heart, each of which separates 2 cardiac chambers. It opens when blood is actively ejected from the left ventricle into the aorta artery, to be carried to the rest of the body. It then closes firmly to prevent blood from flowing backwards, while it passively continues to flow forward to body's vital organs. When next heartbeat ...Read more


Aorta (Definition)

The aorta is the largest artery in the body, leaving directly from the left ventricle of the heart to supply blood to the entire body. It is made of elastic tissue layers called "intima" and is subject to damage by high blood pressure, smoking, cholesterol, ...Read more