Top
20
Doctor insights on: Wealthy People Who Need Kidney Transplants

Share
1

1
Why are kidney transplants bad?

Why are kidney transplants bad?

They are not: Much better than indefinite hemo-dialysis or peritoneal dialysis ; far better than dying of uremia (kidney failure). Kidney transplants are associated with complications in many cases, but beefits of kidney transplants far outweigh the risks. ...Read more

Dr. Krishna Kumar
3 Doctors shared insights

Transplant (Definition)

In medicine: a transfer from one body or body part to another of an organ (liver, heart, lung, kidney, pancreas bowel) or tissue (hand, face, hair). The immune system fights foreign invaders (like infections) so it will reject transplants from other people (allotransplants) because they look like infections. So transplants usually require drugs to ...Read more


2

2
How are kidney transplants done?

How are kidney transplants done?

Kidney transplant: Once the kidney is removed from the donor eithe living or cadaver, the kidney is placed through a lower abdominal incision iusually into the right side of the pelvis and attached the iliac vein and artery and ureter implanted into the bladder. ...Read more

3

3
How common are kidney transplants?

How common are kidney transplants?

~17, 000 a year in US: In 2013, there were 16, 895 kidney transplants in the U.S. About 11, 000 of them were deceased donor kidney transplants; the rest were living donor transplants. ...Read more

4

4
Why do some people need kidney transplants?

Why do some people need kidney transplants?

ESKD: Patients who end up with end-stage kidney diseases (ESKD) need kidney transplants. Common causes of ESKD in the U.S. include diabetes mellitus, hypertension, polycystic kidney diseases, glomerulonephritis, and toxins/medications. ...Read more

5

5
What is the success rate of kidney transplants?

Well,: Kidney transplant success rates vary greatly across transplant centers. The average 5 year survival rate is 80-90%, . ...Read more

6

6
How old is too old to have a kidney transplanted?

How old is too old to have a kidney transplanted?

No precise age: The question is perhaps best answered when the risks of the procedure outweigh the benefits. This occurs at different ages for different patients. It can be a vexing problem if patients are unrealistic about their rehabilitation potential and their goals. It is not common for a kidney transplant to be done over age 75 but a few are done each year, even for healthy octogenarians. ...Read more

7

7
How dangerous is it to have a kidney transplanted?

How dangerous is it to have a kidney transplanted?

Safer than dialysis: Risk assessment is a major part of the txp team's evaluation process. Only pts who are expected to survive at least 3 years should be transplanted, since that is 1 of the key measures used by the gov't to evaluate txp programs. Prolonged dialysis, however, lowers the chance of doing well as pts age + become sicker. If a pt can't walk 1 block (or equivalent activity) pre-txp, survival is unlikely. ...Read more

8

8
What risks are associated with kidney transplants?

What risks are associated with kidney transplants?

Rejection Infection: After kidney transplantation, the two primary risks are rejection of the organ and infection related to immune suppression medication. There is an ongoing balance between how much your immune system should be suppressed to prevent rejection, but not to allow too many infections to occur. Immune suppression medications can have many side effects such as diabetes, high blood pressure and cholesterol. ...Read more

9

9
Can kidney transplants take place in small children?

Over 40 lbs or so: Fortunately, not many small children develop chronic kidney failure and require transplants. However, once they reach a minimum size of approximately 40 lbs, they are candidates for a transplant. The adult sized kidney is placed in the abdomen (if a woman's belly can stretch to hold a 9 month pregnancy, a child's belly can stretch to hold the kidney). Results are usually excellent. ...Read more

11

11
Are there any other options besides transplanting a kidney?

Dialysis: When the kidneys have failed entirely only dialysis and kidney transplantation are effective for treatment unless the kidneys recover function on their own or with treatment. There are several types of dialysis, but if a patient with irreversible kidney failure is a candidate for transplantation, that is almost always the best therapy for a longer lifespan and better quality of life. ...Read more

12

12
What complications are most common with kidney transplants?

What complications are most common with kidney transplants?

Multiple: Short terms complications are related to surgical or infections. The long term mainly chronic rejection, recurrent disease and malignancy ...Read more

13

13
Can a person have multiple kidney transplants in their life?

Can a person have multiple kidney transplants in their life?

Yes: There are many people who receive their second kidney transplants during their lifetime. I am aware of a couple of patients who received a total of four renal transplants in their lifetimes. ...Read more

15

15
What is the ratio of failed kidney transplants to total kidney transplants?

Less than 10%: The question is about survival, which is usually measured as percentage of surviving (not failed) kidneys transplanted after a time period, usually one year.
Kidney transplant survival after one year is routinely in the 90% range. It depends on the type of kidney transplant (living donor vs deceased donor) the quality of the donor kidney and the health of the transplant recipient. ...Read more

16

16
What causes rejection with kidney transplants?

Transplant rejection: Ideally, transplanted kidneys come from a twin or close relative to minimize rejection. Otherwise, the body does not recognize the transplant as "self" & attacks the "foreigner". Thus the use of immunosuppressant drugs to suppress the recipient's immune system to prevent rejection of the transplanted kidney. ...Read more

17

17
What are the adaptive changes of a transplanted kidney?

What are the adaptive changes of a transplanted kidney?

Responds to demand: The transplanted kidney will respond to the demand placed on it by the recipient. Small kidneys can be transplanted into large persons and the kidney will increase capacity over time to respond to the work load. Similarly, a living donor is left with a single healthy kidney. The remaining kidney adjusts to the increased demand within days. The remaining kidney compensates to other demands also. ...Read more

18

18
What would happen if a transplanted kidney fails / gets rejected by the body?

What would happen if a transplanted kidney fails / gets rejected by the body?

It depends: Sometimes, the patient will need to have the organ removed. This usually occurs if the anti-rejection medications are being reduced or stopped, and the immune system continues to attack the kidney. Signs of this include pain near the transplant and fever; this requires immediate medical attention. In other patients, the failed kidney can remain in the body indefinitely with no problems. ...Read more

19

19
What are tips for a kidney transplantation?

Observe any changes: Best advice. Listen to your transplant team and follow their instructions....Take your medications on time and refill them when needed. Come to regularly scheduled clinic visits and have your screening laboratory tests done when scheduled. Always call your transplant team if you are unsure of an issue or a new symptom develops. ...Read more

20

20
I was wondering what are the procedures (prequiste) to transplant the kidney?

I was wondering what are the procedures (prequiste) to transplant the kidney?

Thorough evaluation: There are no specific procedures; but donor evaluation will include a thorough determination of your current health status, prior history of medical illnesses and surgical procedures, testing of your kidney function, and imaging (x-rays) of the abdomen and kidneys to determine their precise anatomy. In addition, psychosocial evaluation of your reasons to donate and health will be discussed. ...Read more

Kidney (Definition)

The kidneys are paired organs that lie on either side of the vertebral column. Part of their critical functions include the excretion of urine and removal of nitrogenous wastes products from the blood. They regulate acid-base, electrolyte, fluid balance and blood pressure. Through hormonal signals, the kidneys control the ...Read more