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Doctor insights on: Vanishing Twin Syndrome Ultrasound For Pregnancy

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I had slight bleeding but no pain or clots. Was told it was miscarriage could it be possible vanishing twin syndrome?

I had slight bleeding but no pain or clots. Was told it was miscarriage could it be possible vanishing twin syndrome?

Probably not: however, you could ask your doctor to check your serum HCG levels if you wanted to rule this out. ...Read more

Dr. Michael Gabor
2,190 doctors shared insights

Sonogram (Definition)

An ultraound, also known as a sonogram, is a painless and relatively inexpensive imaging test that utilizes sound waves instead of ionizing radiation. There are no side effects. Ultrasound can give us two-dimensional, and in some applications three-dimensional, images of structures and organs in virtually any part of the body. In addition to diagnostic uses, such as evaluating abnormalities in the abdomen, pelvis, and breast, ultrasounds are commonly used to guide needle and catheter placement in a variety of surgical ...Read more


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What are the tests for vanishing twin syndrome?

What are the tests for vanishing twin syndrome?

None.: Vanishing twin syndrome is probably much more common that people think; it results in a singleton pregnancy and current evidence suggests it is rather the norm than the exception. No test can predict this, only serial prenatal sonograms can document it. ...Read more

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What are the symptoms of vanishing twin syndrome and is there a way to predict this condition?

What are the symptoms of vanishing twin syndrome and is there a way to predict this condition?

None.: Vanishing twin syndrome is probably much more common that people think; it results in a singleton pregnancy and current evidence suggests it is rather the norm than the exception. No test can predict this, only serial prenatal sonograms can document it. ...Read more

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What is the treatment for vanishing twin syndrome?

What is the treatment for vanishing twin syndrome?

None.: Vanishing twin syndrome is probably much more common that people think; it results in a singleton pregnancy and current evidence suggests it is rather the norm than the exception. No test can predict this, only serial prenatal sonograms can document it. No specific therapeutic intervention is warranted. ...Read more

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Im 39 & 6 weeks preg. W/ twins. How concerned should I be about vanishing twin syndrome? What should I expect at my visit in 2 weeks. Im really scared

Im 39 & 6 weeks preg. W/ twins. How concerned should I be about vanishing twin syndrome? What should I expect at my visit in 2 weeks. Im really scared

Worrying will not : Help the matter any. Vanishing of one of the twin is being recognized more often due to the common use of ultrasound in early pregnancy. I understand your being concerned, but that will not affect the outcome. Please see this site for information on this topic. http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/271818-overview. ...Read more

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What is vanishing twin syndrome?

Demise of one fetus: Vanishing twin syndrome is the demise of one twin sometime during the pregnancy. One study suggested it occurred about 20-30% of twin pregnancies. Most commonly it occurs early in the pregnancy and generally the remaining fetus has a good outcome. Its' occurrence later in pregnancy can be associated with adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. ...Read more

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Vanishing twin syndrome (lost at 5+ weeks), what is the likelihood of the remaining twin having something wrong with it?

Vanishing twin syndrome (lost at 5+ weeks), what is the likelihood of the remaining twin having something wrong with it?

Increased risk LBW: Compared to singletons, the surviving twin of VTS is at slightly greater risk of premature delivery, low birth weight and, for twin loss after 8 weeks gestation there is an increased risk for cerebral palsy. Loss of a twin at five weeks greatly reduces the risk for the surviving twin to have any adverse consequences. ...Read more

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Dr. Warren Foster
4 doctors shared insights

Pregnancy (Definition)

When your due date arrives, you will be more than ready to have your baby! Most women deliver the baby somewhere between 37 and 42 weeks. According to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, only 5% of babies arrive on the exact due date. Approximately 7% of babies are not delivered by 42 weeks, and when that happens, it is referred to ...Read more


Dr. Adam Lewis
8 doctors shared insights

Vanishing Twin Syndrome (Definition)

Vanishing twin syndrome is a condition where one fetus dies within the uterus and is partially or completely reabsorbed ...Read more