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Doctor insights on: Upper Motor Neuron Lesion

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Why does an upper motor neuron lesion cause a positive babinski sign?

Why does an upper motor neuron lesion cause a positive babinski sign?

Extensor respons: The presence of a Babinski sign suggests an upper motor neuron lesion, although in infants the presence of the dorsiflexion of the great toe with plantar stimulation can be normal. Simplifying, it's thought by some it may be related to the difference between the anatomical flexors behaving differently, more as extensors. Medicine Decoded has a reasonable explanation of this. ...Read more

Neuron (Definition)

A neuron is a specialized cell that conducts impulses within the nervous system. It is made up of a cell body and processes including ...Read more


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How to diagnose upper motor neuron lesion in patient with amputated four limbs?

How to diagnose upper motor neuron lesion in patient with amputated four limbs?

Neurologist: The physical exam findings will be more difficult to see, but a neurologist will be able to examine the patient and might elect to do testing such as an EMG which tests the conduction of the nerves. ...Read more

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What are the symptoms and signs of the upper motor neuron lesion (cortex, internal capsule, brainstem, spinal cord)?

What are the symptoms and signs of the upper motor neuron lesion (cortex, internal capsule, brainstem, spinal cord)?

Variable, but: Typical results of a stroke affecting brainstem and rostral structures, could see focal weakness over unilateral arm and leg, with possible problem with speech. Spinal cord smaller area and maybe both legs and less commonly unilateral arm and leg. ...Read more

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Paralyzis and hyperalgesia in one limb initiated 2 weeks after scoliosis surgery. Sphincter incont Clonus. Spasticity. Upper motor neuron lesion? Why?

Paralyzis and hyperalgesia in one limb initiated 2 weeks after scoliosis surgery. Sphincter incont Clonus. Spasticity. Upper motor neuron lesion? Why?

Postop complication: One has to worry about a delayed postoperative complication-significant!!!! Need to see operating surgeon. Potential causes would be hematoma (blood) compressing spinal cord or even a spinal cord lesion remote from operative site ...Read more

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Paralyzis in one limb initiated 2 weeks post scoliosis surgery. Clonus spasms and dorsal back pain. Upper motor neuron lesion? Why? Mri and CT normal.

Paralyzis in one limb initiated 2 weeks post scoliosis surgery. Clonus spasms and dorsal back pain. Upper motor neuron lesion? Why? Mri and CT normal.

Ct/MRI of what?: Was the "normal" MRI and ct before or after surgery and were those procedures done of the entire spine-including the cervical spine? Highly recommend returning to operating surgeon and neurologist ...Read more

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How does the upper notor neuron lesion cause the babinski sign?

How does the upper notor neuron lesion cause the babinski sign?

Higher brain centers: Babies normally have babinski responses but lose it as they mature. The response remains deep in the brain and spinal cord but is suppressed by the higher brain centers. If the higher brain centers become damaged, these primitive responses return because they are no longer being suppressed. Hope this helps to simplify the prior excellent answer. ...Read more

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What is the different between upper and lower motor neuron lesions?

What is the different between upper and lower motor neuron lesions?

Lesion Localization: The upper motor neurons also called “Cortical Motor Neurons” are located in the motor cortex of the brain. The the spinal motor neurons are the lower motor neurons. Signs of UMN is a stiffness and resistance to movement. Signs of LMN damage include weakness, muscle atrophy.
Hope it helps. ...Read more

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What do neurons do?

What do neurons do?

Neurons transmit sig: Neurons transmits electric. They also process and transmit information between two cells. Or introduce synapses, the specialized sites where neurons send and receive information from other cells, They also allow groups of neurons to coordinate complex processes. Without neurons, central nervous system does not function. Schwann cells lay down myliene around it which protects it and helps in fas ...Read more

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Another name for conecting neurons?

Another name for conecting neurons?

Synapse: The connection between neurons is called a synapse. ...Read more

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Can binural beats regenerate neurons?

Can binural beats regenerate neurons?

Doubt it!: I have not done the "ultimate" research" on this question however I see no reason WHY the sound perception leads to neuron regeneration!!!
Which neurons do you wish to regenerate???
Hope this is helpful
Dr Z ...Read more

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When are expiratory neurons activated?

When are expiratory neurons activated?

Expiratory neurons: When you need to expire as in breathing not dying. Great Wikipeidia question. ...Read more

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What are the different parts of a neuron?

What are the different parts of a neuron?

Neurons: Same as other cells, plus axons & dendrites. ...Read more

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Why are motor neuron diseases so dangerous?

Why are motor neuron diseases so dangerous?

No cure.: There truly is no effective treatment, and often, the bulbar musculature is afflicted causing both swallowing and breathing issues, which promotes early demise. Main issue, in most cases, is the preservation cognitive function, allowing patient to witness the devastation and anticipate problems. (variant associated with front-temporal dementia may be less intense) bad disease. ...Read more

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What is the definition or description of: neuron?

What is the definition or description of: neuron?

Nerve Cell: A neuron is a specialized cell that conducts impulses within the nervous system. It is made up of a cell body and processes including the axon and dendrites. ...Read more

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What are the last stages of motor neurons disease?

Gruesome: Patient needs assistance with nutrition due to inability to swallow, and chokes on secretions, so a peg feeding tube is placed. Cannot breathe so a tracheostomy is employed. Infections overwhelm the system, and diffuse weakness or even paralysis from the muscle atrophy is present. But most patients intact cognitively and appreciate the catastrophe. Rather horrendous situation. ...Read more

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Where are motor neurons found? What exactly do they do?

Where are motor neurons found? What exactly do they do?

Brain & spinal cord: Motor neurons provide connections for motor pathways which eventuate in our ability to move our muscles, walk and balance, and actively physically interact with our environment. This is simplistic as other nerve cells help refine and modulate all of these activities in a balanced fashion. ...Read more

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What would happen if you somehow fused your neurons together?

What would happen if you somehow fused your neurons together?

Are you worried?: The separation of neurons by synapses is what makes it possible for the brain to do what it does, namely, think and control muscles. If you fused them all together your skull would contain a gigantic hard-boiled egg. Why do you ask? Are you afraid that it could happen or has happened to you? ...Read more

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Is neurogenisis possible? If yes how can I grow new neurons?

Not currently: The nerve bodies you have at birth are yours for life. You can regrow nerve channels if they are connected but not the cellular root. There is significant laboratory research underway dealing with this issue to try to encourage nerves to diviide and reproduce but this work has a long way to go. ...Read more

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What are the tests used to diagnose upper motor neuron disorders?

What are the tests used to diagnose upper motor neuron disorders?

Clinical is the best: You've just stated a few hundred different disease processes that involve "UMN disorders." Which one did you have in mind? The best way to a diagnosis is a well trained neurologist who likes to examine their patients, judiciously use tests to help support their clinical thinking or help reorient them if necessary and not make snap decisions. Do you know anybody like that? That's who needs to see U ...Read more

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Can you tell me how information travel between neurons and other cells?

Can you tell me how information travel between neurons and other cells?

Electro-chemical: Neurotransmitters exist at the termination of the axon as it contacts other nerves or muscles. There are excitatory neurotransmitters, and inhibitory. The former glutamine and glycine, the latter norepinephrine, dopamine, serotonin. All exists in a balance, and is fine tuned in normal daily activity. ...Read more

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What are the most reliable tests to establish if you have a neuron disease?

Assume you mean: "motor neuron disease", or als, or lou gehrig disease? Testing includes checking for spinal cord compression, blood studies for muscle disorders, hyperthyroidism, and other metabolic diseases. An EMG study may show characteristic changes, and a muscle biopsy on occasion may be useful. There are many other diseases affecting the nerve cells. Hope the above is what you ask. ...Read more

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What would a neuro look for if nerve cells or neurons were damaged and dying?

A diagnosis: Which would include a history, physical exam, blood tests, and additional testing as indicated. ...Read more

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What type of neuronpathy are there? I have no emotions feelings im positive my neurons are producing very little chemical and electrical changes?

What type of neuronpathy are there? I have no emotions feelings im positive my neurons are producing very little chemical and electrical changes?

See my thots: You could see either a psychiatrist or psychologist, but you are describing emotional changes, which may be consistent with chemical depression. Meds are available which can dramatically help. Get this addressed. ...Read more

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What is motor neuron disease?

Motor neuron disease: Motor neuron disease is a group of poorly understood degenerative conditions of the nervous system. The one known most commonly is amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, better known as lou gehrig's disease. The disease causes the nerves supplying muscles in the spinal cord to die off gradually causing progressive weakness in the limbs and the face including swallowing muscles. There is no cure at this time. ...Read more

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What is motor neuron disease and how is it treated?

See below: Previously termed "lou gehrig's disease", the process destroys motor nerve cells and leads to muscle atrophy weakness, swallowing and breathing difficulties. The sole approved drug is Riluzole which may delay tracheostomy. Treatment is basically symptomatic and supportive, but patients succumb nonetheless. There is no cure. ...Read more

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Do only dopaminergic neurons release dopamine?

Do only dopaminergic neurons release dopamine?

Yes: Yes, only dopaminergic neurons release dopamine, but there are several dopaminergic pathways in the brain. Dopaminergic neurons in midbrain are the main source of Dopamine in the mammalian cns. Losing these is associated with parkinson's disease. Dopamine neurons are involved with voluntary movement and other behavioral processes such as mood, reward, addiction, psychosis, and stress. ...Read more

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Why does polio only target motor neurons?

Why does polio only target motor neurons?

Tropism: Certain infections cause problems in specific parts of the body because there are places for the virus to attach there- this is called "tropism"
I have attached a link that explains this is further detail
https://en. Wikipedia. Org/wiki/Tissue_tropism ...Read more

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What does it mean if polio only targets motor neurons?

What does it mean if polio only targets motor neurons?

Destination: Many germs have specific affinity, or a desire to go certain places. Many fungi can only thrive on your skin surface, some viruses go to your GI tract an cause diarrhea, while some go everywhere like the flu to make you miserable. Polio starts out as a gut virus but it has an affinity for the motor neurons where it does its most damage. Its the way they are. ...Read more

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What cause the impairment of neurons in Parkinson's disease?

What cause the impairment of neurons in Parkinson's disease?

Unknown: In the etiology of this disease toxic substances (like heavy metals, specific chemicals) infectious e.g. Viral) genetic and environmental factors have been implicated but no definite theory exists. ...Read more

Dr. Scott Bolhack
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Wounds (Definition)

Wound = injury to tissue. May include ...Read more