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Doctor insights on: Tumor Necrosis In Sarcoma

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Sarcoma. Any chance that the tumor is malignant?

Sarcoma. Any chance that the tumor is malignant?

Yes, by definition: Sarcoma is the term for malignant tumors of muscle, connective tissue, bone etc. ...Read more

Dr. Shari Jackson
2 Doctors shared insights

Sarcoma (Definition)

By definition, it is malignant (i.e., being locally invasive and at least theoreticlally capable of metastasizing), and arises from / mimics muscle or connective tissue elements that are not marrow or immune / white cells. The sarcomas are a tremendously varied and troublesome family of tumors, though thankfully less common than carcinomas and the leukemia / ...Read more


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Is a sarcoma an fast growing tumor and a carcinoid a slow growing one?

Is a sarcoma an fast growing tumor and a carcinoid a slow growing one?

It is different: Sarcoma is a soft tissue/bone cancer; carcinoid is a neuroendocrine tumor. They both are completely different disease. Soft tissue sarcomas grow at various rates depending on the aggressiveness of the - could be presented with as fast growing tumor or slower growing process. Same thing with carcinoid- it can be presented as a slow growing tumor or more agressive one in high grade carcinoid. ...Read more

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Osteogenic sarcoma and osteosarcoma are the same tumors?

Yes.: The two are synonyms. By definition, it is a sarcoma that produces malignant osteoid (immature bone) that is seen under the microsope. Osteogenic means "producing bone." other bone sarcomas, like ewing's, do not produce osteoid. Most arise in bone, but there are rare soft tissue osteosarcomas (or osteogenic sarcomas, depending on which term you prefer). ...Read more

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Whats' the difference between a tendon sheath tumor and soft tissue sarcoma?

Benign vs malignant: A tendon sheath tumor could be a malignant sarcoma or a benign tumor (by definition not a sarcoma). ...Read more

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I had a sarcoma tumor removed from my left leg 8 months ago and I still have pain why is that?

I had a sarcoma tumor removed from my left leg 8 months ago and I still have pain why is that?

Depends: There are many factors that could be causing pain, including but not limited to where the tumor was, how much was removed, postoperative course, radiation therapy if any, rehab care, and many others. Only your physician can reasonably comment further. ...Read more

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What is the difference between malignant phyllodes tumor and breast sarcoma?

What is the difference between malignant phyllodes tumor and breast sarcoma?

Phyllodes of breast: Sarcoma is a tumor of the supporting tissues wherever it may be located. Phyllodes is a type of sarcoma that is from the breast stroma tissue. ...Read more

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Can you tell me what kind of cancer can you have from a soft tissue mass/tumor in the knee besides sarcoma?

A mass?: The most common knee mass is the familiar baker cyst. Cancer arising in the knee is usually a sarcoma of some sort; osteosarcomas, ewing sarcomas, and pigmented villinodular synovitis are all common here. There are plenty of benign bone and soft tissue tumors here as well. Hoping you get a favorable diagnosis, and best wishes. ...Read more

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I have a Tumor growing out of my joint in my left shoulder iv had a MRI and it's say they can't rule out synovial sarcoma and since the MRI 3 months a?

I have a Tumor growing out of my joint in my left shoulder iv had a MRI and it's say they can't rule out synovial sarcoma and since the MRI 3 months a?

Question?: What is your question here? Have they done a biopsy? I know this is worrisome for you. Remember that you have right as patient to ask and see the MD who ordered the MRI in order to get all questions answered! ...Read more

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My sister has her third brain tumor. Sarcoma! Will the cancer wafer work for her as an aggressive form of chemo? She can't have anymore radiation. What more can we do? This cancer baffles her doctors because it has not been seen on the brain before.

My sister has her third brain tumor. Sarcoma! Will the cancer wafer work for her as an aggressive form of chemo? She can't have anymore radiation. What more can we do? This cancer baffles her doctors because it has not been seen on the brain before.

Clinical trials: This is a very difficult situation. It sounds like she has a recurrence of gliosarcoma. The Gliadel wafer (carmustine) is an option, but there are certainly risks with surgery to implant the wafers. There are new clinical trials for recurrent tumors with vaccines, electric field therapy (novocure), additional chemotherapeutic agents. A lot depends on what has been done so far. Check with your neurooncologist. ...Read more

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Tiny Bump near vessel just under skin in arm, area and vessels clear on MRI & xray. Can MRI miss sarcoma tumor? What else can be if imaging is normal?

Tiny Bump near vessel just under skin in arm, area and vessels clear on MRI & xray. Can MRI miss sarcoma tumor? What else can be if imaging is normal?

Not sarcoma: Sarcoma unusual just under skin. Only such lesion would be leiomyosarcoma arising from venous structure More common would be a small thrombotic site in one of the veins associated with other veins in this region. If site small it would not show up on scans. Rather one could use warm soaks to see if resolution occurs over a few weeks. Otherwise small firm lipoma is the existing lesion. ...Read more

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I had a ct after lump and bruise on foot. It showed ganglion cyst. Can a radiologist tell it is a ganglion and not a tumor or sarcoma from a CT scan?

I had a ct after lump and bruise on foot. It showed ganglion cyst. Can a radiologist tell it is a ganglion and not a tumor or sarcoma from a CT scan?

With contrast, yes.: If the CT was done with contrast, then the radiologist would likely be able to tell the difference between a cyst and a tumor. A ganglion cyst would have negligible enhancing tissue, while a sarcoma would be a solid lesion with significant enhancement. ...Read more

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What is the tumor necrosis factor alpha?

What is the tumor necrosis factor alpha?

Stimulate reaction: Tumor necrosis-alpha, (tnf) also known as cachexin or cachectin is a cytokine mainly secreated by macrophages stimulates the acute phase of inflamation. Tnf regulates the immune cells, performs varieties functions as pyrogen (causing fever), regulates cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis (cell death or suicide), in lipid metabolism, in coagulation of blood etc. ...Read more

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What is human tumor necrosis factor alpha and why is its use?

Stimulate reaction: Tumor necrosis-alpha, (tnf) also known as cachexin or cachectin is a cytokine mainly secreated by macrophages stimulates the acute phase of inflamation. Tnf regulates the immune cells, performs varieties functions as pyrogen (causing fever), regulates cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis (cell death or suicide), in lipid metabolism, in coagulation of blood etc. ...Read more

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What is human tumor necrosis factor alpha? Why is it so painful?

Endogenous pyrogen: In looking for mechanisms for Coleys Toxin as a cancer vaccine, bacterial toxins used were found to release a chemical termed tumor necrosis factor. This was found to be the same as cachexin, or now TNFα It is involved in systemic inflammation and is a member of a group of cytokines that stimulate acute phase reaction. It is produced by macrophages, CD4+ lymphocytes and NK cells. ...Read more

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What is the definition or description of: tumor necrosis factor-alpha?

What is the definition or description of: tumor necrosis factor-alpha?

A cytokine: Tnf Alpha is a protein molecule involved in communication between cells, it is involved in inflammation. The main function is part of the immune system response. It is primarily produced by cells called macrophages but may be produced by many other cells. It causes fever, may induce programmed cell death (apoptosis) and is important in the response to sepsis (via molecules called interleukins). ...Read more

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What can you tell me about the tumor necrosis factor?

Cytokine: Tumor necrosis factor was a cytokine first isolated from macrophages and CD4 cells in response to understanding how Coley's toxin worked. It was felt to be the factor that induced destruction of malignancies but when sequenced proved to be the same molecule as cachexin, a chemical produced by tumor like pancreatic cancer that induced cachexia in patients. ...Read more

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What are those tumor necrosis factor-alpha blockers?

What are those tumor necrosis factor-alpha blockers?

Tnf blocker: Tumor necrosis factor (tnf) promotes the inflammatory response and is increased in autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, crohn's disease, psoriasis and hidradenitis suppurativa. The various tnf blockers help treat these conditions. ...Read more

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How would you describe tumor necrosis factor-alpha blockers?

How would you describe tumor necrosis factor-alpha blockers?

Tumor necrosis: Factor (tnf) promotes the inflammatory response, which in turn causes many of the clinical problems associated with autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis. These disorders are sometimes treated by using a tnf inhibitor. The important side effects that have been most extensively related to tnf blockers include: lymphoma, infections, congestive heart ad others. ...Read more

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What is tumor necrosis factor alpha? It sounds like it makes something die?

What is tumor necrosis factor alpha? It sounds like it makes something die?

Immunology: Tumor necrosis factor Alpha is an inflammatory immune chemical marker that is used in research for new medicines to treat such problems as multiple sclerosis and even alzheimers. Several other chemicals include interleukins and cytokines. The names are catchy, and come from research discoveries, but do not really correlate with survival. ...Read more

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Extensive tumor necrosis! How to diagnose, what to do?

Remove if possible: When tumor get very large and essentially loose blood supply necrosis can set in. If extensive, tumor necrosis syndrome develops and release of toxins into the blood stream can occur. At this point debulking of the lesion is beneficial. ...Read more

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What is human tumor necrosis factor tnf alpha and why is it so painful?

What is human tumor necrosis factor tnf alpha and why is it so painful?

Does the term: Inflammatory cytokine help? It is not specific to any disease but may be a pathway to appetite loss, it's also called cachexin, and a pathway involved in cellular and organ injury...Including radiation, and possibly a cause of lung injury from xrt. It is not of itself painful. ...Read more

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If my aunt had a melanoma/ tumor in her eye, is there a chance that my family is predisposed to sarcomas?

If my aunt had a melanoma/ tumor in her eye, is there a chance that my family is predisposed to sarcomas?

No risk to thefamily: Melanoma has no significant connection to the development of Sarcomas. Although skin melanoma has a familial connection, the Eye melanoma (ocular melanoma) has no familial bearing. ...Read more

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How often do doctors look at tumor necrosis factor in a patients blood when definitively diagnosing someone for cardiac cachexia?

How often do doctors look at tumor necrosis factor in a patients blood when definitively diagnosing someone for cardiac cachexia?

Never heard of it: As a pathologist / lab specialist, let me reassure you. The diagnosis of cardiac cachexia is made on the most valuable of all tests -- the history and physical exam. Labs are useful when, and only when, they detect disease that you'd miss on h;p. Tumor necrosis factors were once called "cachexins" and may or may not have something to do with the curious wasting seen in cancer. ...Read more

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Is radiation for a squameous cell cancer tumor behind eye on optic nerve next to brain safe or could it cause necrosis of brain. Do I need proton?

Is radiation for a squameous cell cancer tumor behind eye on optic nerve next to brain safe or could it cause necrosis of brain. Do I need proton?

Palliative: Retrobulbar optic nerve involvement with metastatic tumor rare. Squamous malignancies are very few in that area. Chemo and RT given have mostly been palliative. Gamma knife therapy might be better than trying proton beam. With RT and chemo results in general have not been that encouraging. ...Read more

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What sarcomas can you get on the frontal skull bone? Can benign tumours be hard to spot on x rays?

What sarcomas can you get on the frontal skull bone? Can benign tumours be hard to spot on x rays?

Most any bone tumor: Most any bone tumor or one of the few types that metastasize to bone. Yes, sarcomas are difficult to detect by x-ray. ...Read more

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Is it true that a sarcoma is a neoplasia?

Yes: Sarcoma is a rare type of cancer that arises from bones, muscles, nerves, fat and connective tissues in general. Neoplasia (or neoplasm) means formation of new tissue. As sarcoma, or any cancer, involves growth of new tissue, it is therefore a neoplasm. ...Read more

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Sarcoma can be derived from which tissues?

Sarcoma can be derived from which tissues?

Supportive tissues: Sarcomas fall into a group of malignancies derived from supportive tissue. Osseous sarcomas are derived from bone. The liposarcomas, fibrosarcomas, neurosarcomas have their origin in tissue excluding glandular components as in bowel, They can arise in any part of the body from H&N to retroperitoneum extremity and supportive tissue of stomach and uterus ie leiomyosarcoma ...Read more

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What is the rate of recurrence for sarcoma?

What is the rate of recurrence for sarcoma?

It depends.: There are a wide variety of different sarcomas. The most important pieces of information regarding recurrence rates are if the sarcoma is "low grade" or "high grade" (also known as well vs. Poorly differentiated). Also, you should find out the exact kind of sarcoma. For example, is this liposarcoma, or is this a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor? Check with your surgeon or oncologist. ...Read more

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How do you treat recurrant Ewing's sarcoma?

Surgery, RT, chemo: When Ewing Sa metastasizes, most common site is lung. Once mets found cure is difficult. It may be necessary to treat the primary tumor with surgery and or RT, while the mets receive chemo. The current chemo regimen is a combination of drugs, doxorubicin, vincristine) cyclophosphamide and dactinomycin) Here combination chemotherapy has improved long term outcomes but not cures. ...Read more

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What are the major symptoms of ewing's sarcoma?

Pain and swelling: Ewing's sarcoma can arise from bones or soft tissues. In bones, ewing's presents with pain and usually a lump. In the soft tissues, there is a lump, but it is usually painless. Occasionally, patients may have fevers and chills. Not all sarcomas follow these rules, but these are the most common symptoms. ...Read more

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What is the definition or description of: sarcoma?

What is the definition or description of: sarcoma?

Kind of cancer: By definition, it is malignant (i.e., being locally invasive and at least theoreticlally capable of metastasizing), and arises from / mimics muscle or connective tissue elements that are not marrow or immune / white cells. The sarcomas are a tremendously varied and troublesome family of tumors, though thankfully less common than carcinomas and the leukemia / lymphoma / myeloma family. ...Read more

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What is the definition or description of: Ewing's sarcoma?

Primary Sa of Bone: Ewing’s sarcoma, typically starts in the long bones, but can start in other tissues and muscles as a primitive neuroectodermal tumor. It is the third most common primary bone cancer occurring most frequently in children and teenagers. Treatment consists of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, with vincristine, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide following surgical resection. 5 yr. Survival > 80% ...Read more

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Is there a gentle way to treat kaposi's sarcoma?

Kaposi's sarcoma: For most cases addressing the underlying immune deficiency is the primary treatment. Unfortunately "gentle" may be difficult to guarantee depending on your definition of the word. ...Read more

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What is the definition or description of: Kaposi's sarcoma?

Hemangiosarcoma: Originally diagnosed as a dark red nodular chronic skin tumor of the lower legs. It took years to metastasize and could be locally resected or treated by RT. With advent of HIV these lesions were then noted on trunk and H&N region. When bx of new lesions taken, Herpes 8 proved to be an associated factor. When HIV patient given immune stimulant and vaccine for Herpes 8 lesions resolve. ...Read more

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Could you tell me what happens if ewings sarcoma is not caught early?

Could you tell me what happens if ewings sarcoma is not caught early?

Early is hard....: Quantify. Implied in your question is a linear progression from localized to metastatic disease, but this may not be the case. There is research to suggest metastatic tumors are endowed with this ability from the start (the metastatic toolbox). Likewise, even apparently localized disease will shed tumor cells but not form metastases. Suggests different biology. Survival 75% (local) vs. <20% (mets). ...Read more

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Is sarcoma genetic?

Is sarcoma genetic?

ACTUALLY IT CAN BE: There are some genetic abnormalities that predispose people to have sarcoma- for instance: li- fraumeni syndrome- where there is 7% risk for sarcoma; gardner syndrome/fap- related to high frequency of intraabdominal desmoid tumor, retinoblastoma is associated with osteosarcoma, rothmund-thomson syndrome (poikiloderma congenitale) is associated with osteosarcoma- etc. ...Read more

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Is ewings sarcoma fatal?

Often is: Untreated, or treated only by a charlatan, it is 100% fatal. Generally it requires chemotherapy. The odds in early disease are quite good, and even with metastatic disease cures sometimes happen. ...Read more

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How is a sarcoma prevented?

It's not: Unfortunately, there are no known preventive measures for sarcoma. ...Read more

Neoplasms (Definition)

"tumor" literally translates as "mass", so even a fresh bruise could be called a "tumor". Doctors use the term "neoplasm" (tranlates literally as new growth) to describe tumors that are abnormal growths of cells. These may be benign or malignant; "malignant" = cancer. In everyday usage, we use "tumor" ...Read more


Necrosis (Definition)

Necrosis is the the death of cells and tissue. In dentistry, root canals are often needed when the pulp tissue inside a ...Read more