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Doctor insights on: Treatments For Ocular Myasthenia Gravis

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What conditions are similar to ocular myasthenia gravis?

What conditions are similar to ocular myasthenia gravis?

Muscle weakness: Other reasons for decreased use of muscles. This could be muscle diseases and neurological diseases. The usual clue is the occular involvement. This is where testing is done. Testing is to replace the loss of acetylcholine function like the tensilon test and other drugs that block the beakdown of acetylcholine by cholinesterase andtemporarily increases the level of acetylcholine and reverses it. ...Read more

Dr. Julian Bragg
358 doctors shared insights

Myasthenia Gravis (Definition)

Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune condition in which the body produces a protein that blocks information transmission along nerves. This leads to symptoms such as droopy ...Read more


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How often does ocular myasthenia gravis progress to general? I was recently diagnosed with ocular myasthenia gravis. My doctor says it will most likely spread to the rest of my body, but that it's possible it won't. What are the odds i'll be lucky enough

How often does ocular myasthenia gravis progress to general? I was recently diagnosed with ocular myasthenia gravis. My doctor says it will most likely spread to the rest of my body, but that it's possible it won't. What are the odds i'll be lucky enough

Ocular : Ocular myasthenia gravis affects the muscles of the eyes. It often begins with drooping eyelids or double vision, usually less in the morning than at night. According to the neurological literature, over 50% of people with ocular involvement develop generalized myasthenia in 2 years. Some studies have been done looking at treatment with Prednisone to reduce that incidence. Removal of the thymus gland is sometimes done. There are treatments available that modify the immune reaction such as plasmapheresis, intravenous immune globulins and some anti-immune drugs. The first drug used is called an anti-cholinesterase. Acetylcholine is the chemical released by nerve endings that activates muscle cells. In myasthenia gravis the problem is loss of receptor sites or "docking stations" the ach has to attach to to activate. Anticholinesterases inactivate the cholinesterase that would break down the ach before it finds a place to sit. It's a little like an odd game of musical chairs. These docking stations and acetyl choline are present on all muscle cells both in the eyes and in the limbs. Careful follow-up will keep the process under control. ...Read more

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52 year old female having ocular myasthenia gravis for past 2 years& hashimotos thyroiditis sgpt 323 sgot 523 ALP 330 totl bilrubn 2.6 &dirct 1.2?

52 year old female having ocular myasthenia gravis for past 2 years& hashimotos thyroiditis sgpt 323 sgot 523 ALP 330 totl bilrubn 2.6  &dirct 1.2?

Elevated liver tests: Along with myastenia and Hashimotos it looks like there is some type liver process invovled. It could be a primary liver probem or related to medications. You need to try to tie these all together. A rheumatologist and a gastroenterologist can help you with these. ...Read more

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What is ocular myasthenia?

What is ocular myasthenia?

Myasthenia: Ocular myasthenia is a form of myasthenia that only affects the eyes and typically has symptoms of drooping eyelids, double vision, or both. ...Read more

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Why is neostigmine preferred over edrophonium as a treatment for myasthenia gravis?

Why is neostigmine preferred over edrophonium as a treatment for myasthenia gravis?

Different uses: Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors are the first line of treatment due to their safety and ease of use. Pyridostigmine (Mestinon) is the usual choice. Neostigmine is available but not commonly used. Edrophonium is an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor but does not come in an oral form. It is mainly used as a diagnostic agent for MG. ...Read more

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What is the treatment for myasthenia gravis?

What is the treatment for myasthenia gravis?

Multiple: About 1/3 can see spontaneous remission, 1/3 stabilize on chronic medications, and 1/3 have progressive difficulties. Chronic and/or longterm medications may aid but can have significant adverse impact on life and/or health. In appropriate candidates, thoracic surgery to remove thymus (thymectomy) can possibly cure: http://goo.Gl/3xxmd. ...Read more

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What is the acoustic wave therapy influence on muscles affected by myasthenia gravis?

What is the acoustic wave therapy influence on muscles affected by myasthenia gravis?

Not sure: This doesn't sound like "conventional" therapy, but if it doesn't hurt/cost much/is harmful, then why not try? More conventional wisdom on mg can be found here: http://www.Ninds.Nih.Gov/disorders/myasthenia_gravis/detail_myasthenia_gravis.Htm. ...Read more

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No dose change, but WHY some days when take my Vicodin I'm FINE then other times feel weak,tired,SOB? I do have myasthenia gravis. Any ideas?

No dose change, but WHY some days when take my Vicodin I'm FINE then other times feel weak,tired,SOB? I do have myasthenia gravis. Any ideas?

INTERPRETATION: Vicodin is an opioid analgesic and has NO beneficial effect on the neuromuscular junctional issue in myasthenia. I am unaware if you are taking Mestinon (pyridostigmine) or steroids or other immunological agents, but if you are fluctuating, you do need specific meds for your weakness, in spite of prior thymectomy. Suggest a visit to a neurologist who focuses in neuromuscular areas. ...Read more