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Doctor insights on: Treatments For Klumpkes Palsy

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Please name the treatment brachial plexus injury?

Please name the treatment brachial plexus injury?

Variety of therapies: But for thoracic outlet syndrome, pectoralis minor syndrome, and brachial plexus stretch injuries, find FELDENKREIS approach very useful.. Hope that is what you seek. ...Read more

Palsy (Definition)

...is a corruption of French "paralise" from Latinized Greek "paralysis." In the old days it meant any kind of persistent weakness. To this day Parkinson's disease is also called "paralysis agitans" which is a Latin translation of Dr. Parkinson's original name for it, the "shaking palsy." We've obviously reborrowed the full form "paralysis" into English as well; today ...Read more


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What are your treatment options for a brachial plexus injury?

Varieble: If acute, might use steroids, but if chronic, analgesics, and physical therapy. If thoracic outlet syndrome, maybe Feldenkries postural therapy, but if unresponsive, perhaps surgical decompression. If rootlets avulsed from spinal cord, no reversibility, and must treat with palliation. ...Read more

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How often are an obstetric brachial plexus injury ( erbs palsy ) permanent?

How often are an obstetric brachial plexus injury ( erbs palsy ) permanent?

0.5-1.6%.: Overall incidence of congenital permanent brachial plexus injury is 0.04-0.2% of us live births. If you have shoulder dystocia, permanent injury to the brachial plexus is anticipated in 0.5-1.6% of cases. ...Read more

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What's the treatment for bell's palsy?

What's the treatment for bell's palsy?

Antivirals: At the first signs: lid droop, mouth droop, inability to smile, sometimes pain infront of ear, start an antiviral. Use of steroids is controversial but most studies show no effect. Most bell's gets better in 2-6 months but some leave a residual droop which can be surgically addressed at that time. ...Read more

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What are the treatments for bell's palsy?

What are the treatments for bell's palsy?

Several: The original kaiser studies suggested that steroid therapies might work well, and later studies suggested some benefit with thiamine. Since there is evidence that both herpes simplex and zoster may cause variations of bell's palsy, anti-virals may be used. However, even if not treated 92.5% of cases fully recover on their own after several weeks. ...Read more

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What is the best treatment for erb's palsy?

What is the best treatment for erb's palsy?

Erb palsy: I assume this is in an infant and initially physical therapy and EMG to evaluate for the amount of therapy. In cases where there is minimal no recovery then surgery on the brachial plexus might be indicated. ...Read more

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What's the best treatment for bell's palsy?

What's the best treatment for bell's palsy?

Early steroid Rx: The treatment of idiopathic facial palsy is early treatment with steroids. ...Read more

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Are there treatment guidelines for bell's palsy?

Yes: Bell's palsy is an exclusionary diagnosis that first needs to be verified. Treatment is geared to maintain moisture of the cornea. Treatments range according to severity of disease. Possibilities include lubrication with drops or ointment, taping the eye shut while sleeping, temporarily sewing the eye closed, placing a weight in the upper lid to aid in closure. These are just to name a few.... ...Read more

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What are the treatment options for bell's palsy?

Steroids?: Although the vast majority of patients with bell's may fully recover without treatment, most neurologists would utilize several days to weeks of steroid treatment, and perhaps add b vitamins. Rarely, surgical decompression has been employed, but often results are disappointing. In those very rare cases of irreversibility, neurosurgeons can use the hypoglossal nerve to improve facial nerve fnctn. ...Read more

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Dr. William Singer
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Paralysis (Definition)

A paralyzed limb cannot be voluntarily moved, and the term reflects leg involvement, paraplegia, full body, quadriplegia, and less than full, tetraplegia. Causes can be many, including stroke, trauma, ...Read more