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Doctor insights on: Treatment Of Joint Hypermobility

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What is joint hypermobility and is physiotherapy a good treatment option?

What is joint hypermobility and is physiotherapy a good treatment option?

May help: Joint hypermobility or loose joints result from ligament laxity. Physical therapy can not truly strengthen ligaments but can help with muscle strength and proprioception and may therefore be beneficial. ...Read more

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Dr. Laurence Badgley
305 doctors shared insights

Joint Hypermobility (Definition)

Joint hypermobility, also known as double joints, is a clinical finding in which a person's joints are more flexible than normal, resulting in the ability to extend joints beyond where they are typically able to. This is more common in conditions ...Read more


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What are the symptoms of joint hypermobility?

What are the symptoms of joint hypermobility?

Hypermobility: Increased motion of a joint that can lead to pain, giving way, and swelling. ...Read more

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Joint hypermobility cause of tendonitis?

Joint hypermobility cause of tendonitis?

Sometimes: One of the potential causes of tendonitis is overuse by the muscle/tendon unit trying to stabilize a hypermobile joint. This is certainly the case with the posterior tibial tendon in individuals with flexible flatfoot. However, not all tendinitis is related to joint hypermobility, so you would need to consult with your doctor to determine the cause of your tendinitis. ...Read more

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Are joint hypermobility and tendonitis related?

Sort of: There is some evidence that those with hypermobilty are at increased risk of sprains and strains, although there also exists some evidence to the contrary. Pathophysiologically speaking, I am not aware of any studies implicating changes in the structure of tendons among individuals with hypermobility ...Read more

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What is the condition called joint hypermobility syndrome?

What is the condition called joint hypermobility syndrome?

Collagen disorder: Jhs is a constellation of symptoms that are very similar to marfans syndrome and erhlers danlos syndrome. It is due to an abnormality of collagen which causes tissues to stretch more than normally. Of course this increases your risk of joint problems, but can also result in heart problems and blood vessel problems. ...Read more

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Is mckenzie method for benign joint hypermobility syndrome?

Is mckenzie method for benign joint hypermobility syndrome?

For disc issues: Mckenzie program is an exercise program aimed at identifying a neutral, pain free core posture and learning to maintain this through your active life style to minimize pain due to dosc based pain syndromes. ...Read more

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What is the connection between joint hypermobility and tendonitis?

What is the connection between joint hypermobility and tendonitis?

Overstretching tendo: With increased ability for joints to move more than the normal range, the tendons (muscle to bone connectors) and ligaments (bone to bone connecters) get over stretched causing micro tears and inflammation from the excessive range of motion. This is the connection between hyper mobility and inflamed tendons. ...Read more

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Is the mckenzie method good for benign joint hypermobility syndrome?

Is the mckenzie method good for benign joint hypermobility syndrome?

Mckenzie: Not really. Strength work is better. Pilates based exercises are probably more appropriate. ...Read more

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What is joint hypermobility and will getting physiotherapy effectively treat it?

What is joint hypermobility and will getting physiotherapy effectively treat it?

Poorly understood dx: JHS is symptomatic hypermobility. Many individuals who have hypermobility never have pain or require any treatment. When hypermobility is found associated with pain, or a few other criteria (see Brighton criteria) it is termed JHS. It is presumed to be caused by a defect in collagen but rarely have collagen related genes been implicated (TNXB gene). ...Read more

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Dr. Stratos Christianakis
1,189 doctors shared insights

Joints (Definition)

Joints are parts of the body, formed by the cartilage-covered ends of bones plus the strong, flexible ligaments that attach the bones to one another. Movements at the joints in the body allow the different parts of the body to move in ...Read more