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Doctor insights on: Treat Pain Developed Syringomyelia

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Is there anything I can do to treat the neuropathic pain i've developed after my syringomyelia surgery?

Is there anything I can do to treat the neuropathic pain i've developed after my syringomyelia surgery?

Maybe: Sorry to hear this. These things may take some time: r lipoic acid 100 mg 2x/ day, b vitamins (be careful not to take too much b6). Good nutrition is key; probiotics can help nutrient absorption try acupuncture (may need to try several practitioners) and find someone with a therapy called frequency specific microcurrent. My clinical experience with these indicate they work for some people. ...Read more

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Dr. Scott Falci
187 doctors shared insights

Syringomyelia (Definition)

Syringomyelia is a medical condition in which there is an abnormal collection of fluid in the spinal cord. This fluid collection can compress nerves and cause ...Read more


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Are there drugs to treat syringomyelia?

Not really: The standard of care for managing syringomyelia is to decrease pressure effects that could cause the syrinx (spinal cord cyst) to expand. Avoid valsalva (bearing down, holding your breath) and control high blood pressure-- you may take stool softeners or medications for high blood pressure, but ultimately the syrinx may require decompression with a shunt procedure. ...Read more

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Syringomyelia-what is it and how to treat?

Syringomyelia: This is an abnormal dilation of the usually very small column of spinal fluid that runs through the center of the spinal cord. It can also extend into the brainstem (syringobulbia). Most commonly, it is caused by trauma. However, tumors and developmental problems (chiari, tethered cord) need to be ruled out. Unless there is a structural cause, they usually do not require treatment. ...Read more

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Should an extensive syringomyelia and syringobulbia be treated right after diagnosis or should it just be monitored?

Syringomyelia: Syringomelia associated with sryingobulbia is a serious condition. Treatment from a surgical point of view is based on the symptoms and the progression of symptoms. If the findings are stable then nothing needs to be done in an urgent fashion. If the symptoms are progressive then earlier intervention, especially surgery would be considered. ...Read more

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How should syringomyelia and syringobulbia be treated? I also suffer with blackouts. Could these be related?

Could be related: If you have syringomyelia (fluid in the spinal cord) and syringobulbia (fluid in the brainstem) they are likely contiguous (connected) and the most common cause is a Chiari malformation. With a Chiari, you may have the sensation of blacking out with valsalva (cough or bearing down). There are other causes, so you should look into this soon and have it treated if possible. ...Read more

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Which drug will help with syringomyelia pain?

Which drug will help with syringomyelia pain?

SYringomyelia: Syringomyelia can be a congential issue or from a post-traumtic injury. The central neuropatic pain can be addressed in a number of ways depending on the nature of the syrinx. It would be best to see a neurosurgeon who specializes in this in order to determine what is the best course of treatment. ...Read more

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Pts w/ syringomyelia: when researched, 99% of pts, had same complaints of pain, severity, location, yet the vast majority of drs, say pain unrelated?

See your doctor: Each of these cases is unique, and we need to be concerned about your specifics. If you are not getting any answers, get a second or third opinion. ...Read more

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Pts w/ syringomyelia, majority of drs say sm causes no pain, if a something foreign is centered in the cord, logically, how no pain? 1 of 2 questions.

Pts w/ syringomyelia, majority of drs say sm causes no pain, if a something foreign is centered in the cord, logically, how no pain? 1 of 2 questions.

Syrinx or cord canal: It depends. If it is a enlarged central canal and the fluid does not break into the cord tissue, then there may be no pain. If the central pain pathways are very stretched by a large dilated central canal, or, if the fluid has broken through the central canal wall and collected in the cord tissue, pain can range from mild to severe. Image shows a dilated central canal and not a true syrinx. ...Read more