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Doctor insights on: Topical Anticoagulant

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Is it usually safe to let a perianal haematoma run its (painful) course without surgical intervention? Topical anticoagulant??

Is it usually safe to let a perianal haematoma run its (painful) course without surgical intervention? Topical anticoagulant??

Yes: This clotted hemorrhoid (that's what it sounds like) or perianal hematoma will slowly resolve. Suggest you try Sitz Baths with hot water (not "burning" but as hot as you can tolerate it) may help the pain and "speed" the resolution of the clot (resorption)! Hope this helps and BTW topical anticoagulants are useless in this condition! Hope this helps Dr Z ...Read more

Dr. Boris Aronzon
523 Doctors shared insights

Blood Thinners (Definition)

Agents which slow ;/or break down blood clot formation in up to 3 different ways (they do not decrease blood viscosity; thickness.) (1) some inhibit platelet function (e.g. Aspirin, clopidogrel, etc.). (2) others interfere with some of the clot forming proteins (warfarin, dabigatran, rivaroxaban, etc.), (3) others stimulate the blood clot destruction ...Read more


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Are there any household anticoagulants?

Are there any household anticoagulants?

No.: There are no non-prescription anticoagulants. Aspirin is actually not an anticoagulant, but interferes with blood clotting by inhibiting platelets, a different component of coagulation. Anticoagulants should only be given under medical supervision as there are significant risks if taken inappropriately. ...Read more

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What is the newly approved anticoagulant?

There a few: Three new agents out, apixaban, pradaxa, xaralto. Each has its adavantages. No measuring levels and no food retrictions like coumadin (warfarin). Although they are better than Coumadin (warfarin) and have less bleeding, when pts do bleed from these, there isn't a reversal agent like coumadin (warfarin). ...Read more

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What's circulating anticoagulant disorder?

What's circulating anticoagulant disorder?

A blood abnormality: It is a substance in the blood, usually an antibody, that interferes with the tests that analyze of ability of blood to clot. The most common is an anti-phospholipid antibody, or lupus anticoagulant, which actually makes clotting more likely. There are other antibodies that can make blood not clot (acquired hemophilia, etc.) drugs that prevent clotting are also "circulating" anticoagulants. ...Read more

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Can I take garlic with an anticoagulant? Thanks.

Ask: The doctor who prescribed the anticoagulant. Garlic thins the blood and (S)he may not want you to use it. ...Read more

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What is the dosage range of oral anticoagulants?

Anticoagulants: There is a wide range of anticoagulants available and they all have their individual doses. There is no 'range' other than for individual drugs and there isn't space here enough to discuss all of them. ...Read more

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How do ions in the body effect anticoagulant medicine?

They don't: The common ions that are present in large quantities are sodium, potassium, chloride, magnesium, phosphorous, and calcium. These minerals do not affect anticoagulant medicine although they have very important effects on nerve and muscle function. ...Read more

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Should anyone on an anticoagulant have a pt test done?

Usually: Usually, unless one of the purified products used, products which use a fixed dose on all individuals. ...Read more

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What is the definition or description of: anticoagulant?

Clot Stopper: Anticoagulants are any of a variety of drugs which decrease the body's ability to make or sustain blood clots. They fall, generally, into two categories. Drugs like Aspirin and clopidogrel (plavix) prevent platelets from forming the initial stages of a clot. Drugs like warfarin (coumadin) and dabigatran (pradaxa) block the later process of solidifying the clot. ...Read more

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What is circulating anticoagulant disorder? What causes it?

Circulating anticoag: Read this: http://www. Merckmanuals. Com/professional/hematology-and-oncology/coagulation-disorders/coagulation-disorders-caused-by-circulating-anticoagulants

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What are the advantages and disadvantages of new anticoagulants?

Adv & disadvantages: The advantages are that they no longer require blood tests to monitor their effectiveness. Diadvantages: cost & safety concerns (as you would how to expect with any new drug). ...Read more

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How long should it take for anticoagulants to leave your system?

Varies: Full dose aspirin: 3-5 days baby aspirin: 1-2 days plavix: 7 days. Coumadin: 5-7 days. Heparin: 2-3 hours. Lovemox: 12 hours. These are approximations. Hope this helps. ...Read more

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What is the difference between anticoagulants and antiaggregants?

What is the difference between anticoagulants and antiaggregants?

Drugs: antiplatelet drugs interfere with platelet aggregation. Anticoagulant drugs interfere with the coagulation cascade. Antithrombotic is a term covering both kinds of clot medication. ...Read more

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Can you please tell me what exactly is circulating anticoagulant disorder?

See below: These are usually antibodies that your body produces to defeat clotting factors and may cause bleeding. Some, like the lupus anticoagulant, however, increase the risk of clotting, paradoxically. ...Read more

Dr. Le Wang Dr. Wang
2 doctors agreed:
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New anticoagulants, is one more likely to have serious bleeds with them than Warferin? Thanks

Dr. Le Wang Dr. Wang
2 doctors agreed:

Not really: All anticoagulants increase the bleeding risk. The new anticoagulants (Xarelto, Eliquis) do not appear to increase bleeding risk more than Coumadin (warfarin). But there are no specific antidotes available for newer anticoagulants. This could be a concern sometimes. ...Read more

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What are the risks of taking anticoagulants?

What are the risks of taking anticoagulants?

Mainly Bleeding: Anticoagulants, also know as blood thinners, can cause bleeding. A cut can bleed more than usual, a bruise can lead to swelling (hematoma) as blood collects under the skin, gums or the nose can bleed, etc. Rarely, you may have an allergic reaction and a very rare problem with coumadin (warfarin) is "skin necrosis" where the med actually triggers excess clotting and injury to skin and other tissue. ...Read more

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Does the human body have a natural anticoagulant?

Yes: Yes, your body is full of checks and balances. For every signal that promotes blood clotting, there is another prepared to anticoagulate. Unfortunately, this hasn't really been harnessed into a drug that can prevent blood clots quite yet. ...Read more

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How will phlebotomy affect me if I'm on anticoagulants?

More bruising: IF you are anticoagulants you may have more bruising after a blood draw. It may take a bit longer for it to stop bleeding, a few more seconds. However that is basically it. There may not be any difference in your experience with phlebotomy. ...Read more

Anticoagulant (Definition)

Anticoagulants are any of a variety of drugs which decrease the body's ability to make or sustain blood clots. They fall, generally, into two categories. Drugs like Aspirin and clopidogrel (plavix) prevent platelets from forming the initial stages of a clot. Drugs like warfarin (coumadin) and dabigatran (pradaxa) block the later process ...Read more