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Doctor insights on: Too Much Iron In Blood

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What if I have too much iron in blood from too many pills?

What if I have too much iron in blood from too  many pills?

Iron overload: It is uncommon for iron overload to occur as a result of "too many pills". More likely etiologies are congenital disorders such as hemochromatosis or repetitive blood transfusions. It is important for you to be seen by a hematologist to determine how severe your iron overload is, what the etiology is, and what's the best treatment. ...Read more

Iron (Definition)

In the metal group ...Read more


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Will hemotomochrosis ( too much iron in blood) effect a mans fertility?

Will hemotomochrosis ( too much iron in blood) effect a mans fertility?

Possibly: Hemochromatosis can be an infiltrative disease and that's important in fertility because if the pituitary gland is infiltrated with iron it can alter the signals to the gonads (testes and ovaries). Because of this, there can be a decrease in production of either sperm or eggs and that obviously isn't good when you're talking about fertility. ...Read more

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Can too much iron in blood cause the hands break out in cracks that bleed?

Can too much iron in blood cause the hands break out in cracks that bleed?

Unlikely: Chapped, dry, cracking skin sounds like a type of eczema.Frequent washing or wet hands makes this worse.Perscription meds may be required to control this condition. ...Read more

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What causes too much iron in ur blood?

What causes too much iron in ur blood?

Mostly genetics : Too much iron is called hemochromatosis which is an inherited condition. This is a dangerous condition requiring medical attention. If you suspect you have iron overload, please se your doctor. ...Read more

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Is it possible to have too much iron in their blood?

Many people: A genetic mutation in the gene controlling iron metabolism is one of the commonest mutations in caucasians. ...Read more

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Hi. I have too much iron in my blood and was tested, but dont have hemocromathosis. What is best for me to do ti get it in balance?

Hi. I have too much iron in my blood and was tested, but dont have hemocromathosis. What is best for me to do ti get it in balance?

Donate blood: If you are otherwise eligible to donate blood, you should do so. You will be doing a good deed and it will lessen you iron overload. For good health - Have a diet rich in fresh vegetables, fruits, whole grains, low fat milk and milk products, nuts, beans, legumes, lentils and small amounts of lean meats. Avoid saturated fats. Exercise at least 150 minutes/week and increase the intensity of exercise gradually. Do not use tobacco, alcohol, weed or street drugs in any form. Practice safe sex. ...Read more

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No period for 2 yrs bcuz i lose too much iron &blood on it. What's the best way for me to get pregnant without having to have a period?

Consult a specialist: You will likely need to have at least a few cycles in order to get pregnant. Or you can see a reproductive endocrine and infertility specialist (rei) doctor who can help you get pregnant. Most drs would recommend that if periods make you anemic that you are on daily iron pills, and possibly further investigation by dr if you have an iron-deficiency issue other than blood loss. With planning! ...Read more

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What should I do if I have too much copper and iron in blood?

What should I do if I have too much copper and iron in blood?

Blood abnormalities: First how do you know you have too much copper and iron in your blood. We need the rest of the lab reports to properly interpret these values and to be able to answer the question. I would not try anything you find online or otc without speaking to a doctor. ...Read more

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What should blood iron levels be?

What should blood iron levels be?

See below: Normal reference ranges are: serum iron men: 65 to 176 ?g/dl women: 50 to 170 ?g/dl newborns: 100 to 250 ?g/dl children: 50 to 120 ?g/dl tibc: 240–450 ?g/dl transferrin saturation: 20–50% ?g/dl = micrograms per deciliter. All lab results should be interpreted in the clinical context, so consult your doctor. ...Read more

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