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Doctor insights on: Tissue Specific Gene Expression

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Describe microrna gene expression deregulation in human breast cancer?

Describe microrna gene expression deregulation in human breast cancer?

Can't do in 400: The study of micro-rnas is cutting-edge and extremely arcane and you need to go directly to pubmed or one of the other big ways to access the scientific data. If someone is offering a breast cancer treatment to re-regulate your micro-rna's, call your district attorney. Glad you have an inquiring mind and i wish you luck with your project. ...Read more

Genetic (Definition)

From a medical standpoint, "genetic" refers to the potential heritability of various medical conditions. While some conditions are inevitable (at some point in one's life) as a consequence of simple genetic heritability (eg huntington's disease), a large number of medical conditions (including all behaviorial health disorders) are the expressed final pathway of a ...Read more


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Gene expression profiling predicts clinical outcome of breast cancer?

Gene expression profiling predicts clinical outcome of breast cancer?

We're Getting There: In the past, we used anatomic staging alone (tumor size, lymph node involvement) to guide rx. Gene profiling allows us a completely separate measure of prognosis, and, more importantly, can predict who may or may not benefit from different chemotherapy agents. In the future, we will hopefully be able to tailor our rx to the specific cancer being treated: the elusive personalized medicine. ...Read more

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Cause of a positive monoclonal T cell beta gene rearrangement?

Cause of a positive monoclonal T cell beta gene rearrangement?

Tumor: Monoclonal proliferation of lymphoid cells is usually an indication of tumor of the lymphoid tissue. ...Read more

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Etiology of DNA mutations?

Etiology of DNA mutations?

Replication error: Most changes in dna come from errors in the duplication of the dna. But changes can occur in the structure from radiation and some chemicals especially those used in chemotherapy. Most mutations are harmless, some are tracked down by your normal reparative mechanism but a few can cause trouble including cancer. ...Read more

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What are germline gene alterations?

What are germline gene alterations?

Inheritable: "germline" refers to genes that are present in every cell of the body from conception or shortly afterwards, including sperm/ ova, and thus can be passed down to offspring. This term is used to distinguish these types of inherited genetic mutations from those that are not inherited - not present in the dna of sperm or ova. ...Read more

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Which genes control cell growth in pancreatic tissue?

Which genes control cell growth in pancreatic tissue?

There are: literally millions of genes that control cell growth not only in pancreatic tissue but throughout the entire body. Why do you ask? ...Read more

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What is the function of protein kinases in gene expression?

What is the function of protein kinases in gene expression?

Signal transduction: Signal transduction is a way for a cell to convert an extracellular signal into a response. Some protein kinases are part of signal transduction pathways. They are cellular enzymes that modify other cellular components by adding phosphate groups to them. This causes a biochemical chain of events that may result in altered levels of gene expression. ...Read more

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What type of genetic mutation causes breast cancer?

What type of genetic mutation causes breast cancer?

Many: If you inherit mutated brca1 or brca2 from a parent, your odds are greatly increased. All cancers arise from accumulated mutations and natural selection over your own lifetime, but these can actually be passed from parent to child. ...Read more

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Is the beta-thalassemia gene recessive or dominant?

Is the beta-thalassemia gene recessive or dominant?

Neither: People normally have 2 beta globulin genes. A mutation in one or both genes leads to 3 levels of beta thalassemia. The genetics of the disorder is not all-or-none nor dominant-recessive. Instead, more or worse mutations causes worse disease. One mutation = beta thal trait (mild symptoms), 2 mutations = beta thal intermedia (transfusions sometimes) or beta thal major (lifelong transfusions needed). ...Read more

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Is breast cancer caused by a mutation in the gene or by a problem with the gene expression?

Is breast cancer caused by a mutation in the gene or by a problem with the gene expression?

Gene mutation: If not a genetically inherited , environmental conditions initiate the induction of the breast lesion. The most common mutation occurs with the long terminal repeat of the MMTV virus enters the Wnt-1 gene. This produces an over expression of B-catenin which results in transformation. EBV infection probably needed for FGARAT production that acts to overexpress telomerase inducing immortality. ...Read more

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Is cell therapy different from gene therapy?

Is cell therapy different from gene therapy?

Yes: Cell therapy generally involves stem or pluripotent cells that have the potential, under the right triggers, to grow into many different types of cells. These cells are then transplanted to an area of disease. Gene therapy generally involves replacing small dysfunctional segments of dna. Dna is present in almost every cell in our body and is the instruction manual that tells the cell what to do. ...Read more

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Which type of genetic mutation can cause breast cancer?

BRCA: The most commonly described genetic mutations associated with family history include brca1 and brca2 gene mutations. There are several other familial cancer syndromes though, and can be related to other genes such as p53 (li fraumeni syndrome) and pten (cowden's disease). Hereditary genetic syndromes as a whole are rare and comprise only about 10% of patients who have breast cancer. ...Read more

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Are there particular genes involved in breast cancer?

Are there particular genes involved in breast cancer?

Yes: There are 2 gene mutations, brca1 and brca2, which have been discovered and which substantially increase one's risk of getting breast cancer. Since breast cancer tends to run in families, there are probably many other gene mutations which haven't been discovered yet. But most women who get breast cancer do not have a family history, so it is likely that there are other factors besides genes. ...Read more

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What are the differences between recombinant tissue plasminogen activator and tissue plasminogen activator?

What are the differences between recombinant tissue plasminogen activator and tissue plasminogen activator?

Same aa sequence: tPA and its recombinant version (Activase) are identical with respect to the amino acid sequence. There have been reported some minor differences with respect to glycosylation of the protein, but this is well within the specifications of the cGMP production by the manufacturer. ...Read more

Tissue (Definition)

The body is composed of tissue that are classically described as beiing derived from three basic embyonic layers known as the endoderm, mesoderm and ectoderm that then differentiate into the structures that compose the body such as skin, soft tissues, bone, muscle, organs, etc. Stem cells are not differentiated and have the potential to ...Read more


Gene (Definition)

A hereditary unit consisting of a sequence of dna that occupies a specific location on a chromosome and determines a particular characteristic in an organism. Genes undergo mutation when their ...Read more