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Doctor insights on: The Human Immunodeficiency Virus Hiv Disrupts

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How is the human immunodeficiency virus (hiv) transmitted?

How is the human immunodeficiency virus (hiv) transmitted?

Sharing body fluids: Hiv is a sexually transmitted infection. It can also be spread by contact with infected blood, or from mother to child during pregnancy, childbirth or breast-feeding. It can take years before HIV weakens the immune system to the point that the patient has aids. There is no cure for hiv/aids, but there are medications that can dramatically slow the progression of the disease. ...Read more

Dr. Sheila Smith
16 doctors shared insights

Hiv (Definition)

Hiv infection is caused by a retrovirus....This retrovirus binds to CD4 cells (for the most part). You may detect the virus by several different methods. An elisa test (enzyme linked immunosorbent assay). You may also detect it by doing a test referred to as a western blot (a gel protein electrophoresis). Thirdly by pcr (polymerase chain reaction) which ...Read more


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What causes the human immunodeficiency virus?

What causes the human immunodeficiency virus?

HIV: The obvious answer is that HIV causes it. But perhaps you meant "how do you get it?" you get HIV by having unsafe sex or by sharing needles/syringes by someone else who has it. ...Read more

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Does the HIV virus infect the germ cell spermatozoa?

Likely not.: It is most likely that the virus may be in the white blood cells within the seminal fluid. Whether they nonspecifically adhere to the sperm as many dna viruses do, is less clear. Regardless, many fertility programs around the world have developed ways to "wash" sperm from HIV positive men and have used it to make healthy babies. ...Read more

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The human immunodeficiency virus (hiv) infects helper t cells. What is the role of these cells?

The human immunodeficiency virus (hiv) infects helper t cells. What is the role of these cells?

Cellular immunity: These are cells that work as part of the cellular immune system, fighting certain fungal (e.g. Cryptococcus), viral (e.g. Herpesviruses), parastic (e.g. Toxoplasma), and bacterial (e.g. Tuberulosis) infections. The cellular immune system also helps to prevent certain cancers, such as lymphomas. ...Read more

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How is the human immunodeficiency virus (hiv) transmitted to heterosexuals?

How is the human immunodeficiency virus (hiv) transmitted to heterosexuals?

Same as heterosex: Hiv is transmitted by the virus present in body secretions deposited onto areas of either mucous membranes (rectal mucosa, oral mucosa or tonsils) where there are receptor sites to which the virus attaches. There are some forms of sexual activity in which individuals are more prone to bleeding, in which case these bleeding sites present a rapid route for viral entry. ...Read more

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Human immunodeficiency virus--can it mutate?

Human immunodeficiency virus--can it mutate?

Yes: Hiv mutates in response to HIV therapy. If you're being treated without a complete response (partial suppression), the virus can mutate so it can replicate in the presence of the drugs. This usually happens in people who don't take their medications properly. They can then transmit the mutant virus to others. Spontaneous mutation (mutation independent of therapy) has not been a big problem. ...Read more

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How does the human immunodeficiency virus cause AIDS?

How does the human immunodeficiency virus cause AIDS?

Attacks T cells: T lymphocytes, part of the white blood cells, are the main cells in the specialized immune system, Especially the T helper cells, so when attacked the HIV virus, the whole immune system becomes deranged, hence the development of AIDS, ...Read more

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How is the human immunodeficiency virus (hiv) transmitted easiest?

Blood: Tainted blood transfusions are the easiest way to become infected with hiv. In the developed world, all blood is screened for HIV and blood transfusions are safe. Other high risk activities include sharing needles for intravenous drug use with infected individuals and having unprotected receptive anal intercourse with an HIV infected person. ...Read more

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What is the human para-influenza virus?

What is the human para-influenza virus?

CDC says....: Here's a good article to address your question: http://www.cdc.gov/parainfluenza/ ...Read more

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What type of cell does herpesviridae (herpesvirus) infect in humans?

What type of cell does herpesviridae (herpesvirus) infect in humans?

Skin cells: The herpes virus comes in 2 types: herpes simplex (hsv) 1&2. Antibodies (igg) to both viruses can be tested to see if you have lasting immunity and (igm) short-term antibodies check to see if you have had a recent infection. Unfortunately the igg levels can not tell how long ago you were exposed. Also herpes 1 & 2 viruses can cause either oral or genital herpes. Hope that helps. ...Read more

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Explan why one human immunodeficiency virus test cannot definitely diagnose hiv?

Good question: The HIV test to which you refer is an elisa assay which is quite sensitive but not as specific as the confirmatory western blot. These measure the presence of antibodies to the HIV and these may take from 2 wks to several months to develop. If you run the test before the antibodies have appeared, it will be negative, only to change to positive once antibody formation has occurred. ...Read more

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What is the origin of human t-lymphotrophic virus? Did it originate from primates (simian viruses?)?

What is the origin of human t-lymphotrophic virus?  Did it originate from primates (simian viruses?)?

Probably: The human t-lymphotropic virus type i is a human RNA retrovirus that is known to cause adult t-cell leukemia and lymphoma, and a demyelinating disease called htlv-i associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. Htlv-i is one of a group of closely related primate t lymphotropic viruses. The ones that infect old-world primates are called simian t-lymphotropic viruses. ...Read more

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How is human parvo virus transmitted?

How is human parvo virus transmitted?

Fifth disease: Here is a nice discussion by the cdc on your question. http://www.cdc.gov/parvovirusb19/fifth-disease.html. ...Read more

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What is the human parvo virus?

What is the human parvo virus?

Parvovirus: It is a virus that causes a fever and rash in.Children. Infection causes a transient slow down in red cell formation which is important in people with hemolytic anemias like sickle cell and during pregnancy when the fetus may die. ...Read more

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What all is caused by the human immunodeficiency virus?

HIV infection/AIDS: The HIV virus causes HIV infection and aids. There are many clinical manifestations of HIV infection and aids, which are too numerous to list here. ...Read more

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Is human t cell leukemia/lymphotropic virus (htlv-1) contagious?

Is human t cell leukemia/lymphotropic virus (htlv-1) contagious?

Yes: Both htlv-1 and htlv-2 are spread by sexual transmission, from mother to child, and by exposure to infective blood through transfusions and injection drug use. In this respect the virus is contagious. It does not appear it is transmitted in any other way. ...Read more

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Can the HIV virus have originated from human experiments with chemical weapons.?

Can the HIV virus have originated from human experiments with chemical weapons.?

No: Hiv is a virus and humans could not have created it with chemicals. It likely spread from primates to humans. ...Read more

Dr. Ed Friedlander
1,495 doctors shared insights

Human Immunodeficiency Virus (Definition)

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a lentivirus (a member of the retrovirus family) that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (aids), [1][2] a condition in humans in which progressive failure of the immune system allows life-threatening opportunistic infections ...Read more


Dr. Dawn Sokol
176 doctors shared insights

Weak Immune System (Definition)

that's when a person has a weakened immune system from whatever reason: drugs, infection, malnutrition, etc. While immunodeficiency, is when an arm of the immune system is weakened or absent, can be something primary (born with) or secondary (acquired later in life) ...Read more