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Doctor insights on: Temporal Sclerosis

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Multiple sclerosis = demyelination?

Multiple sclerosis = demyelination?

Characteristic: Demyelination refers to damage to the coverings of the nerves in the brain and spinal cord, and is very characteristic of the inflammatory process that occurs in ms. This can also occur in children with hereditary leukodystrophies, and can be associated with acquired neurological disorders. The disease modifying drugs in MS are designed to control demyelination and many work well. ...Read more

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Dr. Patricia Foster
3 doctors shared insights

Sclerosis (Definition)

We neurologists employ the term to describe localized damage involving the central nervous system, and sclerosis means scarring. If in many areas, might be multiple sclerosis. If affecting the motor nerve cell, ...Read more


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Does temporal lobe epilepsy cause dyscalucia .

Does temporal lobe epilepsy cause dyscalucia .

Coexisting: There may be coexisting problems of Temporal Lobe epilepsy and dyscalculia. Unlikely to be a cause and effect relationship ...Read more

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Can somebody describe temporal lobe epilepsy?

Need more words: Simple and complex focal epilepsy are difficult to diagnose, ; represent 40% of all epilepsies. Presentation varies from small motor tics, unusual perceptual disturbances, time-distortion, derealization, panic-like sxs, compulsive behaviors, catatonic variants, atypical aggressive outbursts, obsessions, and much more. See a specialist in 1) epilepsy or 2) behavioral neurology ; neuropsych. ...Read more

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Is amyotrophic lateral sclerosis a type of multiple sclerosis (ms)?

Is amyotrophic lateral sclerosis a type of multiple sclerosis (ms)?

Not similar diseases: Als is very different, and is a disease of "mis-folded proteins" like alzheimers and parkinson's, and all of these affect older people. Ms is an autoimmune disease afflicting younger patients who have hereditary susceptibilities and environmental exposures. Ms can be successfully treated and controlled, but ALS does not respond well to current therapies. ...Read more

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What is amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (als)? 

What is amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (als)? 

Motor neuron disease: A disorder of misfolded proteins, attacking nerve cell bodies in spinal cord and brain. Tends to involve weakness not numbness, and can affect legs and arms with flickering of muscles, loss of muscle mass, and evenually problems with breathing and swallowing. Unfortunately, there is no cure, and it preserves awareness. Gratefully, it is relatively rare. ...Read more

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Can temporal lobe epilepsy be cured?

Can temporal lobe epilepsy be cured?

Cured?: In the hands of an epilepsy specialized neurologist and a specialty trained neurosurgeon, it can be a well treated condition if the focus is truly in the medial temporal lobe and it can be resected. Only those specialists can tell you if the disease is treatable or possibly without symptoms- cured is the difficult word. ...Read more

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What is temporal arteritis?

What is temporal arteritis?

Inflammation: Temporal arteritis (ta) is a non-infectious inflammation of the temporal arteries, ususally seen in individuals over 50 yrs. Headache or head pains are the most common complaint, associated with tender temporal arteries. Other symptoms include jaw claudication, anorexia, fever, anemia and elevated wbc. An elevated sedimentation rate(esr) is typically above 80mm/hr, but ta can occur with normal esr. ...Read more

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What is temporal arteritis?

Artery inflammation: Also known as "giant cell arteritis" is an auto-immune disease characterized by inflammation of the vessels of the head and neck. Its cause is unknown. It is more common in women and usually is seen in the elderly. Definitive diagnosis requires removal of a portion of the superficial temporal artery and examination under a microscope looking for "giant cells" that are damaging the arteries. ...Read more

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Is multiple sclerosis hereditary?

Is multiple sclerosis hereditary?

Complex: Multiple sclerosis is an issue of genetic susceptibility, not the usual heredity, and risk runs about 3-5% if mother has it, 1-2% if father has it. But without specific environmental triggers, the disease will be unlikely to manifest. ...Read more

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Do people with temporal lobe epilepsy have Alzheimer's later?

Do people with temporal lobe epilepsy have Alzheimer's later?

Great question: Boston is a great town to keep track of this. This is a very sophisticated question. There are rare cases of "tle" in which an autoimmune encephalitis seems to be causitive. Some cases of autoimmune encephalitis are not monophasic, and can recur, with cumulative neuronal injury. It is possible but yet unknown if alzheimer-type pathology (amyloid plaques) would be accelerated in such cases. ...Read more

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Could temporal lobe epilepsy contribute towards schizophrenia?

No: But I have encountered several patients incorrectly diagnosed with schizophrenia who were instead suffering from undiagnosed and untreated focal epilepsy (TLE). Focal epilepsy can be very hard to spot, particularly if temporal or on undersurface of the brain. Continuous videotelemetry EEG (EMU) are key, though I have picked up several on routine EEG. ...Read more

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What is tubular sclerosis (or tuberous sclerosis)?

What is tubular sclerosis (or tuberous sclerosis)?

Neurological disorde: Tuberous sclerosis is a disorder involving brain structure, skin manifestations and cognitive function. Brain malformations called tubers are characteristic. Skin abnormalities of sebaceous adenomas and subungual fibromas. See a neurologist for more information. ...Read more

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MRI brain results Impression- there is cerebral atrophy with subcortical WMC, consistent wit microangiopathic disease, demyelination, or giliosis?

MRI brain results  Impression- there is cerebral atrophy with subcortical WMC, consistent wit microangiopathic disease, demyelination, or giliosis?

Covering the bases: That signal that is seen in patients who age is seen very frequently. Most of the time it is what has become known as microangiopathic disease or small vessel disease. Demyelination and gliosis come with a more notable history. Gliosis or scarring and demyelination also produces symptoms that MRI is useful for. Depends on why you had the MRI in the first place. The first entity more common than 2 ...Read more

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Optic neuritis (nmo) or multiple sclerosis (ms)? What are the different victims?

Optic neuritis (nmo) or multiple sclerosis (ms)? What are the different victims?

Say what???: This question is confusing! optic neuritis (abbreviated on) is one of many symptoms of ms and results from inflammation in one or both optic nerves. It is one of the most common symptoms of ms and typically causes eye pain and decreased vision in one eye. It does not typically cause complete blindness. Multiple sclerosis (ms) is an autoimmune disorder of the center nervous system. See below. ...Read more

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Is trigeminal neuralgia a symptom of multiple sclerosis?

Is trigeminal neuralgia a symptom of multiple sclerosis?

Possibly: Trigeminal neuralgia in a younger adult may be caused by multiple sclerosis. However, there must be more than just trigeminal neuralgia to define definite ms. History of other suspicious symptoms, abnormalities on neuro exam other than just trigeminal neuralgia and supplemental diagnostic studies will better define the suspicion for ms. ...Read more

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Frontal-temporal stroke. Does that involve broca's?

Frontal-temporal stroke. Does that involve broca's?

It could: A fronto-temporal stroke can involve the broca's region if it is on the dominant side of the brain. Most people's broca's (speech production center) is on the left. So a left fronto-temporal stroke can involve the broca's in the majority of people. ...Read more

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What disease might mimic multiple sclerosis?

What disease might mimic multiple sclerosis?

Several potentials: Cadasil, lupus, arteritis, clippers, pernicious anemia, cervical spondylosis, lyme disease, CNS lymphoma, sjogren's, melas. If you get the point, ms may be hard to diagnose, and often need to exclude other explanations. Patterns may or may not be different, and sometimes it is important to get testing and even several opinions. ...Read more

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My mother, 84, MRI scan> subacute infarcts, bilateral frontal lobes, small vessel ischematic changes inthe basal ganglia, periventricular white matter?

My mother, 84, MRI scan> subacute infarcts, bilateral frontal lobes, small vessel ischematic changes inthe basal ganglia, periventricular white matter?

Small vessel disease: Mri in a 84 years old lady showing infarcts and small vessel disease means she is having ministrokes. That is very common in that age group. If she has heart disease or carotid artery disease or risk factors like high BP or diabetes or high lipids they should be controlled and she should follow up with her dr who can give her further recommendations. ...Read more

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Will temporal lope epilepsy cause hypersexuality?

Will temporal lope epilepsy cause hypersexuality?

No.: There is no association between these conditions. One is neither the cause nor associated with the other. A distinct injury to the temporal lobe could conceivably result in both conditions, this would be very unlikely however. ...Read more

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