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Doctor insights on: Teen Pregnancy And Postpartum Depression

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Can pregnancy sleep patterns indicate the future onset postpartum depression?

Can pregnancy sleep patterns indicate the future onset postpartum depression?

Not necessarily: I need to have more information what you mean. If you aren't able to sleep (insomnia or early morning wakening with difficulty falling back to sleep) that may be a sign that some depression is starting. However, many pregnant women may have difficulty getting comfortable especially as they get larger or have to awaken to use the bathroom. So i would advise you to discuss this with your ob-gyne. ...Read more

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Dr. Pamela Pappas
4,493 doctors shared insights

Depression (Definition)

Depression is a mood disorder that can affect behavior and emotions. Symptoms of depression include feeling down most of the time, losing interest in previously enjoyable activities, increase or decrease in appetite or weight, sleeping more or less, becoming easily agitated or lethargic, feeling worthless, feeling guilty, having difficulty concentrating, thinking more about death and dying. Depression can sometimes result in suicidal thoughts and plans. In this case, emergent ...Read more


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What happens if postpartum depression is depression after pregnancy, what is depression during pregnancy called?

What happens if postpartum depression is depression after pregnancy, what is depression during pregnancy called?

Depression: Some people only have depression problems after a pregnancy, possibly increased risk because of the hormone changes. Some people have depression at other times, not due to a particular cause. If a woman is on antidepressants when she gets pregnant, she should talk with her doctor about the risks of taking them or not taking them during the pregnancy. ...Read more

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Can postpartum depression be prevented if it occurred in previous pregnancy?

Can postpartum depression be prevented if it occurred in previous pregnancy?

Good self care: There are things that you can do to help lower your risk of postpartum depression, but still no guarantees that you won't get it. If you do get ppd, seek early treatment as that's the best way to get better quickly. The good news is there's a good prognosis with treatment. Lower risk with a good support network & good self care, including good sleep, healthy eating, exercise, balanced lifestyle. ...Read more

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I feel like i'm going thru postpartum depression again. Is that normal after 2nd high-risk pregnancy?

I feel like i'm going thru postpartum depression again. Is that normal after 2nd high-risk pregnancy?

It's common: Postpartum depression is common for women who have experienced it before. Consider exploring support through your OB, psychiatrist, psychologist, mommy and me class. Postpartum international is a good resource. ...Read more

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How to help my wife with postpartum depression?

How to help my wife with postpartum depression?

Find a therapist.: In addition to being supportive and listening to your wife, it is important to get her help from a professional. Postpartum depression can last for years if left untreated and can become quite severe. Find a therapist that is experienced or ask your or her doctor for a referral. ...Read more

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How does postpartum depression affect my family?

How does postpartum depression affect my family?

Adds More Stress: Any illness puts a stress on a family balance. Having a baby puts a stress on a family as well (even if it's a positive stress). Every family deals differently with stress and any particular action by the family will be dependent on how family deals with stress during "bad" times. If you feel, you have post-partum depression, get evaluated, get treatment for your sake and sake of your child. ...Read more

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How do I know if I am at risk for postpartum depression?

How do I know if I am at risk for postpartum depression?

Know risk factors: Several risk factors can predispose women to ppd, including: *previous history of postpartum depression *symptoms of depression or severe anxiety during pregnancy *prior history of depression *significant pms or pmdd *lack of social support network *relationship problems *major psychosocial stressors *fertility issues may increase risk *history of physical and/or sexual abuse. ...Read more

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What should I do for my friend with postpartum depression?

What should I do for my friend with postpartum depression?

Support her: Support your friend by being present and willing to hear her feelings. Help with the infant, if appropriate. Encourage & help your friend to get professional care for her depression. Medicines (some are safe in breastfeeding) and talk therapy may help her. Help her reach out to others, like extended family who may not know what she needs. For education: http://tinyurl.Com/7onlu98. ...Read more

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Can postpartum depression cause women to feel changing emotions?

Yes: Post partum depression is often accompanied by anxiety. Anxiety over germ phobia, responsibilities of becoming a parent worrying about the child's health.Paranoid thoughts and delusions occur infrequently and require urgent care. ...Read more

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Could I be suffering from postpartum depression? How can I tell?

Not the baby blues: Postpartum depression develops 1 - 6 months after the birth of your baby. Symptoms last at least 2 weeks that include feeling depressed with at least 4 of the following: poor sleep, low energy, poor concentration, changes in appetite, feelings of excessive guilt, lack of enjoyment, moving slower of faster than normal, or suicidal thoughts. If you have any of these, seek professional assistance. ...Read more

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Dr. Tiffanie Noonan
4 doctors shared insights

Pregnancy (Definition)

When your due date arrives, you will be more than ready to have your baby! Most women deliver the baby somewhere between 37 and 42 weeks. According to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, only 5% of babies arrive on the exact due date. Approximately 7% of babies are not delivered by 42 weeks, and when that happens, it is referred to ...Read more


Dr. Jeff Livingston
54 doctors shared insights

Teen Pregnancy (Definition)

Teen pregnancy is a condition where a teenage female between the ages of 13 and 19 becomes pregnant. It is often associated with increased risks to the ...Read more