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Doctor insights on: Tachypnea

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Difference between hyperpnea, dyspne and tachypnea?

Difference between hyperpnea, dyspne and tachypnea?

Respiratory rate: Hyperpnea: increase depth of breathing. Dyspnea: feeling of shortness of breath tachypnea: increase respiratory rate. ...Read more

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Dr. Ira Friedlander
32 doctors shared insights

Fast Shallow Breathing (Definition)

Fast breathing means you are breathing faster than the normal rate, textbook is faster than 20. Shallow breathing means you are not taking as deep a breath as normal. By not breathing deep but breathing faster, you are maintaining ...Read more


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Whats tachypnea mean?

Whats tachypnea mean?

Fast breathing: Rapid rate of breathing - varies by age. ...Read more

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Difference between hyperpnea and tachypnea?

Difference between hyperpnea and tachypnea?

Fast/deep vs. fast: Tachypnea is a rapid breathing rate (normal is between 12-20 breaths/minute).Hyperpnea is deeper and more rapid breathing than at rest as occurs, for example with exercise. Neither rapid nor deeper breathing necessarily increases alveolar ventilation which is the amount of air that actually reaches the air sacs to deliver oxygen. If airways are blocked fast and deep breaths dont reach air sacs. ...Read more

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What is tachypnea?

What is tachypnea?

Rapid vs Short: Tachypnea is breathing rapidly, while dyspnea represents shortness of breath. They commonly occur together. ...Read more

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Hyperinflated lungs. FVC 123% predicted, FEV1 115% predicted. FEV1/FVC 93% predicted. DLCO 81% predicted. SOB. COPD diagnosis?

Hyperinflated lungs.  FVC 123% predicted, FEV1 115% predicted. FEV1/FVC 93% predicted. DLCO 81% predicted. SOB. COPD diagnosis?

See below: None of the numbers you mentioned indicate hyperinflation . that number is from the TLC. All the numbers you listed appear normal (except the FVC, which is just a little high - we don't worry about high - it means nothing). Nothing you listed suggests COPD either - not even remotely close. ...Read more

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Difference between shallow breaths and tachypnea?

Shallow versus fast: Shallow breaths are less deep and can be completley normal. Tachypnea is fast breathing, generally breathing above 30 breaths per minute in an adult. If you are breathing very shallow breaths you will probably also breathe faster than normal so you could often have shallow breathing and tachypnea or fast breathing at the same time. ...Read more

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What causes tachypnea and tachycardia with pneumonia?

What causes tachypnea and tachycardia with pneumonia?

Normal physiology: Tachypnea (fast breathing) and tachycardia (fast heart beat) are both common in patients with pneumonia. Fast breathing is due to impaired gas exchange in the lungs related to the infection, and will improve as the infection is treated. Fast heartbeat is related to the increased adrenaline and sometimes a bit of dehydration associated with the fever that often accompanies the infection. ...Read more

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What causes tachypnea and tachycardia in bacterial pneumonia?

What causes tachypnea and tachycardia in bacterial pneumonia?

Several things: The cause of tachypnea and tachycardia would be the increase in inflammatory mediators seen in infection and catecholamine levels associated with the stress response. There may also be lower levels of oxygenation and increased work of breathing. If there is some degree of respiratory muscle fatigue, then this stimulates rapid shallow breathing as well. The exact mechanisms are not well understood. ...Read more

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Is nocturnal dyspnea deadly?

Is nocturnal dyspnea deadly?

General no..: Generally no but this is a serious symptom which requires further evaluation to determine & treat underlying cause. Talk to your physician. ...Read more

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What's cheyne-stokes respiration?

What's cheyne-stokes respiration?

Abnormal breathing: Cheyne-stokes respiration is an abnormal breathing pattern where the patient has very deep breathing (sometimes with increased respiratory rate) that gradually slows down until the patient stops breathing, and the cycle repeats (usually over a 30-120 second cycle). Some of the causes include: congestive heart failure, stroke, head injury, and brain tumors. ...Read more

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What is inspiratory wheezing?

What is  inspiratory wheezing?

Severe wheezing: Wheezing is typically heard on expiration - when breathing out. Inspiratory wheezing - wheezing when breathing in - usually occurs with severe asthma. Another sound heard on inspiration is called stridor. Stridor sounds like crowing and indicates obstruction around the vocal cords. Severe airway obstruction in croup or laryngospasm generates stridor. Wheezing occurs further down in the bronchi. ...Read more

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Whooping cough as a post-viral phenomrnon. Breath shortness, lack of sleep?

Whooping cough as a post-viral phenomrnon. Breath shortness, lack of sleep?

Possible: Two simple tests, the direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) test on the nasal secretions, and CBC with differential, as well as the 3 classic symptoms - 1) 'whoop' noise with inspiration after cough, 2) paroxysms of coughing, or many back to back cough episodes without a break, and post-coughing vomiting, all help to make the diagnosis ...Read more

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Severe SOB, chestpain, sudden paralaysis in legs/arms, high/weak heartrate, bloating, barrel chest, nail clubbing. Normal spirometry, ecg, echo.

Severe SOB, chestpain, sudden paralaysis in legs/arms, high/weak heartrate, bloating, barrel chest, nail clubbing. Normal spirometry, ecg, echo.

Severe SOB: and chest pain are very serious symptoms. Basic in diagnoisi is doing a Chest X ray, Oxygen Sat. and Blood tests and CT scan of the chest (if xray is equivocal or negative). Since the ECG and Echo are normnal, I think we are faced with a Respiratory disorder. Please see a pulmonologist. ...Read more

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What is neonatal respiratory distress syndrome?

What is neonatal respiratory distress syndrome?

Premature lung: Prematures lack surfactant which is essential to keep alveoli expanded. This results in gradual collapse of more and more alveoli, (atelectasis) making it more difficult to oxygenate the blood. This becomes hyaline membrane disease or neonatal respiratory distress syndrome. ...Read more

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What causes pulseless ventricular tachycardia?

What causes pulseless ventricular tachycardia?

Not really pulseless: When VT occurs at a fast enough rate, there is inadequate time for ventricular filling, cardiac output falls, and blood pressure falls. You may not be able to palpate a pulse but an arterial line would show a waveform that is reduced in amplitude. Rate is the key. As tissue perfusion fails, acidosis, hypoxemia and hyperkalemia result leading to ventricular fibrillation and death. ...Read more

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Explain hypoxia vs hypoxemia?

Explain hypoxia vs hypoxemia?

Tissues vs. blood: Hypoxia is low oxygen in the tissues. Hypoxemia is low oxygen in the arterial blood. Hypoxemia caused by low oxygen in air (such as high altitude), low ventilation (slow breathing oversedation), lung disease or blood clots in lung. Low oxygen in arterial blood leads to low oxygen in tissues but hypoxia can also be due to anemia (less oxygen carrying capacity by blood), carbon monoxide poisoning. ...Read more

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What is acute respiratory distress syndrome ards?

What is acute respiratory distress syndrome ards?

Severe SOB: ARDS is severe shortness of breath caused by an insult and inflamatory response to the lungs. Its not cardiogenic and can be infectious, toxic, or autoimmmune.Some pts need to placed on a ventilator while recovering.Breathing treatments, antiobiotics, steroids as needed.The source should be sought out to target therapy. ...Read more

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Is supraventricular tachycardia deadly?

Is supraventricular tachycardia deadly?

Not usually: Svt should no be deadly. If it lasts for a long time(many hours or days), the heart can get tired and that is potentially dangerous. ...Read more

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Dr. Cornelius O'leary jr
39 doctors shared insights