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Doctor insights on: Synapse

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What is a excitatory synapse?

What is a excitatory synapse?

Neuron junctions.: Synapses are junctions between neurons, or nerve cells. Nerves transmit signals throughout the body, & synapses are gates where chemical signals are transduced to electrical ones. Synapses may be simply described as excitatory or inhibitory, and often depends on the neurotransmitter involved. For example, excitation of the heart and inhibition of the gut are part of the fight or flight response. ...Read more

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How can nerve signals pass through the synapse?

How can nerve signals pass through the synapse?

Electro-chemical: Many neurotransmitters, both excitatory and inhibitory play a major role in nerve-nerve communication in brain and spinal cord. Simplest model is the Neuro-muscular junction, where at the tip of the axon, there is a release of acetylcholine, which reaches the postsynaptic muscle receptor, causing muscle contraction. ...Read more

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What happens to serotonin at the synapse?

What happens to serotonin at the synapse?

Activates neurons: Serotonin is a neurotransmitter in the brain and intestine. It reacts with cells' receptors to signal a neuron to fire. Depending on what nerve cell it activates, there are many potential effects-- it may affect cognition, mood, anxiety, sexuality, nausea, and so on. ...Read more

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The absence or inhibition of acetycholinesterase at a synapse would lead to what?

The absence or inhibition of acetycholinesterase at a synapse would lead to what?

The most common...: cause of of this is an autoimmune disease called myasthenia gravis. Antibodies are formed that block the acetylcholine from making it across the synapse to bind on its receptors. ...Read more

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What is the difference between dendrite, ganglion, synapse?

What is the difference between dendrite, ganglion, synapse?

Anatomy of neuron: All these are anatomy ( and physiology ) of neuron or nerve cell. 'dendrite' is branched projections of neuron which receives electrical signals, when a group of neurons are clumped together the site is called 'ganglion', and the ' synapse' is the junction of neuron that communicates with the target cell ( or other neuron) by releasing a chemical transmitter to activate the other cell. ...Read more

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What do you call the synapse of the olfactory nerves with the mitral cells?

What do you call the synapse of the olfactory nerves with the mitral cells?

Olfactor: Look at this, I don't think you meant 'mitral' but can't figure out what you meant to type ?antral. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olfactory_nerve ...Read more

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What happens when I don't have enough serotonin in my brain synapses?

What happens when I don't have enough serotonin in my brain synapses?

Serotonin: Some symptoms would include being anxious in typically low stress situations, being impatient, fatigue, can't focus, sugar cravings, aches. ...Read more

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Does Zoloft (sertraline) increase or decrease the amount of dopamine available in your synapses?

Does Zoloft (sertraline) increase or decrease the amount of dopamine available in your synapses?

Dopamine: Although sertraline does act as an inhibitor of dopamine reuptake – it does not bind the dopamine tightly. It primarily acts on serotonin reuptake. ...Read more

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Can you tell me how l-dopa effect the actions of neurotransmitters at the synapse in Parkinson's patients?

Can you tell me how l-dopa effect the actions of neurotransmitters at the synapse in Parkinson's patients?

Explanation: Although Parkinson's is a multi-neurotransmitter deficiency disorder, the main focus involves a dopamine deficiency within the basal ganglia. L-DOPA is a precursor, which is transformed within the body to dopamine after ingestion, and supplements the deficiency present in the substantia nigra which improves communication with areas such as putamen and globus pallidus. ...Read more