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Doctor insights on: Symptoms Of Aids Hiv Human Immunodeficiency Virus

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Explan why one human immunodeficiency virus test cannot definitely diagnose hiv?

Explan why one human immunodeficiency virus test cannot definitely diagnose hiv?

Good question: The HIV test to which you refer is an elisa assay which is quite sensitive but not as specific as the confirmatory western blot. These measure the presence of antibodies to the HIV and these may take from 2 wks to several months to develop. If you run the test before the antibodies have appeared, it will be negative, only to change to positive once antibody formation has occurred. ...Read more

Dr. Abraham Jaskiel
16 doctors shared insights

Hiv (Definition)

Hiv infection is caused by a retrovirus....This retrovirus binds to CD4 cells (for the most part). You may detect the virus by several different methods. An elisa test (enzyme linked immunosorbent assay). You may also detect it by doing a test referred to as a western blot (a gel protein electrophoresis). Thirdly by pcr (polymerase chain reaction) which ...Read more


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How does the human immunodeficiency virus cause AIDS?

How does the human immunodeficiency virus cause AIDS?

Attacks T cells: T lymphocytes, part of the white blood cells, are the main cells in the specialized immune system, Especially the T helper cells, so when attacked the HIV virus, the whole immune system becomes deranged, hence the development of AIDS, ...Read more

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Human immunodeficiency virus--does it lead to any diseases besides aids?

Human immunodeficiency virus--does it lead to any diseases besides aids?

Yes: In addition to causing aids, we now know that HIV also increases chronic inflammation and immune activation, which can increase the risk of complications like coronary heart disease, malignancies, decreased bone density, and cognitive dyfunction. There is a lot of interest now in HIV as a cause of earlier complications of the aging process. ...Read more

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What symptoms are caused by the human immunodeficiency virus?

What symptoms are caused by the human immunodeficiency virus?

Many and few.: At the outset the patient infected may not even be aware of the presence of the virus, and this can persist until the immune system is badly damaged, and secondary infections or cancers occur (8-12 yrs). Sometimes, acute HIV syndrome will present as a mononucleosis-type illness with multiple symptoms. Best thing to do is get checked and tested if you feel you have been exposed. ...Read more

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Can you tell me if i could possibly have HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) ?

Can you tell me if i could possibly have HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) ?

HIV: Hiv can be transmitted via anal ; oral sex, blood transfusion, use of contaminated needles, breastfeeding ; during pregnancy ; delivery. Do you engage in behaviors that put you at risk? ...Read more

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Could i obtain the human immunodeficiency virus (hiv) from eating after someone that has it?

Could i obtain the human immunodeficiency virus (hiv) from eating after someone that has it?

No: You can get HIV from blood or bodily fluid transfusions or organ transplant or sexually intercourse. Casual contact such as food sharing or light touch or kiss has not lead to HIV transmission ...Read more

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How is the human immunodeficiency virus (hiv) transmitted to heterosexuals?

Same as heterosex: Hiv is transmitted by the virus present in body secretions deposited onto areas of either mucous membranes (rectal mucosa, oral mucosa or tonsils) where there are receptor sites to which the virus attaches. There are some forms of sexual activity in which individuals are more prone to bleeding, in which case these bleeding sites present a rapid route for viral entry. ...Read more

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The human immunodeficiency virus (hiv) infects helper t cells. What is the role of these cells?

The human immunodeficiency virus (hiv) infects helper t cells. What is the role of these cells?

Cellular immunity: These are cells that work as part of the cellular immune system, fighting certain fungal (e.g. Cryptococcus), viral (e.g. Herpesviruses), parastic (e.g. Toxoplasma), and bacterial (e.g. Tuberulosis) infections. The cellular immune system also helps to prevent certain cancers, such as lymphomas. ...Read more

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How did human immunodeficiency virus (hiv) evolve?

Evolution: It came from a simian precursor transmitted to humans by one of several mechanisms. This virus mutates continuously and the form to which it mutates which is best capable of surviving under the circumstances is the one which will be reproduced and multiply within infected cells. Unless of course you are a creationist. ...Read more

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How is the human immunodeficiency virus (hiv) transmitted?

Sharing body fluids: Hiv is a sexually transmitted infection. It can also be spread by contact with infected blood, or from mother to child during pregnancy, childbirth or breast-feeding. It can take years before HIV weakens the immune system to the point that the patient has aids. There is no cure for hiv/aids, but there are medications that can dramatically slow the progression of the disease. ...Read more

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How to know if I have hiv's (human immunodeficiency virus)?

Get tested.: The only way to know if you have HIV is to get tested for hiv. Please visit with a clinic or doctor and have testing performed. The clinic or doctor will explain the results and be able to answer questions. To decrease risk, always use clean (single use) needles for injection drugs and always have 'safe' sex with a condom and spermicidal lubricant. Be well. ...Read more

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How is the human immunodeficiency virus (hiv) transmitted easiest?

Blood: Tainted blood transfusions are the easiest way to become infected with hiv. In the developed world, all blood is screened for HIV and blood transfusions are safe. Other high risk activities include sharing needles for intravenous drug use with infected individuals and having unprotected receptive anal intercourse with an HIV infected person. ...Read more

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How has human immunodeficiency virus (hiv) evolved since late 1970s?

How has human immunodeficiency virus (hiv) evolved since late 1970s?

Probably not: The virus itself probably hasn't evolved much. What has evolved is our ability to treat it. Resistance mutations occur, but this sort of evolution affects individuals and sometimes the people they infect. It has not resulted in global evoluation of the virus. ...Read more

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Explan why one human immunodeficiency virus test cannot definitely diagnose hiv?

Good question: The HIV test to which you refer is an elisa assay which is quite sensitive but not as specific as the confirmatory western blot. These measure the presence of antibodies to the HIV and these may take from 2 wks to several months to develop. If you run the test before the antibodies have appeared, it will be negative, only to change to positive once antibody formation has occurred. ...Read more

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Test for or infection with human immunodeficiency virus hiv?

Test for or infection with human immunodeficiency virus hiv?

HIV testing: There are several HIV tests. We usually check what is called an elisa blood/oral test. It's very sensitive & specific but misses early, early infection (<15-20 days). In us we confirm a + elisa w/a test called a western blot (looks for HIV specific proteins). Other countries just use elisa x2. For acute HIV infection we measure viral RNA in blood. Can be falsely + so needs expert evaluation. ...Read more

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Human immunodeficiency virus--can it mutate?

Human immunodeficiency virus--can it mutate?

Yes: Hiv mutates in response to HIV therapy. If you're being treated without a complete response (partial suppression), the virus can mutate so it can replicate in the presence of the drugs. This usually happens in people who don't take their medications properly. They can then transmit the mutant virus to others. Spontaneous mutation (mutation independent of therapy) has not been a big problem. ...Read more

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What causes the human immunodeficiency virus?

What causes the human immunodeficiency virus?

HIV: The obvious answer is that HIV causes it. But perhaps you meant "how do you get it?" you get HIV by having unsafe sex or by sharing needles/syringes by someone else who has it. ...Read more

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What all is caused by the human immunodeficiency virus?

HIV infection/AIDS: The HIV virus causes HIV infection and aids. There are many clinical manifestations of HIV infection and aids, which are too numerous to list here. ...Read more

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What is the definition or description of: human immunodeficiency virus?

More precisly: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a lentivirus (a member of the retrovirus family) that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (aids), [1][2] a condition in humans in which progressive failure of the immune system allows life-threatening opportunistic infections and cancers to thrive. ...Read more

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If a cure were to be discovered for human immunodeficiency virus, what would it do?

HOPEFULLY GO AWAY: Viruses are not cognitive creatures. If we were to devise some means of eradicating the infection they would either mutate to a form which would again produce disease, or disappear or become a benign commensal. Philosophically, it has been said that infections are a result of two biological beings coming in contact with each other and yet not finding full compatibility, which hopefully changes. ...Read more

Dr. Ed Friedlander
1,471 doctors shared insights

Human Immunodeficiency Virus (Definition)

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a lentivirus (a member of the retrovirus family) that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (aids), [1][2] a condition in humans in which progressive failure of the immune system allows life-threatening opportunistic infections ...Read more


Dr. Dawn Sokol
138 doctors shared insights

Weak Immune System (Definition)

that's when a person has a weakened immune system from whatever reason: drugs, infection, malnutrition, etc. While immunodeficiency, is when an arm of the immune system is weakened or absent, can be something primary (born with) or secondary (acquired later in life) ...Read more