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Doctor insights on: Superior Oblique Palsy

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Palsy (Definition)

...is a corruption of French "paralise" from Latinized Greek "paralysis." In the old days it meant any kind of persistent weakness. To this day Parkinson's disease is also called "paralysis agitans" which is a Latin translation of Dr. Parkinson's original name for it, the "shaking palsy." We've obviously reborrowed the full form "paralysis" into English as well; today ...Read more


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What is some basic info on superior oblique myokymia?

What is some basic info on superior oblique myokymia?

Visual disturbance: Condition presents as repeated, brief episodes of movement, shimmering or shaking of the vision of one eye, a feeling of the eye trembling, or vertical/tilted vision. Neurovascular compression of the trochlear nerve (cranial nerve 4), which controls the movement of the superior oblique muscles causes this condition. Treatment with meds or surgery. ...Read more

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Action of superior oblique eye muscle is down and out, but h test diagram show so down and in. Why the seeming discreptancy?

Action of superior oblique eye muscle is down and out, but h test diagram show so down and in. Why the seeming discreptancy?

The SO has...: Maximum depression when the lr is contracted. However its pure function is internal rotation, therefore if cn 4 were out only the so would be out. This would eliminate internal rotation that could not be compensated by medial rectus and inferior rectus. ...Read more

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How long does bruising to the superior oblique eye muscle take to heal?

How long does bruising to the superior oblique eye muscle take to heal?

Varies: Superior oblique muscle bruising is an ophthalmic diagnosis, therefore your eye doctor that diagnosed it; is best to ask. Superior oblique can get scarring and cause brown syndrome with double vision that is hard to treat. Must consult a local ophthalmologist on this. ...Read more

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Can bell's palsy reoccur?

Can bell's palsy reoccur?

Yes but rare: Bell's palsy can recur but this is rare. Recurrent facial paralysis or weakness may be more commonly related to a tumor growth, infection or a nerve disorder. This should be carefully evaluated by a neurologist of ENT specialist. ...Read more

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How rare is bulbar palsy?

How rare is bulbar palsy?

Not a disease itself: Bulbar palsy is an assortment of signs and symptoms, not the name of a precise disease. It refers to impairment of function of the cranial nerves ix, x, xi and xii. Its causes are many but here are a few:
acute intermittent porphyria, motor neuron disease (als), guillain barre syndome, lyme's disease, botulinism, and myastheinia gravis. ...Read more

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How common is bell's palsy?

Not very: Bells palsy is not as uncommon as is generally believed. Worldwide statistics set the frequency at just over. 02% of the population (with geographical variations). In human terms this is 1 of every 5000 people over the course of a lifetime and 40, 000 americans every year. (courtesy of the bells palsy web site). ...Read more

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How can I treat bell's palsy?

How can I treat bell's palsy?

Couple of ways: Treatments for bell's palsy include ensuring protection for your eyes [make sure that they are kept moist and protected]. Sometimes physicians will prescribe steroids [to reduce possible swelling] or antivirals [if it is suspected that the bell's palsy was triggered by a virus]. If you suspect that you have bell's palsy, see your doctor to determine the right course of treatment. ...Read more

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How does bell's palsy progress?

How does bell's palsy progress?

Variable: The course of bell's palsy varies from person to person. It is thought to be due to a viral infection that causes swelling in the facial nerve and leads to weakness or paralysis of the facial muscles. This can occur over the course of hours or days. Fortunately, most people recover normal facial function but this can be permanent. ...Read more

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How long could bells palsy last?

Bell's Palsy: Bell's palsy is a condition which affects the nerve that controls the muscles of the face, mouth and eyelids. It usually only affects one side and often resolves in weeks. Some people have more chronic problems with facial muscle weakness. ...Read more

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How is third nerve palsy diagnosed?

How is third nerve palsy diagnosed?

History and exam: Typically the diagnosis of a third nerve palsy is made by a history of double vision and then a clinical exam that demonstrates and abnormality of the opening of the eyelid (ptosis), the pupillary size (bigger) and/or the eye movement. Imaging may be useful for uncovering the cause, but the diagnosis is made clinically. ...Read more

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How likely is bell's palsy to recur?

Depends: A recurrence is more likley if you become pregnant, develop diabetes, or are under significant emotional stress. Complete remission is likely if your symptoms resolved within 2 weeks of onset or if the episode occurred in children under 10 years old. ...Read more

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What happens to people with bell's palsy?

Several things: Other than the obvious facial weakness causing cosmetic problems there are other things: 1. Can't close eye - this will dry out the cornea, lead to abrasions and possibly blindness if not treated; 2. Speech difficulty as the lips will be paralyzed and unable to help form sounds; 3. Eating difficulties - along with #2, weak lips will cause food to drip out of the mouth. ...Read more

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Do you have information about bells palsy?

See an ENT: Bell's palsy is a diagnosis of exclusion - meaning that diagnosis is only given when the precise cause of facial paralysis cannot be definitively given. You should see a doctor familiar with all causes. Fortunately most are of viral origin and self limited with full to near full recovery expected. However rarer causes like benign tumors, stroke, lyme disease etc etc must be ruled out. See an ent. ...Read more

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What are my chances of recovering from C5 palsy?

That depends: It is really hard to say without more information. What and how severe was the initial cause, and how long it has been since the cause? That being said, many cases recover within weeks, but it can take months. After 6 months further recovery is unusual but not impossible. ...Read more

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What parts of the body are affected by bell's palsy?

Facial nerve: Bell's palsy is defined as unilateral (one side) paralysis of the seventh cranial nerve, which controls facial movement. Patients have droopy face on that side. There may also be loss of taste and more sensitive hearing on same side. ...Read more

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What are some of the possible causes of bell's palsy?

Multiple: Facial nerve pressure, viruses such as herpes simplex, cold sores, herpes zoster, epstein-barr, rubella, (german measles), mumps virus, tumors and strokes, are all thought to be possible causes. ...Read more

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How to keep incipient bell's palsy from getting worse?

Work up & treatment: You need to be evaluated for infectious causes. If negative, a dose of steroids can be tried. Often this is given with an anti-viral drug or antibiotic based on your lab tests, and present and past medical history. ...Read more

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What is the definition or description of: Bell's palsy?

Bell's palsy: Bell's palsy = paralysis of facial nerve on one side of the face. See: http://www. Mayoclinic. Org/diseases-conditions/bells-palsy/basics/definition/CON-20020529. ...Read more

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What conditions increase the risk of having bell's palsy?

Several: People with diabetes have been shown to be at a significantly increased risk for developing bell's palsy - a dysfunction of the facial nerve causing paralysis in one half of the face. Other conditions associated with increased risk of this condition include pregnancy, especially when pre-ecclampsia is present, and possibly autoimmune diseases and infections, particularly viral. Thanks to d. Jones. ...Read more

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If my fiance has cerebal palsy, would my future baby have it to?

If my fiance has cerebal palsy, would my future baby have it to?

No....: Cerebral palsy is caused by low oxygen to the brain due to multiple reasons, including a bleed into brain, period of anoxia or hypoxia (no or low oxygen) to brain; this may occur in utero to the fetus, or an injury during or after birth. It may be anything from a very mild neurologic impairment to severe brain damage. It does not, in and of itself affect fertility, and should not be hereditary. ...Read more

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Please help! What is the difference betweeen bells palsy and ramseys hunt syndrome?

Herpes: Herpes oticus, also called ramsay hunt syndrome (an old term), is a infection of the facial nerve by the chicken pox virus, herpes zoster. It is painful. Bell's palsy is a dysfunction of the facial nerve of unknown cause. There is typically no pain with a bell's palsy. ...Read more

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Is erb palsy painful?

Is erb palsy painful?

It can be: The nerve damage can result in discomfort. We do occasionally need to treat the children with codeine.

Watch http://www. Youtube. Com/watch? V=b68jtv0-teo to learn a little more. ...Read more

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Is bell's palsy contagious?

Is bell's palsy contagious?

No: Even though some believe a viral infection plays a role in bell's palsy, the "disease" is not contagious. ...Read more

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What is pseudobulbar palsy?

Pseudobulbar Palsy: Pseudobulbar palsy refers to a syndrome that appears to affect the brain stem. The cluster of symptoms include dysarthria, dysphagia and uncontrolled emotional outbursts. There are many neurological causes of pseudobulbar palsy. ...Read more

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What's pseudo bulbar palsy?

Read below: Bulbar palsy is a term for problems arising from at the bulb (medulla oblangata), the lowermost part of the brain stem or peripheral to the bulb (nerve or muscle) pseudobulbar palsy is when the same symptoms (difficulty with swallowing speech etc) are due to bilateral problems higher up in the central nervous system. The physical signs are different. ...Read more

Dr. William Singer
1,058 Doctors shared insights

Paralysis (Definition)

A paralyzed limb cannot be voluntarily moved, and the term reflects leg involvement, paraplegia, full body, quadriplegia, and less than full, tetraplegia. Causes can be many, including stroke, trauma, ...Read more