Top
30
Doctor insights on: Streptococcus Pyogenes Habitat

Share

Streptococcus (Definition)

Is a group of bacteria that grown in long chains of cocci (round cells). They are classified in part by whether they hemolyze sheep red blood cells completely, partial or not at all. The beta (complete) hemolysis ones are further classified by their capsules and the prototype is group a streptococci, that cause strep throat and rheumatic fever. The Alpha (partial) ...Read more


2

2
Explain why streptococcus pyogenes is important?

Human pathogen.: Streptococcus pyogenes is a very important human pathogenic bacteria. It is the cause of "strep throat" and it's sequella rheumatic fever and glomerulnephritis. It also causes streptococcal necrotizing fasciitis "flesh eating bug" infections and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. It also causes infections at many other anatomical sites. ...Read more

3

3
What illness is causes by streptococcus pyogenes?

What illness is causes by streptococcus pyogenes?

A variety: The most common is strep throat but is a common cause of cellulitis and can cause necrotizing fascititis. ...Read more

4

4
What diseases are caused by streptococcus pyogenes?

See below: Consult this site for information on this topic:
http://www. Textbookofbacteriology. Net/streptococcus.html

For good health - Have a diet rich in fresh vegetables, fruits, whole grains, milk and milk products, nuts, beans, legumes, lentils and small amounts of lean meats. Avoid saturated fats. Drink enough water daily, so that your urine is mostly colorless. Exercise at least 150 minutes/week and increase the intensity of exercise gradually. Do not use tobacco, alcohol, weed or street drugs in any form.
Practice safe sex, if you have sex. ...Read more

6

6
What kinds of damage does streptococcus pyogenes cause to the human body?

What kinds of damage does streptococcus pyogenes cause to the human body?

Strep complications: Streptococcus pyogenes, the bacterial cause of "strep throat", can invade other organ systems and cause infection in in areas around the tonsils, lymph glands in the neck, middle ear, mastoid regions, sinuses, bones, lungs (pneumonia), kidneys and liver (toxic shock syndrome). The noninfectious complications include rheumatic fever, rheumatic heart disease and acute glomerulonephritis (kidneys). ...Read more

7

7
Rheumatic fever caused by streptococcus pyogenes is most likely from what?

Rheumatic fever caused by streptococcus pyogenes is most likely from what?

Auto-immune response: The body responds to strep and some of the immune response reacts with heart and other organs. Usually it follows strep throat infection. It can be prevented by prompt antibiotic treatment of strep throat infection. ...Read more

8

8
How does streptococcus pyogenes cause the necrotising fasciitis infection?

How does streptococcus pyogenes cause the necrotising fasciitis infection?

Tissue Invasion: Strep can invade normal tissue which makes it potentially very dangerous. Necrotizing faciitis is typically multiple bacteria working together. ...Read more

9

9
When infected with streptococcus pyogenes bacterium, how come lungs sound wet on ausculation?

When infected with streptococcus pyogenes bacterium, how come lungs sound wet on ausculation?

Inflammation: In many pneumonias inflammation causes fluid to exude into the alveoli and bronchioles causing wet rales and rhonchi. ...Read more

10

10
How can you get streptococcus mitis?

Normal flora: Streptococcus mitis is commonly present in the mouth, gastrointestinal tract, female genital tract, and skin. It is part of our "normal flora;" the bacteria that are normally present in human beings. Occasionally, it can cause infection (endocarditis, dental infections, meningitis), but infections are unlikely unless the immune system is depressed. ...Read more

11

11
How do you get streptococcus faecalis?

Normal flora: Enterococcus faecalis is part of your intestinal flora and is an example of several species that cross the line from symbiosis and colonization to pathogenicity and infection under certain circumstances and causes endocarditis, infects root canals, and causes urinary tract infections and sepsis. Many times it is a nosocomial or hospital acquired infection able to elude the immune system and abx. ...Read more

12

12
Where can streptococcus faecalis be found?

Colon: It is part of the normal flora of the human colon. ...Read more

13

13
What is group g streptococcus? Does this infect humans?

Yes: Please consult this site for information on this topic:
https://wwwnc. Cdc. Gov/eid/article/15/6/08-0666_article
For good health - Have a diet rich in fresh vegetables, fruits, whole grains, milk and milk products, nuts, beans, legumes, lentils and small amounts of lean meats. Avoid saturated fats. Drink enough water daily, so that your urine is mostly colorless. Exercise at least 150 minutes/week and increase the intensity of exercise gradually. Do not use tobacco, alcohol, weed or street drugs in any form.
Practice safe sex, if you have sex. ...Read more

14

14
Is streptococcus anginosus contagious?

Is streptococcus anginosus contagious?

Yes: Transfer of these bacteria from one person to another is frequent but it doesn't necessary lead to infection. I would avoid kissing and coughing into someone's face. General precautions like that. ...Read more

15

15
Does streptococcus have hemolytic properties?

Some types do: There are many different types of streptococci and some have hemolytic properties. See this site for more details:

http://emedicine. Medscape. Com/article/228936-overview ...Read more

17

17
How do one get viridans streptococcus in urine?

Blood culture please: Most of the time viridans group streptococcus in the urine is of no importance, it is not usually the root cause of a UTI and often a contaminant. However, in a small number of patients, it may be a sign of a systemic infection with streptococcus such as endocarditis. Please ask your doctor to order two sets of blood cultures. ...Read more

18

18
What type of antibody is involved in streptococcus?

What type of antibody is involved in streptococcus?

Many: Streptococcal infection leads to the production of many antibodies. The one commonly used to assess such infection is antibody to Steptolysin O. See this site for more info:
https://www. Nlm. Nih. Gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003522.htm ...Read more

19

19
Are streptococcus mutans the same as oral cavities?

Are streptococcus mutans the same as oral cavities?

Not exactly: Strep mutans is one type of bacteria that naturally lives in the mouth and which can cause cavities. ...Read more

20

20
Why are streptococcus and lactobacillus so important to humans?

They really aren't: Strep bacteria often hurt us, causing heart infections, rheumatic fever, tooth decay, and soft tissue infections. If you get involved with cults about stool microbes, they'll tell you that you need to eat special foods loaded with these microbes or your normal body flora and overall health will be ruined. This isn't my focus, but most of these claims seem overstated to me. ...Read more

21

21
Dr. Ohira's Probiotic contains Streptococcus. Is this safe to take?

Dr. Ohira's Probiotic contains Streptococcus. Is this safe to take?

Safe and beneficial: The form of streptococcus in many probiotics (and yogurts) is streptococcus thermophilus, considered a friendly bacteria that is a normal part of healthy intestinal flora. This is a very different strain of strep than pathogenic alpha and beta-hemolytic streptococci that cause infections.
See http://www.probiotic.org/streptococcus-thermophilus. Htm ...Read more

22

22
How does streptococcus mutans (cavities) start and how does it spread?

Mother to child: It is believed that mother to child is how strep mutans is passed on. In some countries people don't get tooth decay. So, those people don't have strep mutans. ...Read more

23

23
Hi, what does group b streptococcus and scanty growth mean? I was told I have the bacteria.

Hi, what does group b streptococcus and scanty growth mean? I was told I have the bacteria.

Colonization: It means that you have been colonized by that strain of the bacteria. It only means you will need antibiotics when you deliver, but it does not otherwise cause you any problems, just your infant if they are exposed. ...Read more

24

24
Please tell me about group g streptococcus, what is it, what are the symptoms from infection?

Please tell me about group g streptococcus, what is it, what are the symptoms from infection?

See below: These organisms cause infections similar to other streptococci. See this site for more info.

http://wwwnc. Cdc. Gov/eid/article/15/6/08-0666_article ...Read more

25

25
Does a high aslo mean just streptococcus or could it be other infections that make aslo high?

Nonspecific: Many people run a high antistreptolysin o for no obvious reason and it means nothing unless the levels are rising or very high. Like most lab tests, it's meaningless in the absence of a clinical history. ...Read more

26

26
Is the flesh eating streptococcus group a contagious?

Clusters may occur: Certainly group a streptococcus or gas (streptococcus pyogenes) can spread from one person to another, gas clusters of necrotizing fasciitis are uncommon but not unhear of. ...Read more

28

28
How do humans catch streptococcus bovis?

How do humans catch streptococcus bovis?

Normal flora: Despite the name, which suggests a connection with cattle, the little "green" streptococcus often hangs out in the mouth as a normal inhabitant. ...Read more

29

29
What is the definition or description of: streptococcus?

Streptococcus: Is a group of bacteria that grown in long chains of cocci (round cells). They are classified in part by whether they hemolyze sheep red blood cells completely, partial or not at all. The beta (complete) hemolysis ones are further classified by their capsules and the prototype is group a streptococci, that cause strep throat and rheumatic fever. The Alpha (partial) strep cause heart infection. ...Read more

30

30
What are the morphology, biochemical test and culture of streptococcus?

Streptococcus: The streptococci are a diverse group of bacteria that are all gram-positive small round organisms often seen in chains on Gram's staining. They are easy to culture on standard media, but some may require reduced redox potentials for optimum growth. They can be further classified by the type of hemolysis, their serology and so forth. You need a course in microbiology. ...Read more