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Doctor insights on: Smoking And Bone Density

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Why is bone density important?

Why is bone density important?

For multiple reasons: Achieving the potential peak bone mass during adolescence, and maintaining it during the adulthood is very important for preventing future fractures. There are many diseases, medications, lifestyle habits, and food components can adversely affect the bone density and the bone quality leading to fragility (osteoporotic) fractures. If one takes proactive actions, most of these are preventable. ...Read more

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Bone (Definition)

Bone is a living growing tissue made mostly of collagen (protein that provides soft framework) & the mineral calcium phosphate that adds strength & hardens the framework. Two types of bone are found in the body; cortical (dense compact outer layer) & trabecular (makes up inner layer, ...Read more


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What would keep a person's bone density levels from dropping?

What would keep a person's bone density levels from dropping?

Exercise and diet: Regular exercise, and appropriate vitamin d an calcium intake is necessary to maintain bone density. ...Read more

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Is walking good for bone density?

Is walking good for bone density?

Yes: Any weight bearing exercise has been shown to preserve bone density. Walking is good, but activities like water aerobics & swimming are non-weight bearing and will not help bone health. One of the problems astronauts face is bone density reduction because of prolonged weightlessness. Look for activities that get you up on your feet-golf, dancing, tennis are a few to keep your bones healthy. ...Read more

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Do analgesics affect bone density?

Do analgesics affect bone density?

Not really: Generally, there are three groups of analgesics: tylenol-like compounds, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents, and narcotic analgesic agents. The use of normally-recommended doses does not seem to affect the bone density or increase fracture risks. However, excessive use will affects both via multiple mechanisms. ...Read more

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How do you read a bone density x-ray?

How do you read a bone density x-ray?

Compare to others: Bone mineral density results are interpreted by comparing your density either to that of persons the same age, sex, and race as you (a z-score) or to persons of the same sex and race at peak bone density (young adult t-score). Adult definitions of osteopenia and osteoporosis are based on t-score results, with osteoporosis at a t-score of -2.5. For children z-scores are the only appropriate value. ...Read more

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When could I get a bone density test?

Depends who you ask: Recommendations say age 60 now but ages 50-60 are when the most bone is lost so it would be good to know where you stand about age 50. If you have been on oral steroids for a long time or if your vit d level is low then you might need a scan even earlier. I do not agree that age 60 is the ideal age for a density scan but many doctors start at that age. I think the cat is out of the bag by then. ...Read more

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Does a bone density test usually hurt?

No: The best bone density test, called dxa, does not use any needles. A person lies on a table and a very small dose of radiation passes through the lower spine and hip to measure bone density. It is painless. ...Read more

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Will chemotherapy affect bone density?

Will chemotherapy affect bone density?

Maybe: Anti-estrogen therapy for breast cancer, and androgen-deprivation therapy for prostate cancer can lead to decreases in bone density. Steroids, often used to treat cancers, or to control some side-effects of cancer, can also lead to decreased bone density. ...Read more

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Can you build bone density by swimming?

Can you build bone density by swimming?

Some not much : One of the biggest determinants of bone mineral density is lean body mass. Exercise is important for building lean body mass. Exercise is also important for putting load on your bones. This load is important for bone mass as bone strengthens as stresses are put upon it. Weight-bearing physical activity such as walking or running is better for building/ maintaining bone than non-weight-bearing activities such as swimming. ...Read more

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Women's loss of bone density inevitable?

Women's loss of bone density inevitable?

Can be slowed so not: It an be slowed so not a problem. The loss of trophic hormones for bone, hgh, estrogen, and also the usual decline in physical activity contribute to bone loss. The most important issue is a woman's peak bone mass between 20-25yrs. There will be a decline, but this can be slowed with calcium, vit d, and exercise. Hormones or other medications may be a good idea after menopause. ...Read more

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Is it normal to need a bone density scan?

Is it normal to need a bone density scan?

Yes, check: this link for the recommendations: http://www.webmd.com/osteoporosis/guide/who-needs-bone-density-testing

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How badly can coffee reduce bone density?

How badly can coffee reduce bone density?

Only in excess: Large amounts of coffee may cause a decrease in bone density. A large amount is considered 10 or more 8-ounce cups a day according to the national institutes of health. ...Read more

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Does weight training increase bone density?

Does weight training increase bone density?

Absolutely: Evidence shows that exercise help build and maintain bone density at any age. Studies have seen bone density increase by doing regular resistance exercises such as lifting weights for 20mi, 2-3 times a week. This type of weight-bearing exercise appears to stimulate bone formation via bone stimulation through muscle contraction. ...Read more

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Will my insurance cover a bone density test?

Will my insurance cover a bone density test?

Maybe: Depends on your insurance. For postmenopausal women a bone density test can be an important part of preventive care. If your insurance covers preventive care, such a test may be included. ...Read more

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Is low bone density indicative of osteoporosis?

Is low bone density indicative of osteoporosis?

Not by itself: A low bone density usually indicates osteoporosis but a small number of people may have osteomalacia, a condition in which there may be a normal amount of bone but it is poorly minerlized. Bllod tests can distinguish the two problems. ...Read more

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What does a "low normal" bone density test mean?

Very little!: When the world health organization arbitrarily set a level of bone mineral density (bmd) below which a person was said "to have" osteoporosis, the opportunity was immediately seized by interested parties to declare a range better than that density but adjacent to it as "osteopenia". Above that is called "normal" bmd is a continuum! normal is normal. Low normal means normal. ...Read more

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Is it true that tea is good for women's bone density?

Is it true that tea is good for women's bone density?

Yes: Tea is one of the most healthful beverages and has many benefits. Because green and black tea contain small amounts of fluoride, it increases bone density. Women who drink tea have more bone and fewer fractures than women who do not drink tea. Most herbal teas do not contain fluoride. ...Read more

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How can I increase bone density? Consume more calcium?

How can I increase bone density? Consume more calcium?

Calcium, Vit D: In your age group, the best things to do for bone density is to avoid excessive weight loss, do regular exercise, consume at least 1000 mg of calcium daily (preferably in foods rather than supplements), take about 2000 iu of vit d daily, don't smoke, avoid medications that can lower bone density (steroids, proton pump inhibitors). Also, be aware that dexa scans in your age group may be inaccurate. ...Read more

Dr. Robert Lang
1,159 doctors shared insights

Bone Density (Definition)

Bone density (or bone mineral density) is a medical term normally referring to the amount of mineral matter per square centimeter of bones. Bone density (or bmd) is used in clinical medicine as an indirect indicator of ...Read more