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Doctor insights on: Seizure Of The Autonomic Nervous System

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Dr. Jeffrey Bassman
7 doctors shared insights

Autonomic Nervous System (Definition)

The autonomic nervous system is part of the peripheral nervous system. It is ‘autonomic’ because it does not require voluntary thought to function. The autonomic nervous system is divided into the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems. The sympathetic system manages “fight or flight” responses and the parasympathetic system acts as a counterpart that manages ...Read more


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What reflex is independent of the central nervous system (CNS)?

What reflex is independent of the central nervous system (CNS)?

More than I can list: With which organ system outside the BRAIN & SPINAL cord do you wish to start? What's the clinical context of the question so I can better understand the purpose of the question. This forum is basically for questions of a general clinical nature and what you ask seems to be for more academic purposes. ...Read more

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Can you compare the somatic nervous system with the autonomic nervous system?

Can you compare the somatic nervous system with the autonomic nervous system?

Nervous system: somatic nervous system is under your control, example making given him smoking up and down. Autonomic nervous system not to not under voluntary control, example your heart rate and blood pressure are dramatically controlled depending on the needs of the body, your interest and will move by peristalsis, movement of the bowels ...Read more

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Describe the features of an autonomic nervous system disorder.?

Describe the features of an autonomic nervous system disorder.?

A broad topic: The autonomic nervous system controlls body functions that occur automatically. This includes heart rate, breathing, blood pressure and sweating among others. Autonomic disorder can be many and varied. An example would be failure of the blood pressure to increase when stading from a lying position causing dizziness or fainting. Another may be a fast resting heart rate. Talk to your doctor for more. ...Read more

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What are the difference between central nervous system and autonomic nervous system?

What are the difference between central nervous system and autonomic nervous system?

What they control: The central nervous system refers to the brain and the spinal cord. The autonomic nervous system is a part of the peripheral nervous system that is involved in processes related to heart rate, sweating, blood pressure, and other processes that we don't think about, aka the name "autonomic". Autonomic nervous system disorders include fainting, fast heart rate, fatigue and sweating disorders. ...Read more

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Would activation of the sympathetic or parasympathetic nervous system lead to hunger?

Would activation of the sympathetic or parasympathetic nervous system lead to hunger?

A PairofSympathetics: The answer could be made VERY complicated but, just to sort-of give an overall picture: if you are jagged-up by the sympathetic system, you won't have much of an appetite unless you're a shark on the make (well, a shark is a Chondrichthyte so technically doesn't have a sympathetic nervous system....whatever...), but if you are calmed down parasympathetically your juices will flow, ready to eat. ...Read more

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What is the autonomic vs central nervous system?

What is the autonomic vs central nervous system?

Unvoluntary: The autonomic is visceral, not on command, like control of heart, respiration, digestive, urinary systems, sexual arousal, etc central is brain and spinal cord--then there is peripheral like nerves control movements of the limbs. ...Read more

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What causes disorder of the central nervous system?

What causes disorder of the central nervous system?

See below: Might produce a better answer if you can describe the kind of disorder you have in mind. Generally, the central nervous system consists of the brain and the spinal cord. So all factors that can damage them or lead to defects in them can cause disorders. ...Read more

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What is the role of parasympathetic nervous system?

ConstrucT : Anabolism and catabolism both continue emergency arise so sympathetic or flight fight comes in action emergency over reconstruction begins parasympathetic takes over again which is our base line. ...Read more

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What is the autonomic nervous system (ans)?

What is the autonomic nervous system (ans)?

Autonomic nervous: System is the part of the peripheral nervous system that controls the "automatic" body functions -- heart rate, respiration, digestion, perspiration, hormone secretion, etc, versus the motor nervous system that controls voluntary movement. Biofeedback research has proven that even many ANS functions can be consciously affected or trained -- www.Bcia.Org or www.Aapb.Org. ...Read more

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Which part of the nervous system is control by 75% of the vagus nerve?

Which part of the nervous system is control by 75% of the vagus nerve?

Please clarify: Frankly, I have no idea what your post means. The vagus nerve is PART of the nervous system. It's part of the parasympathetic nervous system. Maybe if you posted what led you to ask the question I could figure out what you mean because right now I haven't got a clue. It's like asking, "Which part of the car is control by 75% of the windshield?" ...Read more

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What causes major inhibitory effects in the central nervous system?

What causes major inhibitory effects in the central nervous system?

Neurotransmitters: A balance of excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters exist to facilitate normal bodily functions. The inhibitors are many, including acetylcholine, norepinephrine, seratonin, dopamine, and these modulate the effects of the excitatory chemicals. ...Read more

Dr. Alan Ali Dr. Ali
2 doctors agreed:
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Can you describe the dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system?

Dr. Alan Ali Dr. Ali
2 doctors agreed:
Can you describe the dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system?

Autonomic nervous sy: Dysfunction affects the motor innervation of smooth muscles, heart muscle & gland cells. It can affect the sympathetic or the parasympathetic components, or both. ...Read more

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Does m.S. Only attack the central nervous system?

Does m.S. Only attack the central nervous system?

Yes: Multiple sclerosis (ms) is an autoimmune disease (body's defense system attacking itself) that involves the central nervous system. Central nervous is composed of the brain and spinal cord. Myelin sheaths protect and insulate nerve cells; in ms the myelin sheaths on the axons (longer parts of the nerve cells) are inflamed and damaged, leading to scar development seen in white matter of the brain. ...Read more

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What is the life span after diagnosis of central nervous system CNS vasculitis?

What is the life span after diagnosis of central nervous system CNS vasculitis?

Highly variable: Depends on root cause and treatment response. Sometimes it will relapse and remit, other times it can spontaneously resolve. ...Read more

Dr. Alan Ali Dr. Ali
3 doctors agreed:
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What causes dysautonomia (dysfunction of autonomic nervous system)?

Dr. Alan Ali Dr. Ali
3 doctors agreed:
What causes dysautonomia (dysfunction of autonomic nervous system)?

Dysautonomia: Several, such as diabetes, autoimmune disorders, connective tissue diseases, parkinson's disease, lyme disease, hereditary, injury to brain or spinal cord. ...Read more

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Dr. Ronald Krauser
7 doctors shared insights

Autonomic (Definition)

The autonomic nervous system (ans or visceral nervous system or involuntary nervous system) is the part of the peripheral nervous system that acts as a control system functioning largely below the level of consciousness, and controls visceral functions, such as heart rate, digestion, respiratory rate, salivation, perspiration, pupillary dilation, ...Read more


Dr. Bennett Machanic
1,203 doctors shared insights

Seizures (Uncontrollable Jerking Of Limbs) (Definition)

A seizure is a symptom in which a person has a convulsion or epileptic attack, usually involving jerking movements of the head, limbs, and rest of the body. It represents abnormal brain function, and can be caused by fever (mainly in young children), by brain infections or tumors, by drug abuse or overdoses, by chemical imbalances, sleep deprivation, etc. ...Read more