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Doctor insights on: Scleroderma

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Dr. Pierre Moeser
184 Doctors shared insights

Scleroderma (Overview)

An autoimmune disease in which there is excessive thickening of the connective tissues. This can cause skin tightening, rash, difficulty swallowing, and in severe cases affect kidneys and other organs.


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If it is scleroderma, is it a lifelong dilemma?

If it is scleroderma, is it a lifelong dilemma?

Usually: As no effective treatments exist, this disease is often chronic and progressive. In rare instances, remissions have occurred. ...Read more

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Dr. Pierre Moeser
184 Doctors shared insights

Scleroderma (Overview)

An autoimmune disease in which there is excessive thickening of the connective tissues. This can cause skin tightening, rash, difficulty swallowing, and in severe cases affect kidneys and other organs.


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How does scleroderma progress over time?

How does scleroderma progress over time?

Depends on type: Some forms of localized scleroderma which affect only the skin do not progress and can even improve. Other forms such as progressive systemic sclerosis can (slowly or quickly) progress to involve the blood vessels and internal organs. It is important to be diagnosed early to anticipate and treat any progressive involvement, especially involvement of the kidneys. ...Read more

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What are common symptoms of scleroderma?

What are common symptoms of scleroderma?

Skin changes: The first sign is usually patchy areas on the skin that often make a linear pattern. Early on, they are slightly pink and thickened, but can be flat and shiny. As time passes, the skin spots enlarge and often become thick and lavender/purple-colored, sometimes with pale flat centers. Scleroderma can also affect the heart, lung, kidney, joints, digestive tract. Please see your doctor if you're worried. ...Read more

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What are signs, symptoms of scleroderma?

What are signs, symptoms of scleroderma?

Tight skin: People with scleroderma have tight skin, but have other findings including raynauds, finger changing color in the cold or stress, joint pain, and can have internal involvement in the lungs, heart, kidney etc. Each person has different finding and the rheumatologist helps to put it together. ...Read more

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Positive diagnosis (scleroderma, polymyositis) with negative blood tests? Is that common?

Positive diagnosis (scleroderma, polymyositis) with negative blood tests? Is that common?

PM/Scl: The paradox of rheumatologic diseases is that there are more lab tests in this area than any other, and they of relatively less value compared to the history and physical findings than in other fields. If your rheumatologist is comfortable with the diagnosis of "scleromyositis", which usually features anti-pm/scl, i'd accept it even with a single negative result, and proceed. ...Read more

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Is a ANA + with mixed patterns 1:80 homogeneous n 1:160 centromere sufficient enough to diagnose 4 crest/scleroderma or additional tests needed?

Is a ANA + with mixed patterns 1:80 homogeneous n 1:160 centromere sufficient enough to diagnose 4 crest/scleroderma or additional tests needed?

Auto Immune disease: You need additional testing to diagonals crest/scleroderma. You should also see the rheumatologist to confirm the disease before you
worry that you have scleroderma or not. ...Read more

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I test positive for scleroderma. I have reflux asthma and reynaldo's. Does this mean I have scleroderma?

See below: This is a determination best made by your rheumatologist who knows your history best. Reflux can be seen in scleroderma and reflux can cause asthma symptoms regardless of whether you have scleroderma or not. Raynaud's is associated with scleroderma, but it can also be seen in other conditions independent of scleroderma. ...Read more

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What are the tests for scleroderma?

Scleroderma tests: The diagnosis of scleroderma is based mostly on signs and symptoms. Lab tests may help confirm the diagnosis and even
offer some predictions as to risks of certain types of complications. Anti rna-polymerase iii antibody, increases
risk of renal crisis and sudden increase in blood pressure, antitopoisomerase ab, increases risk for scaring of the lung, anticentromere ab, pulmonary hypertension. ...Read more

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Anyone know anything about scleroderma?

Anyone know anything about scleroderma?

Autoimmune disease: Scleroderma literally means, "hard skin" which is a prominent feature. It is an autoimmune disease that results from cells making excess collagen which hardens and tightens the skin and blood vessels and sometimes internal organs. The severity can vary greatly from person to person. Fortunately, it is a rare disease. A rheumatologist is the best doctor to evaluate and treat this disease. ...Read more

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What causes scleroderma in people?

What causes scleroderma in people?

I hate: As a surgeon to get involved but I lost my wife in just two years... It is an autoimmune disease of unknown origin. When just suspected a sedimentation rate, ANA levels, anti scl-70 and anti-centromere antibodies should be stat done. A good resource is this web site: http://www. Synnovation. Com/sclerodermafaq. Html I would seek help from a university based rheumatology department... ...Read more

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Ana was nucleolar ENA negative c3c and 4 low no symptoms does nucleolar always mean scleroderma I have no symptoms?

Ana was nucleolar ENA negative c3c and 4 low no symptoms does nucleolar always mean scleroderma I have no symptoms?

No! Many false pos.!: I believe you have little to worry about. I see many false positives in my rheumatology practice. No one knows how many there are, but false positive anas are great for my practice! I can give the patient goodnews! 5% of the population has false positive anas. ...Read more

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What can I do to treat scleroderma?

What can I do to treat scleroderma?

Depends on type: The treatment ranges from "no treatment necessary" for mild forms of localized scleroderma (limited to the skin) to bone marrow transplantation for systemic sclerosis with internal organ involvement. Though there is no cure, advances are being made in the treatment of all manifestations of the condition. ...Read more

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How will my scleroderma be treated?

How will my scleroderma be treated?

Please see below: Scleroderma has no cure. But symptoms and damage can be reduced with treatment. ...Read more

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What's a simple, cheap treatment for my scleroderma?

Don't Be Foolish: Scleroderma is a serious condition. There is nothing cheap about it. And more importantly your good health is most important. Ask your rheumatologist if they have "generic" meds that are less expensive. But don't go cheap when it comes to such a serious disease. ...Read more

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I try to avoid toxic drugs and treatments. What can I try before I go for traditional medical care for circumscribed scleroderma?

NOT AS SEVERE: Scleroderma is a fascinating disease and has 3 main types, diffuse, limited and localized also known as morphea. Diffuse scleroderma is the most severe. Circumscribed scleroderma or morphea tends to mean a localized area of thickened skin. This tends to be less severe with few compications of other organs which is typical of diffuse scleroderma. Treament is limited. ...Read more

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How do you treat scleroderma? Is it ever cured? Does it spread?

It can improve: There is no cure for scleroderma, but there are many things that can be done to treat it depending on the involvement. Blood pressure control, kidney protection, temperature protection for the extremes of cold and heat. Scleroderma people in the past would not survive renal failure - but with blood pressure control, dialysis these patients can not survive with return to renal function. ...Read more

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Who gets scleroderma?

Anyone, even children: Anyone can get scleroderma, even children. Women have a higher incidence than men. There are different forms of scleroderma and those subtypes vary slightly in their incidences among people of european versus african descent. ...Read more

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Is scleroderma genetic?

Is scleroderma genetic?

Yes: In certain groups such as the choctaw population in oklahoma there is a strong genetic component. There is also a difference in populations between the different continents. ...Read more

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Dr. Bernard Seif
142 Doctors shared insights

Dermatosclerosis (Definition)

Dermatosclerosis = scleroderma = autoimmune disease affecting connective tissue & blood vessels. It causes skin to thicken asymmetrically due to deposits of fibrous connective ...Read more


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