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Doctor insights on: Retroperitoneal Lymphoma

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How often does a "retroperitoneal attenuation" (found on CT urogram) turn out to be lymphoma? My dad is being tested for this. PET scan next. Worried.

How often does a "retroperitoneal attenuation" (found on CT urogram) turn out to be lymphoma? My dad is being tested for this. PET scan next. Worried.

Not often: Retro peritoneal attenuation is and unusual term on ct. CT is usually very good at detecting enlarged lymph nodes of lymphoma . And understand that not all lymphomas will be best seen with PET. Also not every positive PET CT is cancer. There are other disease entities that are positve on PET. Talk honestly with the doctor to wxplain the results ...Read more

Dr. Michael Thompson
1,723 doctors shared insights

Lymphoma (Definition)

Lymphoma is cancer of the lymph system, which is an infection fighting collection of nodes of lymph tissue populated by white blood cells and ducts that drain excess fluid. The system ...Read more


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Can lymphoma be cured?

Can lymphoma be cured?

Lymphoma: There are many types of lymphoma-from the agressive ones to the indolent ones. Each type has different biology and different response to therapy, as well as different prognosis etc. However, in general, lymphoma is a chemosensitive disease and is a radiosensitive disease. Yes, some lymphoma can be cured. ...Read more

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What is d cell lymphoma?

What is d cell lymphoma?

T cell lymphoma?: I think you mean t cell lymphoma, a cancer of t cells or thymocytes that can cause lymph gland enlargement, low blood counts, fevers, and sweats. A particular subtype is gamma-delta (the greek letter for d) hepatosplenic lymphoma, which could also be what you're referring to. A good source of information is the leukemia & lymphoma society of america's website. ...Read more

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How is lymphoma detected?

How is lymphoma detected?

Symptoms and imaging: People usually present with symptoms -- eg, fever, chills, night sweats, fatigue, lymph node enlargement, spleen enlargement, etc. Then (or sometimes incidentally) abnormal lymph nodes are noted on ct scans. A biopsy (of lymph nodes and/or bone marrow) is needed for diagnosis. Less often blood abnormalities show a leukemic (blood) component of lymphoma or other abnormalities. ...Read more

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Can you die from lymphoma?

Yes: This day and age unlikely. Significant numbers of patients can be cured with early detection and treatment. ...Read more

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How rare is burkitt's lymphoma?

Uncommon: Burkitt's lymphoma comprises about a third of childhood lymphomas, but less than 1% of adult lymphomas in europe and the usa. This very aggressive malignancy is much more common in africa, however. ...Read more

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How to know if I have lymphoma?

How to know if I have lymphoma?

See below...: The diagnosis and treatment of lymphoma, like any other cancer, should be managed by an oncologist. Many signs and symptoms are possible at presentation including unexplained weight loss, lymph node enlargement, lack of appetite, night sweats, fatigue, prolonged fever, enlarged spleen and/or liver, etc. ...Read more

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What are symptoms for lymphoma?

Lumps: Very often a person will notice a painless lump which is an enlarged lymph node. More advanced cases may present with fatigue, unexplained weight loss, unexplained night sweats or night fevers, even diffuse itching. ...Read more

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What are some signs of lymphoma?

What are some signs of lymphoma?

Lymphoma...: Often, the first sign of lymphoma is a painless swelling in the neck, under an arm, or in the groin. Lymph nodes or tissues elsewhere in the body may also swell. The spleen, for example, often becomes enlarged in lymphoma. Symptoms of lymphoma may include the following: fevers, chills, unexplained weight loss, night sweats, fatigue, and itching. ...Read more

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How likely is surviving lymphoma?

Many variables: Survival and treatment selection depend on many variables: stage of disease, type of lymphoma, age of patient, associated symptoms, overall performance status, specific pathologic and blood based risk factors, as well as response to therapy. It is too broad to cover all aspects specifically so i would refer you to online resources such as acs.Org or institutional web resources like mdacc or mskcc. ...Read more