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Doctor insights on: Renal Failure Hypernatremia Hyperkalemia

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Would renal failure result in hypo- or hyperkalemia? Why?

Would renal failure result in hypo- or hyperkalemia? Why?

Depends: Many factors contribute to serum potassium levels including residual kidney function, diuretic use, potassium intake, GI potassium loss (i.e. diarrhea), and acid/base status. It is possible to see high or low serum potassium levels in patients with renal failure but hyperkalemia (high potassium) is more commonly observed in patients with advanced renal dysfunction. ...Read more

Dr. Barbara Lavi
1 Doctor shared a insight

Hyperkalemia (Definition)

Hyperkalemia in an elevated potassium level in the blood. It can be mild to severe. The most common causes are kidney disease, Addison's disease, dehydration, and multiple drug therapies. It can occur in crush injuries and rhabdomyolysis (rapid breakdown of muscle) or hemolysis (breakdown of blood cells). Severe hyperkalemia can be fatal and cause the heart to stop beating or become very slow. It is usually treated by resin exchange agents (Kayexalate or others) or dialysis and fluids. Sometimes glucose, Insulin and sodium bicarbonate can be utilized as ...Read more


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If someone has renal failure, how can they be treated for hypernatremia?

If someone has renal failure, how can they be treated for hypernatremia?

Hypernatremia: Reduce salt intake and balance that against increasing water intake. The caveat here is where is the patient in the continuum from end-stage renal disease being managed medically to being on dialysis? Each scenario has different answers to reducing sodium in the blood. Also important to know is what caused the kidney failure in the first place because treatment has to be tailored to the disease. ...Read more

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Can a person have both hypernatremia and hyperkalemia?

Possibly yes: Dehydration is the most common cause for both. Also certain medication may play this role. Your physician would have to look the whole picture on why this person developed both. ...Read more

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Is it possible for hyperkalemia and hypernatremia occur at the same time?

Possibly yes: Dehydration is the most common cause for both. Also certain medication may play this role. Your physician would have to look the whole picture on why this person developed both. ...Read more

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Can hyperkalemia and hypernatremia occur at the same time from IV fluid?

Possibly: Electrolyte abnormalities are common in hospitalized patients and can result from multiple factors. They often result from a patient's underlying condition. Intravenous fluid composition could also play a role. You should discuss with your doctor for specific answers in a specific situation. ...Read more

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If a patient has hypernatremia, renal and hepatic dysfunction then is it useful to add potassium chloride to the person's normal saline IV?

If a patient has hypernatremia, renal and hepatic dysfunction then is it useful to add potassium chloride to the person's normal saline IV?

Maybe.: Tough question in a 91 year old. There may be a reason for this but I suspect it is more related to the levels of potassium and or the acid base balance or medications or other therapies rather than to the sodium level. ...Read more

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Help plz! Can renal failure be cured entirely?

Renal failure treatm: Renal failure is irreversible, can be controlled unlikely to be cured, options would be renal dialysis, in end stage failure transplant, requiring anti rejection meds, even trap landed kidneys can fail ...Read more

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What food can be taken by renal failure patients?

What food can be taken by renal failure patients?

Many: These patients can still eat any foods, but they just need to decrease the amount of potassium and phosphorous containing foods. Just as a diabetic can eat any sweets, they need to limit it. Renal failure patients need to limit total fluids, potassium and phosphorous. If on dialysis, protein is usually encouraged, but if pre-dialysis, high protein intake may not be a good idea. ...Read more

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What is the life expectancy of a person in renal failure?

What is the life expectancy of a person in renal failure?

Weeks: Once kidney function falls below 10% of normal, most patients will develop uremia. This includes progressive weakness and confusion progressing to coma and death, unless some form of kidney replacement therapy is instituted. ...Read more

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Plz tel why renal failure patients should consume low salts?

Plz tel why renal failure patients should consume low salts?

The kidneys are sick: When you are young and healthy and the kidneys function normally, they can eliminate salt you take in more efficiently. When the kidneys are sick, they lose the ability to get rid of the extra salt, thus body will accumulate excess salt = bad--cause fluid retention, hypertension, heart failure etc. As a result, many things should be restricted in renal failure patient. Consult doc. Good luck. ...Read more

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What is acute renal failure?

What is acute renal failure?

Acute renal failure: This is when your kidneys abruptly stop working or greatly slow down in their ability to clean the blood of things that you body does not need. Many substances normally removed by the kidney are potentially harmful if they build up in your blood. Examples of this are too much acid, potentially harmful byproducts of drugs you are taking, and the end products of protein metabolism. ...Read more

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What is chronic renal failure?

What is chronic renal failure?

Lab testing: A creatinine clearance number of less the 10 generally determines renal failure. This number is calculated by your age, weight and sex. Not all people with CKD need dialysis right away. This is determined by symptoms associated with renal failuire like high potassium, volume overload (edema and difficulty breathing), itching, poor appetite, other "uremic" symptoms. ...Read more

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How do you test for renal failure?

How do you test for renal failure?

Blood chemistry: High level of BUN and creatinine with low level of bicarbonate (sodium bicarbonate) strongly suggest poor renal function. ...Read more

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How can nsaids cause renal failure?

How can nsaids cause renal failure?

Prostaglandins: Nsaids inhibit prostaglandins, the bad ones that cause inflammation but also the good ones that help make your stomach coating and help maintain good blood flow in the kidneys. Over time, chronic NSAID use can cause kidney failure. ...Read more

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How does tenofovir cause renal failure?

How does tenofovir cause renal failure?

Accumulation: Tenofovir, or viread, (tenofovir) is a powerful antiviral medication for hiv. It has, in rare cases, been thought to contribute to renal failure. The thought is that the drug and metabolites of the drug accumulate in the tubule of the kidneys, causing damage to the filtering system. However, some studies have shown that tenovir is no more toxic than other antivirals. ...Read more

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Does acute renal failure reverse itself?

With treatment: Generally yes, but intervention must occur as early as possible. It does depend on the severity. ...Read more

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How can you treat renal failure in a preemie?

Really hard to do: This requires the expertise and skills of a pediatric kidney doctor. Diet modification, dialysis, avoiding complications, and treating the underlying cause can be effective in my experience. ...Read more

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What are some symptoms of acute renal failure?

Low urine output: Some common symptoms and signs of acute renal failure are low urine output (oliguria), edema, and high blood pressure. ...Read more

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Why can hypovolemic shock lead to renal failure?

Why can hypovolemic shock lead to renal failure?

Shock: Hypovelemic shock can cause renal failure from either the body conserving free water due to severe dehydration and producing a low volume of highly concentrated urine or from a lack of blood flow and oxygen to the kidneys producing intrinsic kidney injury and renal failure. ...Read more

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What causes renal failure at 60 in obese person?

What causes renal failure at 60 in obese person?

Renal Failure: There are many causes of renal disease in people. High blood pressure and diabetes are the most common causes although obesity can be linked to focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Medications can also cause renal failure (nsaids like ibuprofen/advil and several other meds). It is best evaluated by a nephrologist. ...Read more

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Is celebrex (celecoxib) renal failure reversable?

Is celebrex (celecoxib) renal failure reversable?

Not usually: Celebrex (celecoxib) and the other meds in the group "nsaids" typically cause damage to the kidney from longer term use. Often the injury is added to underlying kidney function that is already abnormal. At this point, it is important to avoid the use of any other nsaids such as advil or Motrin - or the typical drug name ibuprofen. ...Read more

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What are the complications of acute renal failure?

What are the complications of acute renal failure?

Several: High potassium, fluid overload, metabolic acidosis, these problems can lead to heart failure, cardiac rythym disturbances and even death. ...Read more

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Why is urine osmolality low in post renal failure?

Need time to heal: Acute kidney failure involves damage to the cells lining the kidney tubules (nephrons) which take days to regrow and repair. These cells then reestablish the high osmotic gradient in the kidney pyramids that enable concentration of urine. Until the cells regrow and the osmotic gradient is reformed, urine osmolality will be low. ...Read more

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Can renal failure cause increase in uric acid level?

Yes it can: Yes it can. As the kidney weakens, uric acid levels can increase and lead to gout attacks. ...Read more

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What diet is recommended with chronic renal failure?

What diet is recommended with chronic renal failure?

Renal diet: Typical dietary advice would include low sodium, low phosphate and high protein if on dialysis. Pre dialysis advice may ask for low protein to extend pre dialysis renal function. Every patient has differing needs. The diet should be discussed with your doctor. ...Read more

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What does renal osteodystrophy in renal failure mean?

Bone disease: People with renal failure develop weaken bones from abnormal mineralization of the bone. Renal osteodystrophy is the name of this process where calcium and phosphorus do not deposit into the bone correctly and therefore the person's bones are prone to fractures. ...Read more

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Can adding baking soda to renal failure patients help?

Yes: Correcting acidosis with sodium bicarbonate has been shown to slow down the progression of chronic kidney disease. Please consult your kidney doctor regarding the appropriate dosage. ...Read more

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What are some of the symptoms of chronic renal failure?

Uremic symptoms: As kidney function deteriorates, one will start to develop symptoms of uremia (i.e. build-up of toxins the kidneys are unable to excrete) including persistent nausea, vomiting, poor appetite, diffuse itching, depression, and inability to concentrate. As chronic kidney disease progresses, anemia will get worse and feel tired (kidneys produce a hormone that stimulates bone marrow to produce RBCs) ...Read more

Dr. Tarek Naguib
600 Doctors shared insights

Kidney Failure (Definition)

A condition in which your kidneys suddenly stop working normally. Since your kidneys remove waste products and help balance water and salt and other minerals (electrolytes) in your blood, when your kidneys stop working, waste products, fluids, and electrolytes build up in your body. This can cause problems ...Read more


Hypernatremia (Definition)

A high concentration of ...Read more