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Doctor insights on: Proximal Renal Tubular Acidosis

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Can haemodialysis correct metabolic acidosis in renal failure patient?

Can haemodialysis correct metabolic acidosis in renal failure patient?

Renal Replacement Th: Dialysis is one of the treatments for metabolic acidosis. Depending on the cause as well as the other medical problems and type of the acidosis, correcting the inciting problem is the first step dialysis may or may not be needed. ...Read more

Acidosis (Definition)

Normally our body chemistry is kept in a narrow range, and in particular the amount of acid in the body is kept within a narrow range. The amount of acid is measured by a value called the ph. It is normally a value between 7.35 and 7.45, values below 7.35 are considered to be "acidotic" a patient with this value of the blood chemistry ...Read more


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What does renal osteodystrophy in renal failure mean?

What does renal osteodystrophy in renal failure mean?

Bone disease: People with renal failure develop weaken bones from abnormal mineralization of the bone. Renal osteodystrophy is the name of this process where calcium and phosphorus do not deposit into the bone correctly and therefore the person's bones are prone to fractures. ...Read more

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What is metabolic acidosis in chronic renal failure from?

What is metabolic acidosis in chronic renal failure from?

Unable to remove: Metabolic acidosis is a constituent of renal failure, arising mainly from the inability of kidney to remove excess acids in blood. ...Read more

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Hi, is the metabolic acidosis in chronic renal failure fatal ?

Hi, is the metabolic acidosis in chronic renal failure fatal ?

Acidosis: The simple answer is yes. However, the amount of acid has to be very high for that to happen. High amounts of acid in the blood interfere with many, if not all, biologic processes in the human body such as the effect of Insulin lowering blood sugar, the normal metabolism of proteins and fats that are essential for life, and even normal heart beat, just to name a few. ...Read more

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What's tubular nephrosis?

What's tubular nephrosis?

Tubular neCrosis?: "nephrosis" is an old name for any kidney disease, but the usual term is tubular necrosis, the anatomic lesion in common temporary kidney failure in which the tubule cells die. They grow back amazingly well most of the time. ...Read more

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Does renal cell carcinoma lead to chronic renal failure?

Does renal cell carcinoma lead to chronic renal failure?

Not necessarily: Only if both the kidneys have to be removed if cancer on both sides. If only one kidney or a part of kidney only is removed and the remaining kidney is healthy dialysis is not required. ...Read more

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Can you have renal tubular acidosis with an elevated serum anion gap?

Can you have renal tubular acidosis with an elevated serum anion gap?

Yes: RTA doesn't cause elevated anion gap, but other disorders that do can be present along with RTA. For example, advanced kidney failure can cause anion gap, and also cause RTA. Usually simple math will show that the anion gap doesn't completely account for the degree of acidosis, and urine tests can demonstrate presence of RTA. ...Read more

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Can renal stone effect GFR ?

Yes...: Not directly. The process of stone formation involves some chemical transportation across the membranes and tubules.......this eventually decreases GFR. ...Read more

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What does renal punctate calyceal calculi mean?

What does renal punctate calyceal calculi mean?

Tiny kidney stones: Or nephrocalcinosis. Stones are either attatched to wall of kidney calices (major urinary drainage ducts), junction of the urniary clooecting ducts ; calices or possibly at ends of tiny collecting ducts draining into the calices. Could signify metabolic kidney stone disease. ...Read more

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Renal failure common with diabetes?

Renal failure common with diabetes?

Yes: Diabetes is the most common cause of permanent kidney failure in most of the world. 40-50% of patients with diabetes will be affected by this complication. Diabetes also increases the risk of acute kidney injury, particularly following x-rays using intravenous contrast. ...Read more

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Would renal failure result in hypo- or hyperkalemia? Why?

Would renal failure result in hypo- or hyperkalemia? Why?

Depends: Many factors contribute to serum potassium levels including residual kidney function, diuretic use, potassium intake, GI potassium loss (i.e. diarrhea), and acid/base status. It is possible to see high or low serum potassium levels in patients with renal failure but hyperkalemia (high potassium) is more commonly observed in patients with advanced renal dysfunction. ...Read more

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Multiply 3 mm renal calculi? Does this mean kidney stones?

Multiply 3 mm renal calculi? Does this mean kidney stones?

3 mm calculi: Yes, calculus is one stone; calculi are multiple stones; they are small if all are 3 mm or less; multiple 3 mm stones requires determination of cause; if not done, you require 24 hour urine testing for chemical analysis; and blood testing. Meanwhile, increase fluids to 3-4 Liters daily; add 4-5 tablespns ReaLemon Extract daily; follow low salt, low protein diet; reduce oxalate foods also; ...Read more

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What is the difference between acute renal failure and acute tubular necrosis?

What is the difference between acute renal failure and acute tubular necrosis?

Here are some...: Acute renal failure is a general term denoting kidneys not able to good enough to manage water and electrolytes due to acute conditions such as shocks from various reasons, and acute tubular necrosis denotes what can be seen in kidney tissue under microscopic exam if biopsy is done, but not necessary for almost all cases. Clinically, they all tell us kidneys not working enough from acute causes. ...Read more

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Can a renal ultrasound diagnose renal parenchymal disease?

Can a renal ultrasound diagnose renal parenchymal disease?

Not typically: An ultrasound can suggest radiographic evidence of medical renal disease but cannot diagnose this. To make the diagnosis of renal parenchymal disease the radiographic findings must be combined with blood studies of kidney function and sometimes urine studies for protein or a kidney biopsy. ...Read more

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Is Kidney shrinkage kidney failure?

Is Kidney shrinkage kidney failure?

Not necessarily: The shrinking of the kidney can lead to decreased kidney function (kidney failure) but there are two kidneys and if one decreased function the other kidney will step up to the task. It needs to be clear why one kidney shrank. This is a guide to the diagnosis and the therapy. Some illness actually cause both kidney to shrink. Your function will help clarify your diagnosis. ...Read more

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Why are proximal tubular cells not affected in chronic renal failure and thereby not causing glucosuria?

Why are proximal tubular cells not affected in chronic renal failure and thereby not causing glucosuria?

Good question: Chronic renal disease is most often caused by damage to the blood vessels or the glomeruli / filters, leaving the proximal tubular cells able to work on however much filtrate is present. ...Read more

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Leftkidney measures11.3x5.5cms enlarged in size rightkidney 9x5.5cms perapelvic cyst leftkidney causing mild calyectasis.Multiple renal cortical cys?

Leftkidney measures11.3x5.5cms enlarged in size rightkidney 9x5.5cms 
perapelvic cyst leftkidney causing mild calyectasis.Multiple renal cortical cys?

Multiple kidney cyst: The vast majority of renal cysts and benign simple cysts which are a symptomatic and causes no problems. It is not the same as polycystic kidney disease, where many cysts on both kidneys could lead to kidney failure. An ultrasound can determine if these are simple vs complex cysts, the latter could be worrisome. I suspect the kind you have could simply be followed over time; urologist will guide. ...Read more

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What is the difference between acute renal failure and end-stage renal failure?

Renal failure: Acute renal failure: seen in a healthy person who develops an illness (e.g. hemolytic uremic syndrome [in children] or septic shock and multiple organ dysfunction) that leads to renal failure. Often it resolves. End-stage renal disease implies that the problem has been there for weeks/months, is not going to resolve and the person may need kidney transplant ...Read more

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What is the difference between acute renal failure and acute renal insufficiency?

Acute renal failure: Failure means kidneys stopped completely. Insufficiency not completely gone but not normal. ...Read more