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Doctor insights on: Posterior Tibialis Tendonitis Treatment

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What is posterior tibialis tendonitis?

What is posterior tibialis tendonitis?

Treatment options: My suggestions to patients w/ tendonitis consist of rice, anti-inflammatories (oral/ topical), strengthening/ stretching. I also may suggest massage or bracing. If the above list does not help then you may want to consider discussing injections (cortisone or prp), oral/ topical prescriptions, or even orthotics with your physician. ...Read more

Dr. Jimmy Bowen
825 doctors shared insights

Tendinitis (Definition)

The inflammation of a tendon, ...Read more


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Is posterior tibial tendonitis the same as posterior tibial tendon dysfunction?

Very close.: Tendonits is a bit more acute and sharply painful. Dysfunction (pttd) refers more to the overuse/overstrecthing of the tendon for mechanical reasons. A person with pttd can also have tendonitis, whereas a patient with tenodonitis may or may not have pttd. ...Read more

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Lateral epicondylitis, tendinopathy with multiple tendon ruptures along extensor tendon. Treatment options?

Lateral epicondylitis, tendinopathy with multiple tendon ruptures along extensor tendon. Treatment options?

That is a very com--: Plex problem that you have. Is it in the same arm or elbow area? Is this from an injury? Without being seen ; examined/investigated, its difficult to address all your issues in a meaningful way. You need to see an orthopod or a elbow/shoulder surgeon to get the best advice, as otherwise you'll get a pot pouri of suggestions, which may or may not help. Good luck. ...Read more

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Is posterior tibial tendonitis the same thing as posterior tibial tendon dysfunction?

It can be: As the itis can be the dysfunction. But posterior tendon dysfunction can be more than just inflammation. It could mean anything that causes the tendon to not function optimally. ...Read more

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How does an anterior ankle sprain cause post tibial tendinitis?

How does an anterior ankle sprain cause post tibial tendinitis?

PTT kinesiology:: Posterior tibial tendinitis could result from an anterior ankle injury when there is excessive demand placed on the tibialis posterior muscle due to anterior ankle laxity. When one part of a joint becomes weak another part becomes overworked to compensate. This is one reason that ankle injuries need thorough evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment by a qualified doctor. ...Read more

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What is the treatment for posterior tibial tendon dysfunction?

Protecting the foot: Treatment depends on the severity of the dysfunction. The pt muscle is the main strap muscle that holds up the arch and tries to control over pronation of the foot. If this is severely damaged, the arch can collapse and lead the serious foot deformities and discomfort. The goal of treatment is to protect the arch from damage. See your foot specialist. Dr l. ...Read more

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Tibiallis posterior sever infection treatment !

Tibiallis posterior  sever infection treatment !

Tough question: I never heard of a posterior tibiallis infection but like anything else if it is severely infected it would need to be treated with antibiotices and possible surgery as well to open the muscle. go to a ...Read more

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Ankle MRI report - ant tib tendon bowing, tendonitis in ant tib, tenosynovitis in posterior tib, mild tendonitis in Achilles'. Best treatment?

Ankle MRI report - ant tib tendon bowing, tendonitis in ant tib, tenosynovitis in posterior tib, mild tendonitis  in Achilles'. Best treatment?

Cold compresses help: I have found that tendinitis frequently responds to application of cold compresses, particularly gel devices kept in a freezer which when applied to tendinitis will cut the inflammation down and provide comfort without the potential side effects of listed medications (which help as well but can cause considerable side effects). Such gel devices can be found in drug stores (OTC). ...Read more

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How is Achilles paratenonitis distinguished from Achilles tendonitis?

How is Achilles paratenonitis distinguished from Achilles tendonitis?

Irritat'n of cover'g: Initially, irritation of the outer covering of the tendon called the paratendon causes a paratendonitis. The word paratendonitis simply indicates that there is inflammation around the tendon. Inflammation of the tendocalcaneal bursa may also be present with the paratendonitis.Either of these conditions may be due to repeated overuse, or ill-fitting shoes that rub on the tendon. ...Read more

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What is the posterior tibial tendon dysfunction?

PT Dysfunction : Posterior tibial tendon in the foot and dysfunction is an extremely painful condition. Sometimes need brace, cast or walking boot with strapping to improve. Surgery is last resort. Try rice method. ...Read more

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Treatment for radial & longitudinal tears of the posterior horn medial meniscus, severe knee osteoarthrits moderate joint effusion, diffuse synovitis?

Treatment for radial & longitudinal tears of the posterior horn medial meniscus, severe knee osteoarthrits moderate joint effusion, diffuse synovitis?

Numerous : The most definitive option is a knee replacement. Knee arthroscopy is not likely to be helpful at this point. Various injections such as cortisone, hyaluronic acid/joint fluid or platelet-rich plasma are reasonable options. Meds, braces and PT are considerations. If I can help, then join my care team and virtual practice at www.healthtap.com/dr-clarkeholmes ...Read more

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Surgery? Degeneration posterior horn of meniscus, tendinosis/partial thickness tearing of patellar tendon at interpolar patella, subcutaneous edema

Surgery? Degeneration posterior horn of meniscus, tendinosis/partial thickness tearing of patellar tendon at interpolar patella,  subcutaneous edema

When nonop tx fails: Surgery is not usually the first line of treatment for chronic injuries such as you described: degenerative (chronic) PHMMT, and patellar tendinosis (vs partial inferio pole tear). Nonoperative management: physical therapy, stretching program, NSAIDs, rest, ice, may all help considerably. Arthroscopy to debride a degenerative meniscal tear due to persistent mechanical symptoms may be needed later. ...Read more

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Peroneal retinaculum repaired twice, peroneus brevis to longus tenodesis. New MRI shows hypertrophic tear of peroneus longus. What are my options?

Peroneal retinaculum repaired twice, peroneus brevis to longus tenodesis.  New MRI shows hypertrophic tear of peroneus longus.  What are my options?

I would try: And figure out what stresses are being placed on the tendon.....For whatever the reason it seems the peroneals have alot of pressure on them.....I would think of how to destrees or remove load from them or whatever is causing them to fail. ...Read more

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What causes lateral collateral ligament strain?

What causes lateral collateral ligament strain?

Large forces: Lateral collateral ligament strains are relatively uncommon. Lateral collateral injuries can occur with direct forceful blows to the inside of the knee, high energy trauma such as car accidents, motorcycle accidents, and falls from height. It can also be associated with other ligament injuries such as PCL and less commonly acl tears. ...Read more

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Are there any ankle-derived symptoms that differentiate posterior tibial tendonitis from posterior tibiotalar ligament tear?

Are there any ankle-derived symptoms that differentiate posterior tibial tendonitis from posterior tibiotalar ligament tear?

Can't stand on toes: With posterior tibial tendinitis (pttd), pain is present when attempting to stand on your toes. This pain is usually felt to be pronounced on the inner side of the arch from the ankle to the midfoot. The ligament is a discrete pain behind the ankle and is present with passive and active motion. Concern is noted when the tendon is torn, in this case, the patient has difficulty maintaining stance. ...Read more

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Mri says partial tear of anterior, posterior cruciate ligament, grade3 chondromalacia, subchondral cysts in medial tibial condyle, is operatn right thng?

Mri says partial tear of anterior, posterior cruciate ligament, grade3 chondromalacia, subchondral cysts in medial tibial condyle, is operatn right thng?

See good knee...: This is purely an MRI reading of your knee.'partial' acl and PCL tears in your age group means very little to me unless you had a very significant , recent knee injury w/ a hemarthrosis .( which u don't have).'chondromalacia'( of what..Mfc, lfc, patella?) means you have a component of arthritis in your knee. See a qualified, respected knee surgeon to discuss your options . Best of luck! ...Read more

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MRI Diagnosis of Horizontal undersurface tear posterior horn medial meniscus and Grade II Chondromalacia patella with trace knee effusion . Surgery?

MRI Diagnosis of Horizontal undersurface tear posterior horn medial meniscus and 
Grade II Chondromalacia patella with trace knee effusion . Surgery?

Obviously you have -: -symptoms, so if the trouble is locking, giving way, the findings indicate a mechanical problem in the knee. You need to follow the advice of your orthopedic surgeon who is familiar with your case, especially if you have treated with him/her for a while. The surgery is only driven by your symptoms. The thing to remember is there is no orth prob so severe that it can't be made worse by surgery. ...Read more

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I had multiplanar mri&impresion:chondromalacia of medial trochlear cartilage.Moderate popliteal cyst with mild joint effusion.Pes anserine bursitis, prepatellar&intrapat bursitis? Whats the treatment?Thanks

I had multiplanar mri&impresion:chondromalacia of medial trochlear cartilage.Moderate popliteal cyst with mild joint effusion.Pes anserine bursitis, prepatellar&intrapat bursitis? Whats the treatment?Thanks

Chondromalacia: Chondromalacia is damage to the cartilage surfaces of joints. In the knee it's similar to the wearing away of tire treads. This can cause inflammation which can produce increased fluid in the knee (effusion). If you have minimal pain and no locking, strengthening your thigh and leg muscles is recommended. Icing and anti inflammatories and pt can be helpful. Arthroscopy is recommended with locking. ...Read more

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