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Doctor insights on: Peripheral Vascular Resistance Test

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What are the tests for peripheral vascular disease?

What are the tests for peripheral vascular disease?

Begin with: Ankle brachial indices or segmental pressures to see if there is a problem. If these are positive cta of aorta and leg vessels should be performed. Conventional angiography used less often for diagnosis nowadays. See radiologyinfo. Org. ...Read more

Tolerance (Definition)

When one takes a drug, such as heroin or alcohol, repeatedly, 'tolerance' develops because more of the drug is needed to give the same effect on the body/brain; e.g. Liver enzymes r stimulated to metabolize the drug faster and faster. There may be a strong genetic predisposition to addiction, some studies suggesting that 1 of 10 people will become dependent on alcohol or some ...Read more


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Dx with peripheral vascular problems at 15 years of age, now 61 and finally getting tested. What should I expect?

Dx with peripheral vascular problems at 15 years of age, now 61 and finally getting tested. What should I expect?

Shame on you: I hope something good but waiting that long can allow bad things to progress and cause permanent damages, please try to see a physician regularly and especially for acute problems. We want you around here 61 more years :). ...Read more

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What is peripheral vascular occlusive disease with claudication? Is it serious?

What is peripheral vascular occlusive disease with claudication? Is it serious?

Clogged blood vessel: Claudication by definition is pain on exertion and relief of pain at rest. Typically it is pain legs on walking and goes away by stopping. Claudication is considered one of the early symptoms of vascular disease it can become serious if it keeps getting worse. ...Read more

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What is peripheral vascular occlusive disease with claudication? Is it serious?

Seriously Painful: Peripheral vascular occlusive disease w/ claudication means there are partial blockages of arteries in the legs. When person walks, the leg muscles become short of oxygen due to low blood flow resulting in pain. The pain is relieved by stopping & resting. It restricts many activities. Stopping smoking, getting regular exercise, controlling diabetes, etc. & using anticlotting agents like aspirin help. ...Read more

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What is peripheral vascular disease?

What is peripheral vascular disease?

Extremity disease: Peripheral artery disease refers to blood vessel disease which occurs outside the central core of the body, usually in the legs or arms, though erectile dysfunction is in fact also a form of peripheral artery disease. The symptoms of peripheral vascular disease vary based on the location and vessel affected. ...Read more

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What is defined as peripheral vascular disease?

What is defined as peripheral vascular disease?

Blockage in arteries: When the arteries in your legs become blocked, your legs do not receive enough blood or oxygen, -that's pvd!

pad can cause discomfort or pain when you walk. The pain can occur in your hips, buttocks, thighs, knees, or feet. Leg artery disease is considered a type of PVD because it affects the arteries, blood vessels that carry blood away from your heart to you. 1/3 people age 70 or older have pvd. ...Read more

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What the heck is peripheral vascular disease really?

What the heck is peripheral vascular disease really?

Narrow arteries: Peripheral vascular or peripheral arterial disease refers to a pathologic process where the arteries are weakened damaged or blocked. This is typically caused by plaque build up which is exacerbated by diet and smoking. ...Read more

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Which type of doctor specializes in peripheral vascular diseases?

Which type of doctor specializes in peripheral vascular diseases?

Vascular Surgeon: Don't let the name scare you...Vascular surgeons (unlike cardiologists and radiologists) are trained in all aspects of PVD management (not just surgery)

go to vascularweb. Org and search for a board-certified vascular surgeon near you. ...Read more

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Which type of doctor specializes in peripheral vascular diseases?

Vascular surgeon: Can offer both open and Endovascular options for treatment ...Read more

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What type of doctor specializes in treating peripheral vascular diseases?

What type of doctor specializes in treating peripheral vascular diseases?

Vascular surgeon: Vascular surgeons are specially trained to treat peripheral vascular disease both with our without surgery. This includes disease involving the aorta, arteries of the neck, limbs, and abdominal organs. Other specialties can treat some of these issues but a board-certified vascular surgeon is the best option for patients with these problems. ...Read more

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What type of doctor specializes in treating peripheral vascular diseases?

What type of doctor specializes in treating peripheral vascular diseases?

Vascular Surgeon: Vascular surgery is a medical discipline that deals with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases and problems of the arterial, venous and lymphatic systems, exclusive of the heart. Interventional treatment can be both surgical and non-surgical (i.e. Catheter based and minimally invasive) and as such, make vascular surgeons uniquely qualified to provide unbiased recommendations for patients. ...Read more

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Can you die from peripheral vascular disease?

Can you die from peripheral vascular disease?

Yes you can: Peripheral vascular disease and cardiovascular disease are the number one killer. They kill by cardiovascular events; such as stroke, heart attack, sudden death, limb loss, organ failure, hemorrhage or bleeding out. Often no warning to the patient or doc, before a vascular event. Patients and doctors have to work as a team to diagnose and treat before event occurs. ...Read more

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Define for me what peripheral vascular disease is?

Plaque in legs: Peripheral vascular disease (pvd), also known as peripheral arterial occlusive disease (paod) or arteriosclerosis obliterans, refers to occlusion or stenosis of arteries, usually in the lower extremities. ...Read more

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What are symptoms of peripheral vascular disease?

Follow below: Difficulty walking requiring to stop after a certain distance is usually the first symptom this occurs because the blood flow is inadequate to supply the muscle when active
other issues wounds that are difficult to heal. ...Read more

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Is peripheral vascular disease considered reversible?

Is peripheral vascular disease considered reversible?

Not really: Peripheral vascular disease is not necessarily reversible, but its risk can be successfully managed. The pillars of treatment are, 1) smoking cessation, 2) anti- platelet therapy (aspirin/ plavix), and 3) statin therapy to lower cholesterol. There have been anecdotal reports of plaque reversal but this does not happen for everybody. ...Read more

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What is peripheral vascular disease? Can it be treated?

Yes it can.: Your arteries are normally smooth and unobstructed. Over time they can become blocked (atherosclerosis - hardening of the arteries). Plaque can build up in the walls of your arteries. Plaque is made up of cholesterol, calcium, and fibrous tissue. As more plaque builds up, your arteries narrow and stiffen. Eventually, enough plaque builds up to reduce blood flow and oxygen delivery. This is pvd. ...Read more

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Peripheral vascular diseases always or only sometimes predicts carotid disease?

Sometimes: Athersclerosis is a systemic disease. This means it can affect any and all arteries. Having evidence of atherosclerosis in any arterial bed increase the risk of having it in others. However, it is not uncommon to find atherosclerosis affecting only certain arteries (legs) and not others (carotids). Why this occurs is not fully understood. If you have pad, you have 2x the risk of stroke or mi. ...Read more

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What are common symptoms of peripheral vascular disease?

What are common symptoms of peripheral vascular disease?

Peripheral vascular: Peripheral artery disease, or "pad" is a blood vessel condition that is usually the result of progressive plaque build-up within the walls of arteries than leads to blockage of blood flow. It can cause leg pain when walking, usually in the calves, pain at rest in the foot or leg, leg numbness or tinlging, coldness or discoloration of the skin, foot or leg ulcers, gangrene, poor healing of wounds. ...Read more

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What to do if I have severe peripheral vascular disease?

First consult: A vascular surgeon, who is a specialist in this disorder. He can offer arterial reconstruction or stenting, if your condition is severe. ...Read more

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What are the best home remedies for peripheral vascular disease?

What are the best home remedies for peripheral vascular disease?

Following advice: The best home remedies for PVD (pad) would be to watch your diet, keep your weight down, don't smoke, and get exercise. All of those can be done without medication. ...Read more

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What is the definition or description of: peripheral vascular disease?

What is the definition or description of: peripheral vascular disease?

Depends: Pvd is a catch-all term that may indicate venous or arterial dz. Usually docs use this term to indicate blockages (plaque buildup) in the arteries. However, some docs refer to swelling and discoloration as PVD as well. ...Read more

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Is there any effective medicine that treats peripheral vascular disease?

Is there any effective medicine that treats peripheral vascular disease?

Yes: There are several medications that are useful for pad. These include the statin medications (for cholesterol), which stabilize plaques, aspirin/plavix- platelet medications, and cilostazol- which improves the distance you are able to walk. None of these medications will eliminate vascular disease once it has developed, but they will all work in different ways to help control or improve symptoms. ...Read more

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What are some exercises that I can do to treat peripheral vascular disease?

Walk: Supervised exercise programs have been shown to increase the distance people with peripheral vascular disease can walk. This doesn't necessarily heal the diseased arteries, but your body develops what we call a "collateral circulation" to help improve blood flow. ...Read more

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Can there be any effectilve medicine to treat peripheral vascular disease?

Medical treatment: If you mean treating the systemic effects of peripheral arterial disease (pad), such as atherosclerosis and particularly with coronary artery disease, there are a number of medications available. If you mean specifically for the symptoms of pad in the legs, most commonly intermittent claudication (ic), Cilostazol has been proven to be quite effective in reducing the severity of ic. Talk with pcp. ...Read more

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What happens with peripheral vascular disease over 2-3 years after diagnosis?

What happens with peripheral vascular disease over 2-3 years after diagnosis?

Depends: This depends on lifestyle modification - smoking cessation, compliance with medication, and exercise. ...Read more

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How is smoking related to peripheral vascular disease?

How is smoking related to peripheral vascular disease?

Damages vessels: Smoking directly damages the blood vessel walls, causing blockages. ...Read more

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How are arteriosclerosis and peripheral vascular disease different?

PVD/PAD/atherosclero: Pvd/pad/atherosclerosis are one in the same. Plaque causes stenosis of arteries. Plaque can be soft or heavily calcified. Board certified surgeons should be able to offer you the best treatment options depending on location, quality of symptoms and co-morbidities. Vascular surgeon can offer all therapies including endovascular, open and medical modalities. ...Read more

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Are diabetics more prone to peripheral vascular disease? Why?

Are diabetics more prone to peripheral vascular disease? Why?

Yes, vascular risks: People with type 2 diabetes not only have high sugars, but also likely have the Insulin resistance syndrome, including high blood pressure, high triglycerides, low HDL chol, increased tendency to clot, increased inflammation. All of these factors promote atherogenic (plaque) disease in blood vessels, leading to higher risk of stroke, peripheral vascular disease, and coronary heart disease. ...Read more

Dr. Katharine Cox
5 Doctors shared insights

Vascular (Definition)

"vasculum" ...Read more