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Doctor insights on: Peripheral Vascular Disease Ulcers

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What causes peripheral vascular disease?

What causes peripheral vascular disease?

PVD: read this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peripheral_vascular_disease

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Dr. Joel Gotvald
331 doctors shared insights

Vascular Disease (Definition)

The vascular system is made up with 3 components, arteries, veins, and lymph channels. The most common description of vascular disease is usually associated with arterial insufficiency, also known as PAD. This usually is more of an issue as people age, who also have associated medical conditions to include diabetes, hypertension, heart ...Read more


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Could peripheral vascular disease cause heart attack?

Could peripheral vascular disease cause heart attack?

NO: Coronary artery disease can cause a heart attack, not peripheral vascular disease. "Peripheral" refers to the extremities (arms & legs), so PVD is blood vessel disease that affects the arms or legs (not the heart). Peripheral artery disease does increase the chances that the same individual may have coronary artery disease of the heart, so it is reasonable to screen PAD partients for heart dis. ...Read more

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What is peripheral vascular disease?

What is peripheral vascular disease?

Extremity disease: Peripheral artery disease refers to blood vessel disease which occurs outside the central core of the body, usually in the legs or arms, though erectile dysfunction is in fact also a form of peripheral artery disease. The symptoms of peripheral vascular disease vary based on the location and vessel affected. ...Read more

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Are femoral bruits associated with peripheral vascular disease?

Are femoral bruits associated with peripheral vascular disease?

Often they are: A bruit is a noise that is heard with a stethoscope reflecting turbulent flow. IT can be a normal finding and is non specific. It is often associated with narrowing of arteries, however that is unlikely in a 33 year old. THe pest way to tell if you have "PVD" is to have a physician measure the pressure in your feet and calculate an "ABI" (foot pressure/arm pressure) value of 0.9 or more is normal ...Read more

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Can anemia be associated with peripheral vascular disease pvd?

Can anemia be associated with peripheral vascular disease pvd?

Not usually: Peripheral vascular disease is most commonly caused by hardening of the arteries from cholesterol deposits and that shouldn't cause anemia. There are a few unusual causes of peripheral vascular problems from rheumatologic diseases which can be associated with anemia but even if you have both, more common causes of anemia need to be ruled out before assuming they are related. ...Read more

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Can peripheral vascular disease cause eye pain?

Can peripheral vascular disease cause eye pain?

Yes: Vascular disease of the eye leads to ocular ischemic syndrome which causes visual disturbances as well as pain. Seek immediate help. ...Read more

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Which antiplatelet agents help peripheral vascular disease?

Which antiplatelet agents help peripheral vascular disease?

Aspirin / Plavix (clopidogrel): Aspirin and Plavix (clopidogrel) are the most commonly used anti-platelet agents. ...Read more

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What are the differences between peripheral arterial disease and peripheral venous disease?

What are  the differences between peripheral arterial disease and peripheral venous disease?

Different vessels: Arteries carry oxygenated "nutritious" blood to veins carry the "used up" blood that has the cellular wastes back from the tissues to be cleansed. Artery disease means that the tissues starve from lack of food. Vein disease means they cannot get rid of their wastes. Vein disease occurs from ankles to knees with ulcers, brown staining and swelling. Artery disease occurs at toes, bluish color/cold. ...Read more

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How are arteriosclerosis and peripheral vascular disease different?

How are arteriosclerosis and peripheral vascular disease different?

PVD/PAD/atherosclero: Pvd/pad/atherosclerosis are one in the same. Plaque causes stenosis of arteries. Plaque can be soft or heavily calcified. Board certified surgeons should be able to offer you the best treatment options depending on location, quality of symptoms and co-morbidities. Vascular surgeon can offer all therapies including endovascular, open and medical modalities. ...Read more

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Can you explain the difference between pad (peripheral artery disease) and pvd (peripheral vascular disease)?

Actually None: The diseases involved and the problems caused are essentially the same. But over time it has become standard to refer to these problems as pad. ...Read more

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Is there a difference between peripheral arterial disease and peripheral venous disease?

Is there a difference between peripheral arterial disease and peripheral venous disease?

Yes: They are completely different. Venous disease is somewhat genetic, but if people lived long enough almost everyone would probably get venous disease at some point in their life. In fact 15% of the adult population has venous disease. Arterial disease, in contrast, is not as common in the general population. It occurs in smokers, diabetics, and in people with high blood pressure and cholesterol. ...Read more

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Peripheral vascular diseases always or only sometimes predicts carotid disease?

Peripheral vascular diseases always or only sometimes predicts carotid disease?

Sometimes: Athersclerosis is a systemic disease. This means it can affect any and all arteries. Having evidence of atherosclerosis in any arterial bed increase the risk of having it in others. However, it is not uncommon to find atherosclerosis affecting only certain arteries (legs) and not others (carotids). Why this occurs is not fully understood. If you have pad, you have 2x the risk of stroke or mi. ...Read more

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Is peripheral vascular disease considered reversible?

Is peripheral vascular disease considered reversible?

Not really: Peripheral vascular disease is not necessarily reversible, but its risk can be successfully managed. The pillars of treatment are, 1) smoking cessation, 2) anti- platelet therapy (aspirin/ plavix), and 3) statin therapy to lower cholesterol. There have been anecdotal reports of plaque reversal but this does not happen for everybody. ...Read more

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What is the difference between peripheral arterial disease and peripheral venous disease?

What is the difference between peripheral arterial disease and peripheral venous disease?

Artery vs vein: think of one (Periph artery disease) as problems with the vessels in charge of delivering blood, oxygen. and nutrients to the tissues and the other (peripheral venous disease) as problems with the vessels in charge of returning that blood to the heart. ...Read more

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What are symptoms of peripheral vascular disease?

What are symptoms of  peripheral vascular disease?

Follow below: Difficulty walking requiring to stop after a certain distance is usually the first symptom this occurs because the blood flow is inadequate to supply the muscle when active other issues wounds that are difficult to heal. ...Read more

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What are peripheral artery disease symptoms?

What are peripheral artery disease symptoms?

Vary Widely: The symptoms can include pain, numbness, weakness, wounds, gangrene, or slow healing of the affected extremity. The most common early sign is claudication, which is defined as muscle discomfort or cramping brought on by exercise & relieved with rest. Chronic pain in the leg or foot, often a achiness or burning, is also common. Get testing w/ ultrasound or blood pressures of the legs by vascular MD ...Read more

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Ulceration (Definition)

Exact synonym so far as this pathologist is concerned. An ulcer is a lesion on a body surface (outer or inner) in which the epithelium and at least some of the underlying connective tissue has been lost specifically to necrosis (cell death) rather than just mechanical or chemical injury. All ulcer craters ...Read more


Dr. Scott Bolhack
2,127 doctors shared insights

Ulcer (Definition)

An ulcer is a discontinuity or a break in a body membrane that impedes the normal functioning of the organ of which that membrane is a part. Ulcers are further classified by their location. Ulcers are usually caused by infections, excessive acid production, stress, ...Read more