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Doctor insights on: Peripheral Vascular Disease Treatment

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Can you die from peripheral vascular disease?

Can you die from peripheral vascular disease?

Yes you can: Peripheral vascular disease and cardiovascular disease are the number one killer. They kill by cardiovascular events; such as stroke, heart attack, sudden death, limb loss, organ failure, hemorrhage or bleeding out. Often no warning to the patient or doc, before a vascular event. Patients and doctors have to work as a team to diagnose and treat before event occurs. ...Read more

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Dr. Joel Gotvald
318 doctors shared insights

Vascular Disease (Definition)

The vascular system is made up with 3 components, arteries, veins, and lymph channels. The most common description of vascular disease is usually associated with arterial insufficiency, also known as PAD. This usually is more of an issue as people age, who also have associated medical conditions to include diabetes, hypertension, heart ...Read more


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Define for me what peripheral vascular disease is?

Define for me what peripheral vascular disease is?

Plaque in legs: Peripheral vascular disease (pvd), also known as peripheral arterial occlusive disease (paod) or arteriosclerosis obliterans, refers to occlusion or stenosis of arteries, usually in the lower extremities. ...Read more

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What are symptoms of peripheral vascular disease?

What are symptoms of  peripheral vascular disease?

Follow below: Difficulty walking requiring to stop after a certain distance is usually the first symptom this occurs because the blood flow is inadequate to supply the muscle when active other issues wounds that are difficult to heal. ...Read more

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What are the tests for peripheral vascular disease?

What are the tests for peripheral vascular disease?

Begin with: Ankle brachial indices or segmental pressures to see if there is a problem. If these are positive cta of aorta and leg vessels should be performed. Conventional angiography used less often for diagnosis nowadays. See radiologyinfo.Org. ...Read more

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Is peripheral vascular disease considered reversible?

Is peripheral vascular disease considered reversible?

Not really: Peripheral vascular disease is not necessarily reversible, but its risk can be successfully managed. The pillars of treatment are, 1) smoking cessation, 2) anti- platelet therapy (aspirin/ plavix), and 3) statin therapy to lower cholesterol. There have been anecdotal reports of plaque reversal but this does not happen for everybody. ...Read more

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What is peripheral vascular disease? Can it be treated?

Yes it can.: Your arteries are normally smooth and unobstructed. Over time they can become blocked (atherosclerosis - hardening of the arteries). Plaque can build up in the walls of your arteries. Plaque is made up of cholesterol, calcium, and fibrous tissue. As more plaque builds up, your arteries narrow and stiffen. Eventually, enough plaque builds up to reduce blood flow and oxygen delivery. This is pvd. ...Read more

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Are diabetics more prone to peripheral vascular disease? Why?

Are diabetics more prone to peripheral vascular disease? Why?

Yes, vascular risks: People with type 2 diabetes not only have high sugars, but also likely have the Insulin resistance syndrome, including high blood pressure, high triglycerides, low HDL chol, increased tendency to clot, increased inflammation. All of these factors promote atherogenic (plaque) disease in blood vessels, leading to higher risk of stroke, peripheral vascular disease, and coronary heart disease. ...Read more

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Is peripheral vascular disease the same thing as hypertension?

No: Hypertension is abnormally high blood pressure. This can contribute to a different problem- peripheral vascular disease (otherwise known as pad, "hardening of the arteries, " atherosclerosis, and other names). ...Read more

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Md wants to treat peripheral vascular disease. What if I don't?

Md wants to treat peripheral vascular disease. What if I don't?

Gets worse: Treat now or you will regret it later. Exercise, eat right, no smoking, BP control, diabetes control. Cholesterol control. See your doctor and develope a plan. ...Read more

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Are femoral bruits associated with peripheral vascular disease?

Are femoral bruits associated with peripheral vascular disease?

Often they are: A bruit is a noise that is heard with a stethoscope reflecting turbulent flow. IT can be a normal finding and is non specific. It is often associated with narrowing of arteries, however that is unlikely in a 33 year old. THe pest way to tell if you have "PVD" is to have a physician measure the pressure in your feet and calculate an "ABI" (foot pressure/arm pressure) value of 0.9 or more is normal ...Read more

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Why are diabetics more prone to getting peripheral vascular disease?

Why are diabetics more prone to getting peripheral vascular disease?

Bad for vessels. : Hyperglycemia has direct effect on the lining of blood vessels. This causes oxidative stress, vessel constriction, sticky platelets, abnormal clotting factors, lipid release and inflammation. Please control your glucose. ...Read more

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Can you tell me the pathophysiology of the peripheral vascular disease?

Can you tell me the pathophysiology of the peripheral vascular disease?

Atherosclerosis: The pathophysiology of peripheral vascular disease is atherosclerosis. This is a generalized disease process with risk factors including diabetes, old age, high blood pressure, elevated cholesterol and smoking. Atherosclerosis builds up, causing narrowed areas in blood vessels. Some important vessels which get blocked include; carotids, heart vessels (coronary) and leg arteries. ...Read more

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What is the difference between atherosclerosis and peripheral vascular disease?

What is the difference between atherosclerosis and peripheral vascular disease?

Location, location: Atherosclerosis is the deposit of fat inside the lumen of an artery. If the blockages are severe enough and that happens in the heart, can lead to heart attack, if in the brain: strokes and if in the arteries going to or of the legs: PVD ...Read more

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Is peripheral vascular disease also known as hypertension or just happens together?

Is peripheral vascular disease also known as hypertension or just happens together?

Peripheral Vascular: In addition, hypertension is one of the risk factors associated with Peripheral Vascular Disease (PVD). Poor management of these risk factors can put you at risk for PVD. Those risk factors are: 1. Smoking; 2. Diabetes; 3. Hypertension; 4. High Cholesterol; 5. Over the age of 50; 6. Family history of PVD. Being overweight can also contribute. Please see a Vascular Surgeon to be evaluated. ...Read more

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I have peripheral vascular disease can I quit my pack a day habit cold turkey or should I ween off?

I have peripheral vascular disease can I quit my pack a day habit cold turkey or should I ween off?

?: Margaret514, if you are really 26 as your profile states, the likelihood that you have peripheral vascular disease is close to zero, even though you smoke. I certainly applaud your resolve to quit though. The sooner the better. Quitting cold turkey will not harm you, although it's never easy. Good luck, my friend! ...Read more

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Is it possible to please tell me the what are chronic venous insufficiency and peripheral vascular disease?

Magnitude of risk: Pad aka PVD or diseased arteries carries risk for major events, heart attack, stroke, limb loss, death. While venous insufficiency is common and benefits from treatment, it does not carry risk of life and limb. That is the biggest difference between the two. They are both involving blood conduits. ...Read more

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Can you please tell me the difference between chronic venous insufficiency and peripheral vascular disease?

Can you please tell me the difference between chronic venous insufficiency and peripheral vascular disease?

In vs. out flow: Chronic venous insufficiency results from valve dysfunction in the venous system. This causes the pressure in the veins just under the skin to become too high resulting in swelling of the veins. These veins enlarge and become varicose, leak water causing leg swelling, leak blood resulting in skin discoloration. Ulcers can occur. PVD is the result of blockages in the arteries supplying blood. ...Read more

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Dr. Joel Gotvald
421 doctors shared insights

Peripheral Vascular Disease (Definition)

A narrowing of the peripheral arteries to the legs, stomach, arms, and head--most commonly in the arteries of the legs. PAD is similar to ...Read more


Dr. Joel Gotvald
295 doctors shared insights

Vascular Conditions (Definition)

Vascular conditions = diseases of the circulatory ...Read more