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Doctor insights on: Peripheral Arterial Tonometry

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Could an ECG detect pad -peripheral arterial disease?

Could an ECG detect pad -peripheral arterial disease?

ECG: Ecg records electrical activity from the heart. There are no ECG findings which would 'detect' peripheral arterial disease. There are ECG findings which suggest heart artery disease and artery disease is not usually localized to only one vascular bed so pad would be probable if CAD were present. ...Read more

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Dr. Herman Hammerstead
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Artery (Definition)

Arteries are defined as blood vessels which carry blood away from the heart (to either the body or lungs). Arteries: higher pressure, thicker walls, stretch (pulse) with each heart contraction & deliver blood to the arterioles which control the flow to individual capillaries. Veins are blood vessels which carry blood from capillaries back to the heart (body to right heart; ...Read more


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What tests confirm peripheral arterial disease?

What tests  confirm peripheral arterial disease?

ABI/PRESSURES: Ankle brachial index(abi) measures the difference in blood pressures between the arms and legs and arterial ultrasound which is a type of imaging test can be used in conjunction with this to establish this diagnosis along with an appropriate history. ...Read more

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Dr. Ted King Dr. King
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Can you explain the difference between pad (peripheral artery disease) and pvd (peripheral vascular disease)?

Dr. Ted King Dr. King
13 doctors agreed:
Can you explain the difference between pad (peripheral artery disease) and pvd (peripheral vascular disease)?

They are the same: We prefer to use the term pad now but when people use the older term, pvd, they mean the same thing. ...Read more

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Is there a difference between peripheral arterial disease and peripheral venous disease?

Is there a difference between peripheral arterial disease and peripheral venous disease?

Yes: They are completely different. Venous disease is somewhat genetic, but if people lived long enough almost everyone would probably get venous disease at some point in their life. In fact 15% of the adult population has venous disease. Arterial disease, in contrast, is not as common in the general population. It occurs in smokers, diabetics, and in people with high blood pressure and cholesterol. ...Read more

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What are the differences between peripheral arterial disease and peripheral venous disease?

What are  the differences between peripheral arterial disease and peripheral venous disease?

Different vessels: Arteries carry oxygenated "nutritious" blood to veins carry the "used up" blood that has the cellular wastes back from the tissues to be cleansed. Artery disease means that the tissues starve from lack of food. Vein disease means they cannot get rid of their wastes. Vein disease occurs from ankles to knees with ulcers, brown staining and swelling. Artery disease occurs at toes, bluish color/cold. ...Read more

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What is the difference between peripheral arterial disease and peripheral venous disease?

What is the difference between peripheral arterial disease and peripheral venous disease?

Artery vs vein: think of one (Periph artery disease) as problems with the vessels in charge of delivering blood, oxygen. and nutrients to the tissues and the other (peripheral venous disease) as problems with the vessels in charge of returning that blood to the heart. ...Read more

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What are the differences between ischaemic optic neuropathy and retinal artery occulsion?

What are the differences between ischaemic optic neuropathy and retinal artery occulsion?

Difficult to answer: If one distinguishes between anterior and posterior ischemic optic neuropathy this is easier to answer as the former is almost always caused by giant cell arteritis and treated with prednisone and the latter is due to systemic atherosclerosis. Acute central retinal artery occlusion may be caused by carotid occlusion or dissection or cardioembolic events. Treatment includes hyperbaric O2. ...Read more

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What is peripheral vascular disease?

Extremity disease: Peripheral artery disease refers to blood vessel disease which occurs outside the central core of the body, usually in the legs or arms, though erectile dysfunction is in fact also a form of peripheral artery disease. The symptoms of peripheral vascular disease vary based on the location and vessel affected. ...Read more

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Dr. Laura Pak Dr. Pak
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Can you naturally reverse atherosclerosis, poor circulation, peripheral artery disease?

Dr. Laura Pak Dr. Pak
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Can you naturally reverse atherosclerosis, poor circulation, peripheral artery disease?

You can slow it down: We start to develop atherosclerosis in our 30's and generally it progresses as we age. People who have a family history of heart disease or stroke are more susceptible. You can slow down the progression of this disease by watching your cholesterol, keeping your blood pressure in check, attaining your ideal body weight and quitting smoking. Regular exercise, stress management and good eating helps! ...Read more

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Describe retinal vein occlusion?

Describe retinal vein occlusion?

Eye vessel problem: Retinal vein which drains the blood out of the eye gets occluded. This causes blurryness of vision, sometimes loss of vision. It can come suddendly. Elevated blood pressure and patients with diabetes are some of the risk factors. New treatments are available to control some of the problems due to closure of blood vessels in the eye. ...Read more

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What is mild retinal vascular tortuosity?

What is mild retinal vascular tortuosity?

HTN retinopathy: Hypertension causes changes in the blood vessels of the retina, known as hypertensive retinopathy. One of these changes is an increase in the bending and waviness of the blood vessels along their path. Another change is hardening of the arteries, shown recently to be a precursor of dementia. Get checked for high blood pressure. This is a warning sign that can save you from death or disability. ...Read more

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Peripheral vascular diseases always or only sometimes predicts carotid disease?

Peripheral vascular diseases always or only sometimes predicts carotid disease?

Sometimes: Athersclerosis is a systemic disease. This means it can affect any and all arteries. Having evidence of atherosclerosis in any arterial bed increase the risk of having it in others. However, it is not uncommon to find atherosclerosis affecting only certain arteries (legs) and not others (carotids). Why this occurs is not fully understood. If you have pad, you have 2x the risk of stroke or mi. ...Read more

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Please explain why is pulmonary arterial blood pressure less than systemic arterial blood pressure?

Please explain why is pulmonary arterial blood pressure less than systemic arterial blood pressure?

PAP: The resistance to flow of blood is much lower in the lung than in the systemic circulation, this is why the pa pressure is normally lower than systemic pressure, the blood flow in both circuits is normally the same and pressure equals flow times resistance. ...Read more

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Are femoral bruits associated with peripheral vascular disease?

Are femoral bruits associated with peripheral vascular disease?

Often they are: A bruit is a noise that is heard with a stethoscope reflecting turbulent flow. IT can be a normal finding and is non specific. It is often associated with narrowing of arteries, however that is unlikely in a 33 year old. THe pest way to tell if you have "PVD" is to have a physician measure the pressure in your feet and calculate an "ABI" (foot pressure/arm pressure) value of 0.9 or more is normal ...Read more

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Is 700/0 carotid artery narrowing a TIA symtom?

Is 700/0 carotid artery narrowing a TIA symtom?

Not clear: Your question is not clear. Please reframe the question to get correct answer. ...Read more

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Tonometry (Definition)

Tonometry is the technique for measuring the internal pressure of the eye. It is done by ophthalmologists with a device called a goldmann tonometer which is the most accurate. Optoms use air puff and there are a few hand held devices. The measurement is ...Read more