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Doctor insights on: Perforated Gangrenous Appendicitis

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How long does the pain continue after having a gangrenous appendix removed?

How long does the pain continue after having a gangrenous appendix removed?

It depends: Some people get better within a few days, others take a few weeks. Everyone is different. ...Read more

Dr. Barry Rosen
1,104 Doctors shared insights

Appendicitis (Definition)

The inflammation of the appendix which can cause right lower quadrant pain that radiates and ...Read more


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Had gallbladder, out the old way out in may 2013, due to stones and it was gangrenous - how long would that have taken for this to occur?

Had gallbladder, out the old way out in may 2013, due to stones and it was gangrenous - how long would that have taken for this to occur?

Hmmmm: Few days to turn infected gallbladder to gangreene gallblader given the right condition. But luckily, the body does a good job at controlling and containing the infection at the gallbladder site. Glad you got over this serious problem. ...Read more

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I was in the ER and needed lifesaving emergency surgery had a gangrenous gallbladder what would have happened if nobody was there to give consent?

I was in the ER and needed lifesaving emergency surgery had a gangrenous gallbladder what would have happened if nobody was there to give consent?

Physician consent: In an emergency licensing situation tif wo physicians agree that surgery is necessary and potentially life saving then they can give consent so you still would have gotten surgery you needed. Glad you are ok. ...Read more

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Why are blood work high after having a gangrenous gallbladder remove 3 weeks ago and I still have jaundice?

Why are blood work high after having a gangrenous gallbladder remove 3 weeks ago and I still have jaundice?

It all depends on-: -the amount of damage that was sustained by your liver. Many times the liver takes a while 2 recover. It also depends on renal function 2 remove the bilirubin from the blood & tissue. ...Read more

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My dad is 91 with Parkinson's & recently had a stroke and has a gangrenous toe. Which is less painful, dying from gangrene or having an amputation?

My dad is 91 with Parkinson's & recently had a stroke and has a gangrenous toe. Which is less painful, dying from gangrene or having an amputation?

Gangrene: The gangrenous toe will not necessarily kill him. Nor will an amputation. However, the gangrenous toe will probably demarcate and actually fall of on its own. Seek the advise of both your podiatrist and a vascular specialist - who will be working together in his care. ...Read more

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Had gangrenous gallbladder lap removed 5 weeks ago. Have pain under right lung when I breathe deeply. Dr. Says recovery takes longer. Yes? Other reason?

Had gangrenous gallbladder lap removed 5 weeks ago. Have pain under right lung when I breathe deeply. Dr. Says recovery takes longer. Yes? Other reason?

RUQ pain: Pain with respiration could be from the lung lining (pleura) rubbing against the same on the chest wall or some peritoneal (abdominal cavity lining) inflammation. If you are not doing better or other symptoms are present - fever, shortness of breath, nausea/vomiting, cough, etc, you may need to have those addressed and further work up done. If subsiding and no other symptoms, wait and see. ...Read more

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Who treats appendicitis?

Who treats appendicitis?

General Surgeons: Appendectomy is the "bread-and-butter" surgery of general surgeons (available 24-7). ...Read more

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Tell me about appendicitis?

Tell me about appendicitis?

Acute inflammation: The appendix is connected to the large intestine - appendicitis is when the appendix opening is blocked, causing increased pressure and then pain, usually as mid-abdominal pain. As the wall of the appendix stretches and the blood flow decreases, bacterial infection and inflammation causes irritation and the pain localizes to the area around the appendix. The risk is rupture, causing peritonitis. ...Read more

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Can appendicitis be chronic?

Exceptionally rare.: 99.9% of the time, inflammation of the appendix will lead to rupture within 2-4 days if left untreated. "chronic" appendicitis represents the very rare patient whose appendicitis resolves without treatment, only to recur at a later time. Nevertheless, if I were to evaluate someone with chronic abdominal pain, this would be very low on my "differential diagnosis". ...Read more

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How does appendicitis start?

How does appendicitis start?

Lumen blockage: Usually, appendicitis starts from occlusion of the lumen of the hollow appendix. This can be from a small piece of stool, seed, tumor, parasite, or swollen lymph within the organ. It usually progresses to rupture in about 24-48 hours. I hope this helps. Good luck. ...Read more

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Can adults get appendicitis?

Yes: Anyone with an appendix can get acute appendicitis. The incidence of appendicitis is higher in certain age groups, but affects people over a wide spectrum of ages. I have done appendectomies in 7 year olds and 87 year olds. ...Read more

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How do I know if appendicitis?

How do I know if appendicitis?

See your doctor: It's unsafe to self diagnose or let your family and friends fill the role of a doctor - even if they have had appendicitis. Although many patients report nausea, anorexia and frequently right lower abdominal pain with appendicitis, there are many variables that will change your clinical presentation. It is a common problem with an usually simple surgical solution - don't take a chance. ...Read more

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How can appendicitis pain start?

How can appendicitis pain start?

Start of pain: Is usually located around the umbilicus or in upper mid abdomen. Then it goes to right lower area. This is because, at the start, the main problem is cramping in the appendix and the nerves go to the small intestines. As the inflammation progresses, it causes local irritation in the right lower quadrant, where it induces pain. ...Read more

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Can appendicitis pain last months?

Can appendicitis pain last months?

Rare: Very unusual. Usually with appendicitis you have around 24 hours from the onset of pain until the appendix ruptures. Once it ruptures, the pain is so severe it gets evaluated and fixed. There is chronic appendicitis, but it is less understood. Mild pain that comes and goes and sometimes it does last months or even years. This is not usually seen prior to surgery. Usually seen months later. ...Read more

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How likely is getting appendicitis?

How likely is getting appendicitis?

Statistics: Statistical analysis showed the risk of appendicitis is 6 to 8% in the us, slightly higher for males, from a 1990 study from cdc. (http://www. Ncbi. Nlm. Nih. Gov/pubmed/2239906). ...Read more

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Is appendicitis in children common?

It is: Quite common. And sometimes it can be difficult to diagnose, especially in young children who cannot give an accurate history or cooperate with a physical exam. Take your child to pediatrician if you suspect appendicitis. ...Read more

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How do I know if I have appendicitis?

How do I know if I have appendicitis?

See your Dr: Appendicitis usually will cause pain in your right lower abdomen, often accompanied by nausea, vomiting, and fever. Problem is, there are a number of other problems with similar symptoms, and ocassionally appendicitis will present with pain in the back, or lower in the pelvis depending on where your appendix actually is. If you are concerned, see your dr. ...Read more

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Can you tell me if it's appendicitis?

Can you tell me if it's appendicitis?

No, you should. ..: See your doc. The early symptoms of appendicitis are abdominal pain that starts diffusely or around the bellybutton and then localizes to the right lower quadrant (rlq) of the abdomen; some nausea, maybe vomiting; and decreased appetite. Early signs of appendicitis are tenderness that ultimately localizes to the rlq; there is discomfort with movement (e.g., the bumps in the road cause pain). ...Read more

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How to know if I've got appendicitis?

Rebound pain: Appendicitis begins in the lining of the appendix and has the associated pain referred to the unbilicus. One has a feeling of nauseau with the pain slowly shifing from the unbilicus to the right lower quad. When pressure is exerted there and suddenly release this is the rebound tenderness seen with appendicitis. At WBC should be performed and possibly an abdominal x ray for an appendicolith. ...Read more