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Doctor insights on: Pathophysiology Of Urolithiasis

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Is not true re: urolithiasis?

Is not true re: urolithiasis?

Please rephrase?: What aspects of urolithiasis are you referring to as possibly not being true? ...Read more

Dr. Michael Steigner
148 Doctors shared insights

Bladder Stones (Definition)

Also known as urolithiasis, these are kidney stones that can be found in the urinary tract, which may cause no symptoms or may result pain in the groin and abdomen, nausea, bloody urine, ...Read more


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What are the tests for urolithiasis?

What are the tests for urolithiasis?

Urinary & radiologic: Urinalysis to detect presence of blood or cystine, microscopy can detect crystals. Timed urinary excretion, commonly 24 hrs, for calcium, uric acid, citrate or oxalates. Kidney & bladder ultrasound, plain abdominal x-ray (kub) and most reliable of all is abdominal ct scan. ...Read more

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What are the symptoms of urolithiasis?

Variable: May be asymptomatic, but can cause the worst colicky pain conceivable, often with nausea, vomiting and inability to achieve a comfortable position. Can cause blood in urine and urinary symptoms when stone approaches bladder. ...Read more

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What is meant by bilateral urolithiasis?

What is meant by bilateral urolithiasis?

Stones, both sides.: Urolithiasis are stones in the urinary tract, such as a kidney stone, ureteral stone, or bladder stone. Bilateral means both sides. Since the body has two kidneys, one of the left and one on the right, the phrase "bilateral urolithiasis" could simply mean that there is a kidney stone on the left and right sides of the body. ...Read more

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What is varicocele urolithiasis?

What is varicocele urolithiasis?

Here is...: I assumed you probably meant varicocele phlebolith, not urolithiasis. Urolithiasis denotes stones forming inside urinary tract - kidneys, ureters, ; bladder. Phlebolith indicates stone formed inside vein, usually at its valves as the phlebolith commonly seen in pelvic veins in imaging study, which carries no practical weight in clinical care. So, I assumed stones similarly forms inside varicocele. ...Read more

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What is the treatment for urolithiasis?

What is the treatment for urolithiasis?

Removal & prevention: Pain management if necessary. Elimination of stones, by natural means if small enough to pass on their own + copious fluid intake or by IV &? Flomax (tamsulosin) to help ureter dilate & facilitate passage. May require ureteral stenting in presence of significant obstruction. Cystoscopic or ureteroscopic laser lithotripsy or basket extraction. Shockwave lithotripsy. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy. Then prevention. ...Read more

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What is the definition or description of: Urolithiasis?

What is the definition or description of: Urolithiasis?

Stone in u-tract...: Urolithiasis is Uro (urinary) + lithiasis (stone formation = urinary stone formation resulting usually from kidney functional defects in stone-inhibiting substance and acidity aumation and adjustment leading to insufficienty in disscolving certain chemicals like calcium oxalate, Ca-phosphate, Ca-carbonate, uric acid, etc., but certain UTI or presence of foreign body may facilitate stone formation. ...Read more

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I have urolithiasis. What are the food and drugs that I should avoid?

Depends on kind: The stone kind makes a difference. However, as a rule of thumb you need more fluid intake especially lemonade/ limeade. Avoid calcium supplements and heavy dairy products and heavy animal protein. ...Read more

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My xray highlights a discrete left renal pelvicalyceal ectasia not associated with urolithiasis?

My xray highlights a discrete left renal pelvicalyceal ectasia not associated with urolithiasis?

Likely insignificant: Depends on degree of pelvi-calyceal ectasia. No problem if mild or moderate, but might require further investigation if this is in fact moderate or severe hydronephrosis (swelling containing urine). Some radiologists use these terms interchangeably. ...Read more

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What is the pathophysiology of the ivh?

See attached: Http://en. Wikipedia. Org/wiki/intraventricular_hemorrhage.

Get a more detailed answer ›
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What is the pathophysiology of syncope?

What is the pathophysiology of syncope?

Decr brain bloodflow: Syncope (loss of consciousness) is caused by reduced blood flow to the brain. Most cases are cardiogenic in nature (for example, arrhythmias), but other causes can include vasovagal response, carotid artery compression, vertebrobasilar system disease, etc. See your primary care provider for further discussion if you've experienced syncope. Http://www. Ninds. Nih. Gov/disorders/syncope/syncope. Htm ...Read more

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What is omphalitis versus pathophysiology?

What is omphalitis versus pathophysiology?

Very different: Omphalitis is an infection/inflammation of the umbilicus (belly button). Pathophysiology is a term that describes the specifics of a disease process. ...Read more

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What's the pathophysiology for cardiomyopathy?

What's the pathophysiology for cardiomyopathy?

Too general for this: Cardiomyopathy is a term for abnormal heart muscle can be a cardiomyopathy that's from a heart attack and damaged muscle. Alcohol, poorly controlled high BP over long time priods. It can be genetic, post partum after having a baby, a virus, etc. Cardiomyopathy can mean a thin weak muscle or a stiff thick muscle. The former is systolic dysfunction. And the latter diastolic dysfxn. Need to narrow it. ...Read more

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Chronic glomerulonephritis pathophysiology?

Chronic glomerulonephritis pathophysiology?

Complex: Reduction in nephron mass from an injury reduces the gfr. This reduction causes hypertrophy & hyperfiltration of the remaining nephrons & to intraglomerular hypertension. These changes occur to increase the GFR of the remaining nephrons, thus minimizing the functional consequences of nephron loss. The changes are ultimately detrimental because they lead to glomerulosclerosis & further nephron loss. ...Read more

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What is the pathophysiology of hypoglycemia?

What is the pathophysiology of hypoglycemia?

High insulin: Very common cause of hypoglycemia is high Insulin levels (almost always related to excess sugar and carb intake). Initially the high Insulin causes a reactive hypoglycemia, however over time, the chronically high Insulin levels lead to "insulin resistance". When your Insulin no longer works your blood sugars will rise and you develop diabetes. This is 100% preventable wi proper diet. ...Read more

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What exactly is pathophysiology of endometritis?

What exactly is pathophysiology of endometritis?

Endometritis: Inflammation, most often due to infection. There is no one pathway by which all endometritis develops. Instrumentation of the uterus is a main risk factor. ...Read more

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What is the pathophysiology of Aspergers syndrome?

What is the pathophysiology of Aspergers syndrome?

Complex: Asperger syndrome, is thought to represent alterations in brain development resulting from interactions between multiple genes and the environment. Problems in the connections between the amygdala and associated structures of the brain may play a role in the pathogenesis. People with Aspergers have difficulty with memory, facial recognition. ...Read more

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Can you explain to me the pathophysiology of myocarditis?

Can you explain to me the pathophysiology of myocarditis?

Myocarditis: Myocarditis can have a variety of causes, but one of the most common is a viral cause. The body responds to the presence of the virus by producing antibodies and an inflammatory response which attack the heart muscle producing disease and damage. Some heart muscle injury is reversible, some is not and stays the same, and some injury may continue to worsen over time. ...Read more

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What are the pathophysiology of anaemia of chronic diseases?

What are the pathophysiology of anaemia of chronic diseases?

Anemia: Really need provide more info concerning age, other conditions- diabetes, heart disease, . The. Most common I encounter are patients with chronic kidney disease. As kidney function decreases, signals to none marrow to produce blood decreased. Kidneys also controll blood pressues, etc. Generally, the body adapts to this type of anemia, treatment only when treatment needed. Other diseases. Space limi. ...Read more

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What is the different pathophysiology between motile and non-motile pathogens?

Motile pathogens: I would look this up in your textbook. Or go to wikipedia. Or we can chat and I can better explain in detail. ...Read more

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Hi doctors, can you tell me what is omphalitis and what is its pathophysiology?

Hi doctors, can you tell me what is omphalitis and what is its pathophysiology?

Cord infection: THis is when the umbilical cord of a baby gets infected. The infection can spread along the connections under the umbilical cord. There are two arteries and a vein. The vein can carry the bacteria up the vein and potentially cause long term problems. ...Read more

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Describe the pathophysiology of growing too tall?

Describe the pathophysiology of growing too tall?

See below: Gigantism is abnormally large growth due to an excess of growth hormone during childhood, before the bone growth plates have closed.
The most common cause of too much growth hormone release is a noncancerous (benign) tumor of the pituitary gland. Other causes include:

•carney complex
•mccune-albright syndrome (mas)
•multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (men-1)
neurofibromatosis. ...Read more

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I need to know what is tonsillopharyngitis and its pathophysiology?

Do your homework: This site is not a shortcut for you to have your nursing school or health class assignments answered. If you plan to pursue these interests you need to review the course materials and answer in the phraseology and terms common to those sources. Otherwise the instructors will know you did not, and will treat your answers accordingly. ...Read more

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What is the pathophysiology diagram of community acquired pneumonia?

What is the pathophysiology diagram of community acquired pneumonia?

CAP: You may be confusing "pathophysiology" with the defining features of cap. This is pneumonia in a person who has not been in contact with medical facilities in contrast to pneumonias which occur in hospital, nursing homes, etc. They generally occur by aspiration of microorganisms from the mouth or nasopharynx into the lung, often in people with prior viral illnesses or other predisposing factors. ...Read more

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Can you tell me the pathophysiology of stevensons syndrome, how it affects the body?

Can you tell me the pathophysiology of stevensons syndrome, how it affects the body?

Stevens Johnson Syn: Stevens Johnson syndrome is a medical emergency which causes lesions on skin and mucous membranes. It can be caused by medications or infection. ...Read more

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Pathophysiology of tonsillitis?

Pathophysiology of tonsillitis?

Infection: Tonsillitis refers to inflamation of the tonsils caused by a virus or bacteria. Serious infections are often caused by bacteria such as streptococcus pharyngitis. Pathophysiology is similar in concept to most other infections. ...Read more

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What is the pathophysiology of chest pain?

What is the pathophysiology of chest pain?

Depends on the cause: Chest pain can be a symptom of heart disease but may be may other things such as esophageal spasms, great vessel disease, respiratory disorders (asthma, COPD, bronchitis, infections), and muscle problems to name a few. It really depends on the clinical situation and other symptoms you may be having. ...Read more

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What is the pathophysiology of hypotension?

What is the pathophysiology of hypotension?

Many: Hypotension or low blood pressure can happen for a variety of reasons. Acute illness (i.e. Sepsis), adrenal gland insufficiency, overmedication, heart failure are just a few of the many reasons for low blood pressure. Additional causes can be volume depletion (orthostasis), or a variety of neurocardiogenic causes such as pots or similar. ...Read more

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Do you know the pathophysiology of microcephaly?

Do you know the pathophysiology of microcephaly?

Varied: There are literally hundreds of things that can cause this including various syndromes, prenatal infections and lack of oxygen during birth just to name a few of the more common causes. ...Read more

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What's the pathophysiology of acute cholecystitis?

What's the pathophysiology of acute cholecystitis?

Inflammation: Acute cholecystitis would suggest blockage of the opening of the gallbladder due to gallstones. Acute indicates sudden onset, may need urgent medical treatment for pain, inflammation or infection. Surgery may be needed on an urgent basis. ...Read more