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Doctor insights on: Pathophysiology Of Uremia

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Pathophysiology of pyelonephritis?

Pathophysiology of pyelonephritis?

Kidney Infection: Pyelonephritis is iinfection in a kidney. It can be caused either by bacteria moving from the skin up the urinary tract and invading the kidney or by bacteria floating around in your blood until they take up residence in your kidney. Either has been given as an explanation for kidney infections and I have not seen anything to say one is more likely than the other. ...Read more

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What is the pathophysiology of hepatic encephalopathy?

What is the pathophysiology of hepatic encephalopathy?

Toxins in bloodstrea: Bacteria in the colon release toxins as part of their normal digestion of nutrients. Typically a normal functioning liver can handle that. When someone has cirrhosis and the liver doesn't work normally those toxins can build up and get into the brain to cause the sleepiness/confusion of hepatic encephalopathy. That is why we use drugs like lactulose for diarrhea to clear the colon. ...Read more

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What's the pathophysiology of lactic acidosis in von gierki's disease?

What's the pathophysiology of lactic acidosis in von gierki's disease?

See below: La arises from impairment of gluconeogenesis. Lactic acid is generated both in the liver and muscle and is oxidized to pyruvic acid and then converted via the gluconeogenenic pathway to g6p. Accumulation of g6p inhibits conversion of lactate to pyruvate. The Lactic Acid level rises during fasting as glucose falls. In people with gsd i, it may not fall entirely to normal even when gluc levels r nml. ...Read more

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What is the pathophysiology of chronic kidney disease?

What is the pathophysiology of chronic kidney disease?

Multiple reasons: Genetics Congenital disorders with altered kidney size, shape, function Medications auto immune disorders Diabetes These are common causes of alterations in kidney function that work by either harming the structure, blood flow or function of the kidney ...Read more

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What is the pathophysiology of congestive heart failure?

What is the pathophysiology of congestive heart failure?

Muscle or Vascular: It is ischemic or non-ischemic cardiomyopathy. It is either a vascular problem or a muscle problem. ...Read more

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What are the pathophysiology of anaemia of chronic diseases?

What are the pathophysiology of anaemia of chronic diseases?

Anemia: Really need provide more info concerning age, other conditions- diabetes, heart disease, . The. Most common i encounter are patients with chronic kidney disease. As kidney function decreases, signals to none marrow to produce blood decreased. Kidneys also controll blood pressues, etc. Generally, the body adapts to this type of anemia, treatment only when treatment needed. Other diseases. Space limi. ...Read more

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Please explain the mechanism of disease of congestive heart failure?

Please explain the mechanism of disease of congestive heart failure?

Heart Failure: CHF is a condition where the left heart function is weakened to the point where blood is not pumped quickly enough and backs up in your lungs as it exits the right side of your heart. The increase in pressure, along with leaky blood vessels in your lungs, causes the non cellular fluid in blood to spill into your alveoli, or air sacks in your lungs. So air exchange and breathing become difficult. ...Read more

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What is the pathophysiology of rheumatic heart disease?

What is the pathophysiology of rheumatic heart disease?

Autoantibodies: Rheumatic heart disease is one of the complications of an untreated strep infection.A month or more after the infection, the body has made antibodies that mistale the tissue of the heart for the germ they were designed to fight.Over time thease antibodies cause inflamation of the heart and can injure the valves. After the acute phase is past, you have a weaker heart with leaky valves and murmurs. ...Read more

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What is the pathophysiology of hypertensive cardiovascular disease?

What is the pathophysiology of hypertensive cardiovascular disease?

Huge!: Can affect head, heart, peripheral blood vessels with consistent or episodic high blood pressure. Many do not know! you can only tell by checking! and must control. ...Read more

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What is the physiology and pathophysiology of rheumatic fever?

What is the physiology and pathophysiology of rheumatic fever?

Rheumatic fever: Rheumatic fever is caused by a streptococcal infection triggering a specific immune response. Acutely various joint aches and pains occur accounting for the 'rheumatic' term. Long term the mitral and/or aortic valves are often involved with chronic inflammation and damaged. We see rf rarely in the us now, but sometimes in new immigrants. ...Read more

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What's the pathophysiology of acute cholecystitis?

What's the pathophysiology of acute cholecystitis?

Inflammation: Acute cholecystitis would suggest blockage of the opening of the gallbladder due to gallstones. Acute indicates sudden onset, may need urgent medical treatment for pain, inflammation or infection. Surgery may be needed on an urgent basis. ...Read more

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What type of cancer usually causes sepsis?

What type of cancer usually causes sepsis?

Not Cancer-Specific: Sepsis occurs when an infection enters the bloodstream, affecting many vital organs. The origin of the infection may be due to any number of different infections, ie pneumonia, utis, diverticulitis, etc. Cancer and its treatment may predispose people to develop these serious infections, but does not directly cause them. ...Read more

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What is the pathophysiology of diabetes mellitus usually?

What is the pathophysiology of diabetes mellitus usually?

Poor sugar control: Most of the foods you consume is metabolized/changed into sugar (glucose) for body to use (similar to oil refining to gas u use for cars), but the sugar level is nicely regulated to about 60-100 in fasting state. When body can't keep it to this range and it is constantly/mostly high above 125 fasting, it is defined as diabetes. There are other ways to diagnosis diabetes. Consult doc. Good luck. ...Read more

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Patho physiology of heart failure in anemi?

Patho physiology of heart failure in anemi?

--: Anemia means low oxygen carrying agents in the blood and this is then compounded with the heart effort to maintain the oxygen delivery to other organs especially the brain by increasing its cardiac output -- and in the presence of a weak heart or other stress factor such as trauma or infection, the heart is overwhelmed and congestive heart failure ensues. ...Read more

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What type of anemia is associated withportal hypertension?

What type of anemia is associated withportal hypertension?

Hypersplenism: Portal Hypertension causes backup of blood in splenic area & this tends to cause hypersplenism where platelets & blood cells are sequestered. Portal hyper-tension also inhibits ability of liver to make clotting factors which may lead to increased Gastrointestinal bleeding. Portal Hypertension is sometimes associated with B12 & Folate (folic acid) deficiency. Medications used to treat may cause IV Hemolysis. ...Read more

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What is the biochemical mechanism of lactic acidosis in diabetes?

What is the biochemical mechanism of lactic acidosis in diabetes?

Lactic acidosis: Please go online to "www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/" and look up lactic acidosis and diabetes. It won't be easy reading but worth a look. You can also go to PubMed and search for lactic acidosis and diabetes. Take your time learning about this. ...Read more

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What is metabolic acidosis in chronic renal failure from?

What is metabolic acidosis in chronic renal failure from?

Unable to remove: Metabolic acidosis is a constituent of renal failure, arising mainly from the inability of kidney to remove excess acids in blood. ...Read more

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What are the causes of non-cardiogenic paulminary edema?

What are the causes of non-cardiogenic paulminary edema?

Non cardinogenic ede: Multiple causes; sepsis syndrome, drugs, brain trauma, lung trauma, infections such as influenza, or others. Volume overload to name a few. Many other causes possible ...Read more

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