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Doctor insights on: Pathophysiology Of Pertussis

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Pathophysiology of tonsillitis?

Pathophysiology of tonsillitis?

Infection: Tonsillitis refers to inflamation of the tonsils caused by a virus or bacteria. Serious infections are often caused by bacteria such as streptococcus pharyngitis. Pathophysiology is similar in concept to most other infections. ...Read more

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What is the pathophysiology diagram of community acquired pneumonia?

What is the pathophysiology diagram of community acquired pneumonia?

CAP: You may be confusing "pathophysiology" with the defining features of cap. This is pneumonia in a person who has not been in contact with medical facilities in contrast to pneumonias which occur in hospital, nursing homes, etc. They generally occur by aspiration of microorganisms from the mouth or nasopharynx into the lung, often in people with prior viral illnesses or other predisposing factors. ...Read more

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Describe the pathophysiology of adult respiratory distress syndrome?

Describe the pathophysiology of adult respiratory distress syndrome?

Prematurity: Leads to immature lunga with inadequate surfactant, a detergent that helps keep alveoli open. High o2 concentrations can cause retrolentil fibroplasoia leading to blindness. ...Read more

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What is the vector of pertussis (whooping cough)?

What is the vector of pertussis (whooping cough)?

Humans: Bordetella pertussis is strictly a human pathogen. ...Read more

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What are the initial symptoms of whooping cough (pertussis)?

What are the initial symptoms of whooping cough (pertussis)?

Pertussis: is divided into three stages: catarrhal, paroxysmal and convalescent. The 1st stage is characterized by common cold symptoms for 1-2 weeks. The 2nd stage is marked by the characteristic cough, and the 3rd by gradual resolution over 2-3 weeks. ...Read more

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Pathophysiology of pyelonephritis?

Pathophysiology of pyelonephritis?

Kidney Infection: Pyelonephritis is iinfection in a kidney. It can be caused either by bacteria moving from the skin up the urinary tract and invading the kidney or by bacteria floating around in your blood until they take up residence in your kidney. Either has been given as an explanation for kidney infections and I have not seen anything to say one is more likely than the other. ...Read more

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Describe the features of bacterial meningitis.?

Describe the features of bacterial meningitis.?

Fever & headache: Bacterial meningitis is a dangerous, often life-threatening disease.It is an infection of the covering of the brain. Most have fever, malaise, headache, and pain when bending chin down to chest. Some patients have purple, blotchy rashes. If you susepct meninigits, go quickly to your closest emergency room. Fortunaely, some types are preventable with vaccines. ...Read more

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What describes the pathophysiology of adult respiratory distress syndrome?

What describes the pathophysiology of adult respiratory distress syndrome?

Death of...: ...Cells that produce surfactant in the lungs. Surfactant keeps the alveolar walls from sticking together, and so keeps lungs open for breathing. Once these cells die, alveoli collapse. ...Read more

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What is the pathophysiology of mycobacterium tuberculosis?

What is the pathophysiology of mycobacterium tuberculosis?

Complex: Mtb is acquired thru respiratory route and replicates in the lung before asymptomatically disseminates to other organs. After about 6-8 weeks, the immune system starts to respond to the bug, walling the bacilli off in granulomas. Other than a positive skin test, 90% of people stay well. Of the rest, half will "reactivate" within 2 yrs and the others later sometimes due to immune suppression. ...Read more

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What is the physiology and pathophysiology of rheumatic fever?

What is the physiology and pathophysiology of rheumatic fever?

Rheumatic fever: Rheumatic fever is caused by a streptococcal infection triggering a specific immune response. Acutely various joint aches and pains occur accounting for the 'rheumatic' term. Long term the mitral and/or aortic valves are often involved with chronic inflammation and damaged. We see rf rarely in the us now, but sometimes in new immigrants. ...Read more

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What are the causes of pneumonia?Treatment of pneumonia?

What are the causes of pneumonia?Treatment of pneumonia?

Infection/antibiotic: Pneumonia is an infection of the lungs, which can be caused by bacteria, viruses, or fungi. Somethings which predispose to pneumonia include impaired cough ( which may happen after surgery or after something like a stroke, weakened immune system, which may be seen with things like cancer chemo, or chronic lung disease. Treatment is antibiotics, support like supplemental oxygen if needed and time. ...Read more

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What group of influenza viruses has caused the pandemics?

What group of influenza viruses has caused the pandemics?

Influenza A viruses: 1918 - Spanish Flu pandemic was a classic example. ...Read more

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What exactly is the pathophysiology of bacterial meningitis?

What exactly is  the pathophysiology of bacterial meningitis?

Invasionand Response: Bacterial meningitis usually begins with nasopharyngeal colonization by an organism, followed by invasion and bacteremia. The generation of an intense subarachnoid space inflammatory response, induced by release of bacterial virulence factors and/or inflammatory cytokines on sequences of bacterial meningitis, including cerebral edema, increased intracranial pressure, and alterations of blood flow. ...Read more

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What type of microbe causes meningitis?

What type of microbe causes meningitis?

Causes of meningitis: The agents causing meningitis are bacteria such as meningococcus viruses such as herpes virus fungi = such as crypptococcus spirochetes. ...Read more

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What is the pathophysiology of rheumatic heart disease?

What is the pathophysiology of rheumatic heart disease?

Autoantibodies: Rheumatic heart disease is one of the complications of an untreated strep infection.A month or more after the infection, the body has made antibodies that mistale the tissue of the heart for the germ they were designed to fight.Over time thease antibodies cause inflamation of the heart and can injure the valves. After the acute phase is past, you have a weaker heart with leaky valves and murmurs. ...Read more

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What are the effects of swine fever or pneumonic plague ?

What are the effects of swine fever or pneumonic plague ?

Swine fever?: I guess you are talking about the epidemic variant H1N1 influenza from several years ago. The mortality rate of pneumonic plague is usually over 50% and can be almost 100% if untreated. The mortality rate from that epidemic influenza was probably way under 1%. ...Read more

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What is pathophysiology of typhoid fever?

What is pathophysiology of typhoid fever?

Typhoid fever ehow!: in a nutshell: bug in human feces (typhoid Mary) -- evades gut with less acid, taken up by M cells in the small gut.. causes diarrhea at times bloody (dysentery) and if bad --a hole in the bowel (needs surgery). Can go to lymphatics then blood stream, then macrophages (cells that chew bacteria) in liver/spleen/bone marrow -- back in blood/sepsis and quite ill or gallbladder (cholecysitis/carrier). ...Read more

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The minactra meningitis vaccine covers all types of bacterial meningitis?

The minactra meningitis vaccine covers all types of bacterial meningitis?

No: This vaccine is only helpful in preventing 4 strains of the meningococcus bacteria contained within the vaccine.These are the more common strains that cause this type of meningitis, but there are other strains. It does not cover any of the several other germs known to cause meningitis. Other vaccines cover some of the other germs. ...Read more

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What's the pathogenesis of dengue?

What's the pathogenesis of dengue?

Viral infection: Dengue is a mosquito borne virus infection. For more information consult this site. http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/dengue-fever/. ...Read more

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Where did pertussis come from ?

Where did pertussis come from
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Whooping cough: Pertussis is a highly contagious respiratory disease caused by a bacteria called bordetella pertussis. It causes heavy, uncontrollable coughing that sound like barking. It is on the rise, therefore immunization against it is now recommended. Most of us have been immunized against it during our early years of life through the tdap tetanus vaccine and now booster is recommended for unimmunized. ...Read more

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What are the symptoms pertussis?

What are the symptoms pertussis?

Cough: It usually starts with a runny nose and congestion and then it's becomes a long, persistent, annoying cough for adults. In kids or infants it will often come with coughing fits that result in a whoop of inspiration after the coughing fit or sometimes after cough vomiting. Hence the name whooping cough. ...Read more

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Can I die from pertussis if I ignore it?

Can I die from pertussis if I ignore it?

Not likely: Pertussis can cause death in children, especially if the child is malnourished, has other respiratory illness or other intercurrent illness. An adult is not likely to die from it. ...Read more

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Any support groups for pertussis?

Any support groups for pertussis?

Why?: You don't usually need a support group for an acute infection that you recover from. Support groups are for people with chronic infections. And if everyone got vaccinated, there would be no pertussis. ...Read more

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How can I avoid pertussis in infant?

How can I avoid pertussis in infant?

Vaccinate: You vaccinate the mother during pregnancy or soon thereafter, as well as any adult in routine contact.You also vaccinate the kid as soon as they are old enough. ...Read more

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Do people with pertussis have a lot of pain?

Can't say: Patients struggling with the worst cases of whooping cough are generally under a year of age and cough so hard they get strokes & brain damage. They are not conversational at that point but i'm sure it's not pleasent. Older kids or adults don't have it so bad, but the "100 days cough" surely wears them out. It is described as a moderate bronchitis in that group. ...Read more

Dr. Jay Park Dr. Park
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What are the symptoms of pertussis in a toddler?

Dr. Jay Park Dr. Park
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What are the symptoms of pertussis in a toddler?

See below: Pertussis begins with mild respiratory symptoms similar to common cold (catarrhal stage), followed by paroxysmal stage characterized by paroxysmal cough and whoop often followed by vomiting. This stage often lasts 6 to 8 weeks. Severe cough spell and apnea (cessation of breathing) especially in young children can result in rectal prolapse, subconjunctival hemorrhage, and seizure. ...Read more

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Has anyone experienced an outbreak of pertussis locally?

Has anyone experienced an outbreak of pertussis locally?

Yes: Yes, in my area we are in the midst of a serious outbreak, mostly in school age kids and adults. Rarely have infants been diagnosed currently. The mix includes underimmunized patients needing booster updates, not immunized at all and occasionally immunized patients where the vaccine apparently did not "take". ...Read more

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What is the difference between pertussis and the common cold?

What is the difference between pertussis and the common cold?

Pertussis vs URI: Although the initial symptoms of a common cold and pertussis are very similar, their causes are not. Pertussis is caused by a bacterial infection, has three distinct stages, is dangerous in young children, lasts up to weeks and can be prevented with vaccination. Common colds are viral in nature, usually not dangerous, do not respond to antibiotics, and resolve on their own in a few days. ...Read more

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How often can I need a DPT shot to remain immune to pertussis?

How often can I need a DPT shot to remain immune to pertussis?

Tdap at11yrsThen10yr: These days all children who have had 5 doses of DPT Vaccine up to the age4to6.Are advised to get a Tdap Adult vaccine at age 11 and a booster after 10 years,So far only one booster of Tdap is recommended and then DT every 10 years to protect against Diptheria and Teatanus So if you have not had Tdap booster.You should get it as immunity to Pertussis goes down and you are at risk of getting Pertuss ...Read more

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I might have pertussis, been coughing a lot; how do I get checked?

I might have pertussis, been coughing a lot; how do I get checked?

Make some calls: The proper testing can be done in many outpatient settings.Your doctor, a local urgent care clinic, a county health center , or emergency room can get a specimen and send it for PCR testing. Results are usually available within a few days. Depending on exposure history, some are treated before the results are known. ...Read more

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What are the signs and symptoms that you might be getting pertussis?

What are the signs and symptoms that you might be getting pertussis?

Whooping cough: That is the common name for pertussis. If vcaccinated it is very unlikely. ...Read more

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Should the grandparents of my children be inoculated against pertussis?

Should the grandparents of my children be inoculated against pertussis?

Yes: The latest research demonstrates that approximately 60- 70% of infants with documented whooping cough or pertussis have been infected by contacts with family members. If the grandparents have not been recently vaccinated with the tdap vaccine, they should receive one asap.Remember that pertussis can be deadly in infants. ...Read more

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How do you know if you've got real pertussis and not just usual bronchitis?

How do you know if you've got real pertussis and not just usual bronchitis?

Whooping cough: Just listening to a child's cough may differentiate pertussis (whooping cough) from bronchitis. Children often get infected by adults and tend to "whoop" more than them. More commonly, they are indistinguishable especially in adults. The whoop is produced by air hunger between prolonged fits of coughing. A PCR test can be performed to diagnose pertussis. ...Read more

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I have pertussis at the moment. Will I need a booster afterwards? I am 58 & usually in good health

I have pertussis at the moment. Will I need a booster afterwards? I am 58 & usually in good health

Depends: You will develop protective antibodies to re-infection by pertussis during your recovery.These would protect you from re-infection for at least 5 years if not more.After that interval, if you were involved in the care of a newborn baby or young infant, it might be reasonable to have a booster.These infants are at risk and by boosting all the adults around them it keeps them safe. ...Read more

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A DPT shot about 9 years ago. If there is an epidemic of pertussis, am i still covered or should I seek another one?

Not Clear: There is not clear evidence for your age, but current recommendation is that you should have received at least 1 pertussis booster in your teen years or later.I believe that a booster would not hurt. ...Read more

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I received a DPT shot about 9 years ago. With the current epidemic of pertussis in ca, willl i be covered or should I seek another one?

Relative need: As an adult your risks with pertussis are minimal except that the infection can produce a nasty bronchitis & chronic cough for 3+ months & you could pass it on to a small infant. Use of the tdap every 10 years is considered enough for prevention. ...Read more

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What happens if you are pregnant and have pertussis?

What happens if you are pregnant and have pertussis?

Take meds/get better: You would likely develop some antibodies that will provide the newborn with some additional protection in the weeks after birth.Pertussis for adults is more an inconvenience than a threat. The fetus would not be affected by the illness or the meds taken to treat it. It would give the mom the "100 days" cough. ...Read more