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Doctor insights on: Pathophysiology Of Addisonian Crisis

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What sort of problem is an addisonian crisis (acute adrenal crisis)?

What sort of problem is an addisonian crisis (acute adrenal crisis)?

Emergency: Adrenal crisis occurs when there is abrupt loss of adrenal hormones or treatment of addison's disease is suddenly stopped. Symptoms include low blood pressure leading to shock, confusion leading to loss of consciousness, low blood sugar, electrolyte imbalance leading to instability of the heart rhythm, and can result in death. Treatment is required urgently. ...Read more

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Dr. Pamela Pappas
147 doctors shared insights

Addisonian Crisis (Definition)

Addisonian or acute adrenal crisis is a life-threatening condition that occurs when there is not enough cortisol, a hormone produced by the adrenal glands. It can manifest with fatigue, nausea, poor appetite, fever, joint pain, fatigue, coma, or seizure. Addison's disease is usually treated ...Read more


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What is acute adrenal crisis?

What is acute adrenal crisis?

Low cortisol state: Acute adrenal crisis is defined by the sudden drop in Hydrocortisone (or its equivalent) in the body, prompting acute physiological changes such as low blood sugar, lethargy, nausea, low blood pressure and sometimes even coma and death. Immediate steroid replacement is needed to reverse the above either via mouth (if the individual is stable and able to swallow) or via intra muscular/intravenous. ...Read more

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What are early signs of acute adrenal crisis?

See below: Patients with acute adrenal crisis may have weak and rapid pulse, cold skin, low blood pressure, fast and labored breathing, and can turn dusky or blue. Without immediate and intensive treatment, this condition can be fatal. ...Read more

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Symptoms of lupus crisis?

Symptoms of lupus crisis?

It depends: The symptoms of a lupus flare depend on the exact organ systems involved and the extent of the involvement. ...Read more

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What's the pathophysiology of lactic acidosis in von gierki's disease?

What's the pathophysiology of lactic acidosis in von gierki's disease?

See below: La arises from impairment of gluconeogenesis. Lactic acid is generated both in the liver and muscle and is oxidized to pyruvic acid and then converted via the gluconeogenenic pathway to g6p. Accumulation of g6p inhibits conversion of lactate to pyruvate. The Lactic Acid level rises during fasting as glucose falls. In people with gsd i, it may not fall entirely to normal even when gluc levels r nml. ...Read more

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What are symptoms of sickle cell anemia crisis?

What are symptoms of sickle cell anemia crisis?

Pain.: When red cells sickle, they become rigid and block the flow of blood. If this happens in muscle or bone, the result is pain. In the lung it's pain and shortness of breath. In the brain, it can cause a stroke. Any organ can be effected. A painful crisis happens when blood flow is interrupted. They are episodic and unpredictable. ...Read more

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What is the death rate of addison's disease?

Hard to say: Deaths directly due to adrenal insufficiency (ai) are extremely rare, but having ai complicates other conditions and can increase their death rates. Example: if two people sustain identical injuries in an auto crash, and one has ai, they might be more more likely to die from those injuries than the person without ai. Same thing holds for people with serious infections or being treated for cancer. ...Read more

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What are the symptoms of hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic syndrome?

What are the symptoms of hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic syndrome?

Many: The most obvious sign of a hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state is an alteration in mental status or functioning. People may become lethargic or drowsy, confused, or even delirious. In severe cases a person may become unresponsive. Occasionally they can have seizures, visual problems, and movement or sensory problems. This is a dangerous condition that need immediate medical attention. ...Read more

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What is the pathophysiology of hypertensive cardiovascular disease?

What is the pathophysiology of hypertensive cardiovascular disease?

Huge!: Can affect head, heart, peripheral blood vessels with consistent or episodic high blood pressure. Many do not know! you can only tell by checking! and must control. ...Read more

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What are the pathophysiology of anaemia of chronic diseases?

What are the pathophysiology of anaemia of chronic diseases?

Anemia: Really need provide more info concerning age, other conditions- diabetes, heart disease, . The. Most common i encounter are patients with chronic kidney disease. As kidney function decreases, signals to none marrow to produce blood decreased. Kidneys also controll blood pressues, etc. Generally, the body adapts to this type of anemia, treatment only when treatment needed. Other diseases. Space limi. ...Read more

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Pathophysiology of pyelonephritis?

Pathophysiology of pyelonephritis?

Kidney Infection: Pyelonephritis is iinfection in a kidney. It can be caused either by bacteria moving from the skin up the urinary tract and invading the kidney or by bacteria floating around in your blood until they take up residence in your kidney. Either has been given as an explanation for kidney infections and I have not seen anything to say one is more likely than the other. ...Read more

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What causes Hyperkalemia in Addison's disease?

What causes Hyperkalemia in Addison's disease?

Distal tubule: In the absence of aldosterone and its like from the adrenal cortex, the proximal tubule has some mechanisms that ordinarily waste sodium and hang onto potassium. This will get you started. ...Read more

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Why signs of splenomegaly and cardiomegaly in cases of sickle cell disease?

Why signs of splenomegaly and cardiomegaly in cases of sickle cell disease?

Sickled RBC's: The spleen not only helps in processing antigens to help wbc's fight infection, it also acts as a "stress test" for rbc's, weeding out the weaker and older ones for recycling. As rbc's "sickle", they cause clumps in the vessels, this is what causes the pain in the joints/chest and also what causes the spleen to swell. If happens in the coronary arteries, can weaken the heart and enlarge it. ...Read more

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Can sickle cell crisis cause lost of pregnancy?

Can sickle cell crisis cause lost of pregnancy?

Yes: Women with sickle cell disease who become pregnant are at higher risk for complications such as miscarriage, premature birth, and low birth weight. Sickle cell disease symptoms often worsen during pregnancy and pain crises become more frequent. However, with careful prenatal care and monitoring, serious problems can be avoided. ...Read more

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Describe the pathophysiology of adult respiratory distress syndrome?

Describe the pathophysiology of adult respiratory distress syndrome?

Prematurity: Leads to immature lunga with inadequate surfactant, a detergent that helps keep alveoli open. High o2 concentrations can cause retrolentil fibroplasoia leading to blindness. ...Read more

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Is pots syndrome and neurocardiogenic syncope an early indication of multiple system atrophy or Parkinson's disease ?

Is pots syndrome and neurocardiogenic syncope an early indication of multiple system atrophy or Parkinson's disease ?

Possible: Pots/ neurocardiogenic syncope is mostly idiopathic but can be a presentation of a systemic disease that is related to the nervous system and the cardiovascular system. ...Read more

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Idiopathic autoimmune hemolytic anemia - what are the chances of dying?

Idiopathic autoimmune hemolytic anemia - what are the chances of dying?

Uncommon. : This would be very uncommon. But it can happen. Definitely take the prescribed medicine and follow up with your doctor regularly. ...Read more

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What describes the pathophysiology of adult respiratory distress syndrome?

What describes the pathophysiology of adult respiratory distress syndrome?

Death of...: ...Cells that produce surfactant in the lungs. Surfactant keeps the alveolar walls from sticking together, and so keeps lungs open for breathing. Once these cells die, alveoli collapse. ...Read more

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Please explain the mechanism of disease of congestive heart failure?

Please explain the mechanism of disease of congestive heart failure?

Heart Failure: CHF is a condition where the left heart function is weakened to the point where blood is not pumped quickly enough and backs up in your lungs as it exits the right side of your heart. The increase in pressure, along with leaky blood vessels in your lungs, causes the non cellular fluid in blood to spill into your alveoli, or air sacks in your lungs. So air exchange and breathing become difficult. ...Read more

Dr. Cayce Jehaimi
400 doctors shared insights

Adrenal Insufficiency (Definition)

Adrenal insufficiency is either an absent or abnormally low production and/or secretion of hormones produced by the adrenal gland. Hormones produced by the adrenal glands include those involved with salt regulation, sugar metabolism, and sex hormones ...Read more