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Doctor insights on: Parkinson Desise

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Is AZILECT (rasagiline) helpful after DBS for Parkinsons?

Is AZILECT (rasagiline) helpful after DBS for Parkinsons?

DBS and medications: DBS is not a replacement for medication and vice versa. Many DBS patients are place on Azilect (rasagiline) before and some after surgery. This drug can block the destruction of Dopamine in the brain. These allows more Dopamine to be available for action. This may induce dyskinesias in some patients but DBS to the GPI can help that side effect ...Read more

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Does Azilect (rasagiline) help to improve speech in Parkinson’s patients?

In theory, it should: Theoretically, Azilect (rasagiline) (an MAO-B inhibitor) should help with many of the symptoms of Parkinson's for a certain period of time. However, as with all treatments for this disease, they are notoriously unpredictable. I've attached an article which I hope might help. Good luck! http://www.reprintsdesk.com/landing/hf.aspx?h=523154&hr=716110317&a=1&u=0&r=826399194 ...Read more

Dr. John Oro Dr. Oro
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What is ALS ( lou gehrigs disease )?

Dr. John Oro Dr. Oro
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What is ALS ( lou gehrigs disease )?

Paralysis of muscles: Lou gehrig's disease is also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The disease attacks nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord that run the muscles that we can normally control. The cause of the disease is not known. In about 10% it is genetic. People with lou gehrig's disease slowly become weak in the arms and legs, and can have difficulty speaking, swallowing, and breathing. ...Read more

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Gait freezingafter deep brain stimulation surgery for Parkinson's disease any suggestions?

Gait freezingafter deep brain stimulation surgery for Parkinson's disease any suggestions?

Complex Issue: Gait is a very complex neurological function that relies on many systems functioning together. I would recommend that you see a specialist in dbs programming to help you maximize function. ...Read more

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What is the protocol for switching a Parkinson’s patient from regular Sinemet (carbidopa and levodopa) to Sinemet (carbidopa and levodopa) CR?

What is the protocol for switching a Parkinson’s patient from regular Sinemet (carbidopa and levodopa) to Sinemet (carbidopa and levodopa) CR?

Slow increase: Sinemet (carbidopa and levodopa) CR is a 2x/day treatment vs Sinemet (carbidopa and levodopa) at 4x/day, so to get to twice the daily dose you need to increase dosing slowly over several days, up to a week. I suggest you talk to your doctor, who can nap out a plan to do this safely ...Read more

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What percentage of Parkinson's disease patients are good candidates for deep brain stimulation (DBS)?

What percentage of Parkinson's disease patients are good candidates for deep brain stimulation (DBS)?

Parkinson Diseases: DBS is typically reserved for patients with end stage type disease that failing medications. It is not a first line type of therapy. ...Read more

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How often parkinson medicine is reduced after DBS surgery?

Often: Many people find relief of motor symptoms and although most still need medication, many can reduce it. http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/deep_brain_stimulation/deep_brain_stimulation.htm ...Read more

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What works better for Parkinson's disease: levodopa or anticholinergic?

What works better for Parkinson's disease: levodopa or anticholinergic?

Answer: Clearly the anticholinergics are archaic, and have substantial tolerance issues. The main neurotransmitter issue involves dopamine, so L-Dopa is the most direct and logical intervention. I never use anticholinergics for my patients these days. ...Read more

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Does brain surgery for Parkinson's disease really work?

Does brain surgery for Parkinson's disease really work?

Yes: In the proper patient, brain surgery for parkinson;s disease does work. One surgery that is done is the implantation of deep brain stimulators. These are electrodes that are placed in the brain and are connected to stimulation units implanted on the chest wall. There are specialized neurosurgery centers that are doing these procedures. Your neurologist should be able to give you some direction. ...Read more

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Parkinson patient for 7 years currently taking sinemet & requip (ropinirole). Only sinemet seems to releive systoms. Is there any risks of stoping requip (ropinirole)?

Parkinson patient for 7 years currently taking sinemet & requip (ropinirole). Only sinemet seems to releive systoms. Is there any risks of stoping requip (ropinirole)?

See neurologist: The Requip (ropinirole) may not be playing much of a role at this point, and could be tapered off over a few days. There really is no substantial withdrawal issue usually, and unlikely to experience any challenges. Discuss with your doctor, and revamp your medications, as dbs will certainly change your med needs. ...Read more

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Can dbs cure the cognitive effects of parkinson's?

No: Dbs only treats the movement components of parkinson's disease. In some cases, it can exacerbate the cognitive components of parkinson's disease. ...Read more

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Does Parkinson disease patient have to take Parkinson medicine?

Depends on yourself: Many factors to assess before deciding whether it's best for a patient to take medication for their Parkinson's right away or wait. That's something you should discuss with your doctor. Medications for Parkinson's have side effects to be sure but they also can improve the quality of life tremendously in some people. You can also engage in regular EXERCISE (not just physical therapy) which helps. ...Read more

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What symptoms of Parkinson's disease does mirapex (pramipexole) help?

What symptoms of Parkinson's disease does mirapex (pramipexole) help?

Motor symptoms: Mirapex (pramipexole) is good for the motor symptoms of parkinson disease. It should help the tremors, rigidity, and to some degree the bradykinesia. Mirapex (pramipexole) also has good data for depression, which is very common in parkinson disease. It will not help symptoms such as dementia, and may aggravate things like hallucinations and hypotension. ...Read more

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Paralyzis and hyperalgesia in one limb initiated 2 weeks after scoliosis surgery. sphincter incont Clonus. Spasticity. upper motor neuron lesion? why?

Paralyzis and hyperalgesia in one limb initiated 2 weeks after scoliosis surgery. sphincter incont Clonus. Spasticity. upper motor neuron lesion? why?

Postop complication: One has to worry about a delayed postoperative complication-significant!!!! Need to see operating surgeon . Potential causes would be hematoma(blood) compressing spinal cord or even a spinal cord lesion remote from operative site ...Read more

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My mom (75 years old but biologically younger) has early parkinson's. Any downside to mao-b inhibitor instead of levodopa if symptoms minimal?

My mom (75 years old but biologically younger) has early parkinson's. Any downside to mao-b inhibitor instead of levodopa if symptoms minimal?

Neurologist can help: A small amount of information is on the internet regarding MAO inhibitors (such as selegiline) and l-dopa to treat parkinson's. Among elderly patients, individuals can react quite differently to various meds & doses, so a person's treatment has to be customized. It appears that using both meds allows one to use a lower dose of l-dopa. The list of selegiline side effects looks milder than l-dopa's. ...Read more

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What is parkinsons?

What is parkinsons?

PD summary: Parkinson disease is a disease where cells in the brain that produce a chemical called Dopamine start to die. We don't know why. When you lose enough (~66%), you start to show the symptoms which include tremors, stiffness, slowness of movement, and balance problems. There can also be "non-motor" symptoms such as constipation, depression, and fatigue. Movement disorder neurologists treat this. ...Read more

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What is parkinsonism ?

What is parkinsonism ?

Parkinsonism: It is a disorder that affects the way the brain co-ordinates the movements of the muscles in various parts of the body. Main symptoms are usually stiffness, shaking (tremor), and slowness of movement. Symptoms typically become gradually worse over time. Treatment often provides good relief of symptoms for several years. http://patient.info/health/parkinsons-disease-leaflet ...Read more

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What are the signs of parkinsons?

What are the signs of parkinsons?

Read below: Physical symptoms can include tremor of limbs at rest>in posture or in action; slow movements & stiff (rigid) muscles causing quiet facial emotions, softer voice, bent forward head & neck posture, decreased arm swing, slow-shuffled walk, small/scratchy penmanship, etc. Non-physical symptoms can include cognitive decline, depression, anxiety, sleepiness, constipation, ed, low bp, acting-out dreams. ...Read more

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What is parkinson's?

What is parkinson's?

Parkinsons: Parkinsons is a condition that affects movement of the muscles. It is caused by loss of cells within part of the brain called the substantia nigra. Common symptoms include muscle rigidity, resting tremor, slowness of movement, and sometimes unexplained falls. Some people may have more of a tremor than others, these symptoms may not affect everyone the same way. ...Read more

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What's Parkinson's desease?

What's Parkinson's desease?

Chronic brain : It is a chronic degenerative disease of the brain that results in loss of fine control of the muscles, loss of the ability to walk and eventually loss of any purposeful movement. ...Read more

Dr. Alan Ali Dr. Ali
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What is Parkinson's disease?

Dr. Alan Ali Dr. Ali
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What is Parkinson's disease?

Parkinson: Rigidity such as stiff neck, tremors, and slow movements are part of parkinson. It involves the part of the midbrain called Substantia nigra. ...Read more

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When does Parkinson's show up?

Young or old: Go to http://www.Pdf.Org/ the mean age of onset is about 65 years. Cases occurring in ages 21 to 40 are considered young-onset pd; those younger than 21 have juvenile parkinsonism. [5] from ages 0 to 29, the average annual incidence rate of parkinsonism is 0.8/100, 000 person-years, and rates increase incrementally to 304.8/100, 000 person-years in those aged 80 to 99 years. [2]. ...Read more

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What causes Parkinson's disease?

Unknown: The cause of parkinson disease is unknown. It appears that the cause of parkinson disease leads to the depletion of Dopamine in the subtantia nigra in the brain that is responsible for the symptoms of the disease. ...Read more

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Can buspirone cause Parkinsons?

Can buspirone cause Parkinsons?

Parkinson's symptoms: Buspirone can cause Parkinson-like symptoms including tremors, muscle weakness, shuffling gait, stooped posture, drooling, etc. Rare neurological effects include abnormal movements, decreased mobility, restlessness, involumtary mouth movements, and motor deficits. See your physician for a full discussion to weigh the risks and benefits. http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/meds/a688005.html ...Read more

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How to diagnose wolf parkinson's?

How to diagnose wolf parkinson's?

WPW: Wolff-parkinson-white syndrome is a heart condition that can be detected with an electrocardiogram. Sometimes further tests called electrophysiologic studies are used to determine the origin of the abnormal rapid heartbeat. ...Read more

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Is parkinson’s disease hereditary?

Yes: Although the causes are multifactorial and sometimes poorly understood, there is a hereditary component. Keep in mind, that even though a parent may have it, it does not mean that it will be necessarily passed on. The tendency, however, may be there. ...Read more

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Is Parkinson's disease hereditary?

Is Parkinson's disease hereditary?

Sometimes: Parkinson disease is the most common cause of parkinsonism, a symptomatic triad of tremor, muscular rigidity, and slow movement. Most of parkinson disease is caused by contributions of multiple genes, no one of which is necessary nor sufficient, aided by poorly defined environmental factors. About seven types of parkinson disease are inherited in an autosomal dominant or recessive pattern. ...Read more

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Is Parkinson's disease hereditary?

Is Parkinson's disease hereditary?

It can be, yes: As a general rule, the younger the age of onset (<45yo is early onset), & the more affected relatives (especially close ones), then the more likely it is genetic & the higher the risk to blood relatives. Average age of pd onset is 58. The older you are @ disease onset, the less likely it is genetically inheritable. Look @ this link for help on genetics: http://www.Ncbi.Nlm.Nih.Gov/books/nbk1223/. ...Read more

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Is Parkinson's disease hereditary?

Is Parkinson's disease hereditary?

A bit: There are some hereditary factors but they are seemingly minor. If you have a first-degree relative with parkinson’s disease you are more likely to get it, but the risk is small (< 5 % according to mayo clinic reports). It can run very strongly in some families in rare situations of abnormalities of alpha-synuclein synthesis or protein disposal problems. ...Read more

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How to prevent from parkinsonism ?

Prevention?: The cause of onset of parkinsons remains a mystery herbicides seem to be a problem caffeine studies have shown both increased and decrease risk some kinds of peppers may decrease risk in the 1980s a chemical with heroin was known to cause parkinsons. ...Read more

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How is Parkinson's disease treated?

How is Parkinson's disease treated?

Good Rx available!!: Dopamine meds are mainstay of treatment. Modern therapy recommends longer lasting, milder potency meds first: Azilect (mao-b selective inhibitor) & Dopamine agonists (requip xl/mirapex er/neupro). After they've been maximized & stronger meds are needed to adequately manage symptoms, then sinemet +/- Comtan (stalevo (carbidopa and levodopa and entacapone) is both together) are begun. Tailor rx with side effects in mind for each person. ...Read more

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Tell me about Parkinson's disease.?

Tell me about Parkinson's disease.?

Neurodegenerative: Parkinson’s results from destruction of dopamine-producing neurons in part of the brain (substantia nigra). A lack of these neurons causes decreased excitation of the motor part of the brain. This results in the classic signs of a resting tremor (“pill-rolling”), slowness of movement (shuffling steps), rigidity (resistance to being moved), and postural instability (balance issues). ...Read more

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What is pseudo Parkinson's disease?

Not Parkinson's: Parkinson's disease is a disorder of the brain characterized by slowness of movement, rigidity of muscles and is caused by a deficiency of Dopamine in the brain. Many drugs such as the anti-psychotics can cause a parkinson's-like picture, as can some severe infections and metabolic disorders. I believe the term is more of a lay term than what is truly found in medical books. ...Read more

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How to diagnose Parkinson's disease?

Diagnose PD: Parkinsons disease is often diagnosed by a history and a clinical exam. The history helps to evaluate if there are any medicines or other factors that can explain the symptoms. The exam should show evidence of muscular rigidity, postural instability or slowness of movement- these are clinical features that are needed to make the diagnosis. Hope that helps! ...Read more

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