Top
20
Doctor insights on: Parietal Occipital

Share
1

1
Sharp pain in temporal parietal lobe?

Sharp pain in temporal parietal lobe?

Impossible: You cannot have a pain in your temporal or parietal lobe. Your brain has no pain nerves. All sensations are processed in the brain but experienced elsewhere in the body. Whatever pain you're feeling, it's not in your brain tissue. ...Read more

2

2
What do you mean by: 1. Scalp hematoma, left parietal region 2, cerebral contusion left parietal lobe 3. Cerebral contusion left base cerebral hemisph?

What do you mean by: 1. Scalp hematoma, left parietal region 2, cerebral contusion left parietal lobe 3. Cerebral contusion left base cerebral hemisph?

Scalp hematoma: Scalp hematoma is a bleeding underneath the scalp in the upper left region of the skull. The contusion is in the same region and is a brusing and bleeding in the brain. #3. Is another bruising or bleeding on the left side of the brain but lower down towards the base of the skull. These injuries sound like there are a result of head trauma. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
5

5
Ct head scan results are frontal lobe sulci bilateral prominent. Prominate subarachnold space. Midline lipoma. Anterior interhemispheric fissure promi?

Ct head scan results are frontal lobe sulci bilateral prominent. Prominate subarachnold space. Midline lipoma. Anterior interhemispheric fissure promi?

Atrophy: The midline lipoma probably doesnt warrant any treatment. These are usually incidental findings, but they can be associated with some congenital brain disorders. You basically seem to have less brain in your skull relative to fluid spaces relative to others. Have your doctor review the scan with you. ...Read more

6

6
Enlarged perivascular space in basal ganglia. Is by any cranial nerves? Double vision, enlarged pupils, trigeminal neuralgia, pulsating tinnitus

Enlarged perivascular space in basal ganglia. Is by any cranial nerves? Double vision, enlarged pupils, trigeminal neuralgia, pulsating tinnitus

Neurologic issues: None of what you describe is normal. I would suggest that you seek the opinion of both the Neurologist and the Neurosurgeon and possibly the Interventional Neuroradiologist. ...Read more

7

7
F,48. Pls detail(1)"nonspec hyperintense FLAIR foci involving L.parietal+bilateral.frontal.lobes" +(2)"signal void along main intracranial vasculature?

F,48. Pls detail(1)"nonspec hyperintense FLAIR foci involving L.parietal+bilateral.frontal.lobes" +(2)"signal void along main intracranial vasculature?

Radiology terms: This is specialized radiology terminology and isn't helpful by itself. The radiologist should provide a conclusion at end of report as to what it all means. This must then be interpreted in context of what symptoms led to study in first place. Too much for any of us to answer in this format. Talk to the doctor who ordered the study. Good luck. ...Read more

9

9
My mother, 84, MRI scan> subacute infarcts, bilateral frontal lobes, small vessel ischematic changes inthe basal ganglia, periventricular white matter?

My mother, 84, MRI scan> subacute infarcts, bilateral frontal lobes, small vessel ischematic changes inthe basal ganglia, periventricular white matter?

Small vessel disease: Mri in a 84 years old lady showing infarcts and small vessel disease means she is having ministrokes. That is very common in that age group. If she has heart disease or carotid artery disease or risk factors like high BP or diabetes or high lipids they should be controlled and she should follow up with her dr who can give her further recommendations. ...Read more

10

10
S+s of end stage primary brain cancer, (aa iii) r medial temporal lobe, diffuse numerous cells. Growing!/brainstem and posterior temp./basal ganglia?

S+s of end stage primary brain cancer, (aa iii) r medial temporal lobe, diffuse numerous cells. Growing!/brainstem and posterior temp./basal ganglia?

Ask for more info: Signs and symptoms can vary greatly with any 'end-stage' cancer. Things like if it has spread to other organs, impacting functional status and alertness (sleeping more, in bed most of the time), causing pain/seizures, and so on. His doctors can maybe determine what is most likely. If not involved already ask for hospice or palliative care help as they could also help answer what the s/s might be. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
12

12
Does temporal lobe epilepsy cause dyscalucia .

Does temporal lobe epilepsy cause dyscalucia .

Coexisting: There may be coexisting problems of Temporal Lobe epilepsy and dyscalculia. Unlikely to be a cause and effect relationship ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
13

13
Radiologist report says bilateral gliosis posterior frontal lobe. Where is the posterior frontal lobe located and can it cause my nocturnal seizures. ?

Radiologist report says bilateral gliosis posterior frontal lobe. Where is the posterior frontal lobe located and can it cause my nocturnal seizures. ?

The frontal lobes: Occupy about the front half of the top part of the brain, called the cerebrum. The posterior area would be towards the back - just in front and above the ear - see attached image - the back part of the pink area. Gliosis is like scar tissue in the brain, and could cause seizures. Please discuss this with your neurologist and correlate with eeg and other test results. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
14

14
Frontal lobe epilepsy like deja vu?

Frontal lobe epilepsy like deja vu?

Distorted memory: Deja vu is a false feeling of familiarity. It occurs when one feels that a situation or location is familiar even though it hasn't been previously experienced. It can be thought of as a brief malfunction of the memory system where the timing of the event gets assigned as if it occurred in the past making it seem like an old memory. It occurs more commonly in temporal lobe epilepsy. ...Read more

15

15
Frontal lobe epilepsy deja vu?

Distorted memory: Deja vu is a false feeling of familiarity. It occurs when one feels that a situation or location is familiar even though it hasn't been previously experienced. It can be thought of as a brief malfunction of the memory system where the timing of the event gets assigned as if it occurred in the past making it seem like an old memory. It occurs more commonly in temporal lobe epilepsy. ...Read more

17

17
Had MRI of brain. States diffuse pathologic t2 hypersignall noted bilaterally in frontal parietal regions. I'm scared....Dementia? ? Ms???

Had MRI of brain. States diffuse pathologic t2 hypersignall noted bilaterally in frontal parietal regions. I'm scared....Dementia? ? Ms???

Discuss w/ provider: One of the most important parts of imaging is providing meaningful and clear explanations of results to the patient and their family. There is no need for you to suffer additional hrm from being scared. Don't wait - call for a followup visit ASAP. Meanwhile - stop trying to guess at the meaning. It takes doctors years to understand these results. You'll Best! ...Read more

See 2 more doctor answers
Dr. Brian Le Dr. Le
2 doctors agreed:
18

18
What is occipital neuralgia complex?

Dr. Brian Le Dr. Le
2 doctors agreed:
What is occipital neuralgia complex?

Occipital neuralgia: Occipital neuralgia is a neurological condition in which the occipital nerves (the nerves run from the top of the cervical spine up through the scalp) are inflamed or injured. Occipital neuralgia is characterized by severe pain that begins in the upper neck and back of the head as well as chronic headache. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
19

19
Could temporal lobe epilepsy contribute towards schizophrenia?

Could temporal lobe epilepsy contribute towards schizophrenia?

No: But I have encountered several patients incorrectly diagnosed with schizophrenia who were instead suffering from undiagnosed and untreated focal epilepsy (TLE). Focal epilepsy can be very hard to spot, particularly if temporal or on undersurface of the brain. Continuous videotelemetry EEG (EMU) are key, though I have picked up several on routine EEG. ...Read more

See 2 more doctor answers
20

20
Trigeminal neuralgia means pain where?

Trigeminal neuralgia: trigeminal neuralgia involves the face, usually on just one side and can involved the forehead, eye, cheek and jaw. Bilateral TN is usually only seen in patients with MS. ...Read more

See 3 more doctor answers