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Doctor insights on: Oligohydramnios Placental Infarction

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Does pregnancy-induced hypertension cause placental abruption?

Does pregnancy-induced hypertension cause placental abruption?

Yes: High blood pressure, whether present before pregnancy or whether it develops during pregnancy, does increase a woman's risk for abruption. But most women with high blood pressure never have an abruption. ...Read more

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Dr. Mark Pack
3 doctors shared insights

Infarction (Definition)

When the blood supply of a tissue is compromised by whatever mechanism, the tissue will stop working and if blood flow is not restored, the tissue will eventually die ("infarct", both verb and noun). The clinical picture that runs with development of an infarct ("heart attack"; ...Read more


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What is intra uterine fetal death?

What is intra uterine fetal death?

In utero demise: An intrauterine fetal death or demise is a pregnancy complication where the fetus dies in the uterus before labor occurs. It usually requires labor induction or a d & e to remove the fetus and the other products of conception from the uterus. ...Read more

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Could placenta previa lead to placenta percreta?

Could placenta previa lead to placenta percreta?

PP can be percreta: A placenta prévia can invade the uterine and cervical tissues and be associated with a placenta increta and placenta percreta. ...Read more

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Is placenta previa hereditary?

Is placenta previa hereditary?

no: Placenta previa is an obstetric complication in which the placenta is inserted partially or wholly in lower uterine segment.It can sometimes occur in the later part of the first trimester, but usually during the second or third. It is a leading cause of antepartum haemorrhage (vaginal bleeding). It affects approximately 0.4-0.5% of all labours. ...Read more

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What causes a placental abruption?

What causes a placental abruption?

Shearing forces: Abruption is a bleed from the placenta; a disruption of either the mother or baby's blood supply. Many causes: trauma, high blood pressure, drugs (cocaine), preterm labor, polyhydramnios. Can be very large or very small, so even US can miss a diagnosis. Symptoms: usually preterm contractions, sometimes vaginal bleed. Fetal monitoring is necessary. Wait, watch; abruption can self-heal sometimes. ...Read more

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Could an inutero twin death cause fetal lobulation in the surviving twin ?

Could an inutero twin death cause fetal lobulation in the surviving twin ?

Are you referring: to fetal lobulation of the kidneys? That is a normal anatomic variant, not related to an in utero twin. ...Read more

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Subchorionic hemorrhage, placental abruption, oligohydramnios (20w3d). What does this all mean? Is it serious?

Subchorionic hemorrhage, placental abruption, oligohydramnios (20w3d). What does this all mean? Is it serious?

Placenta: This means there is a collection of blood between the placenta and the uterine wall- therefore the abruption, the term oligohydramnios basically means low amniotic fluid and can have multiple causes including placenta dysfunction on the side of the mother, of problems with the fetus- problems with the kidneys. Please speak to your physician and seek a referral to a perinatologist. ...Read more

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What is a placental abruption?

What is a placental abruption?

Placenta detaches: Placental abruption is when the placenta detaches from the uterine wall before the baby is born. This happens in only 1% of pregnancies. It can be dangerous as the baby may not get the same amount of oxygen and nutrients if the abruption is large. Patients may or may not have vaginal bleeding. Abruption has been linked to maternal high blood pressure, Cocaine use, abdominal trauma and smoking. ...Read more

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Can fetal pyelectasis be fatal?

Can fetal pyelectasis be fatal?

No.: Fetal pyelectasis refers to borderline prominence of the renal collecting system and is defined as >4 mm by 20 weeks; >7 mm between 20-30 weeks and >8 mm after 30 weeks. It is seen in 3% of all pregnancies associated with polyhydramnios and diabetes mellitus. It is a very weak marker of increased risk for fetal down syndrome but never causes mortal risk. Neonatal follow-up is required! ...Read more

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What causes a placental abruption ?

What causes a placental abruption ?

Shearing forces: Abruption is a bleed from the placenta; a disruption of either the mother or baby's blood supply. Many causes: trauma, high blood pressure, drugs (cocaine), preterm labor, polyhydramnios. Can be very large or very small, so even US can miss a diagnosis. Symptoms: usually preterm contractions, sometimes vaginal bleed. Fetal monitoring is necessary. Wait, watch; abruption can self-heal sometimes. ...Read more

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Risk for fetal injury related to reduced placental perfusion from vasospasm?

Risk for fetal injury related to reduced placental perfusion from vasospasm?

Could be: Anytime there is decreased blood flow to the placenta, the fetus will be under some stress, depending on the amount of decreased oxegen and nutrient delivery. ...Read more

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Define?accute anteroseptal myocardial infarction, atherosclerotic obstructive coronary artery disease, pulmonary edema, cardiogenic shock, hypokalemia

Define?accute anteroseptal myocardial infarction, atherosclerotic obstructive coronary artery disease, pulmonary edema, cardiogenic shock, hypokalemia

Here are some...: A 400-letter space is impossible to address many indicated subjects as questioned here. Why not type in the terms as keywords to search online? Thereby you surely gain a lot of pertinent information to feed your appetite of knowledge. Or you may just ask your doc who should be able to answer your questions to the point much easier. ...Read more

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Can progesterone defiency cause placental abruption ?

Can progesterone defiency cause placental abruption ?

Great question!: Not known. Placenta is the major producer of Progesterone in pregnancy, and Progesterone serves to keep the uterus quiet as the fetus grows. It is possible that perturbations in the uteroplacental interface (eg placental infarction) could lead to both Progesterone decline and increased risk for abruption. No study has addressed this to date; abruption remains an impossible complication to predict. ...Read more

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What is acute neonatal hydramnios?

What is acute neonatal hydramnios?

About the fetus: When the fetus is developing their is too much fluid in the uterine sac for fetal development. ...Read more

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If high bp, what is risk for fetal injury from reduced placental perfusion secondary to vasospasm?

If high bp, what is risk for fetal injury from reduced placental perfusion secondary to vasospasm?

IUGR: Intrauterine growth retardation can be caused by decreased blood flow to the placenta. Asymmetric iugr has a better prognosis than symmetrical iugr, but every pregnacy is unique and you should discuss this with your ob. ...Read more

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Can normal seperation of placenta during birth cause Amniotic Fluid Embolisim?

Very rare event: Amniotic fluid embolism is a very rare event occurring in about 1/50,000 deliveries. The exact cause in unknown. ...Read more

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Can ultrasound show that fetus died because of maternal thrombophilia?

Can ultrasound show that fetus died because of maternal thrombophilia?

Sorta: HYDROPS fetalis is pretty obvious. But the blood and pathology reports are definitive. http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/007308.htm ...Read more

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Is it possible for you to see a placental infarction on an ultrasound?

Is it possible for you to see a placental infarction on an ultrasound?

Difficult to see: Most placental infacts are difficult to see on ultrasound.Sometimes they may be seen as a hypoechoic region affecting the placenta. ...Read more

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What are the symptoms of placenta infarction?

What are the symptoms of placenta infarction?

HTN, FGR, oligo.: Placental infarction is a pathologically determined diagnosis that underlies a multitude of adverse perinatal outcomes such as fetal growth restriction, oligohydramnios, placental failure, preeclampsia/hypertension and placental abruption. It has symptoms of preeclampsia, small uterus and stillbirth. ...Read more

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What is the treatment for placenta infarction?

What is the treatment for placenta infarction?

Here are my thoughts: Placental infarcts, if they occur in an ongoing pregnancy, would lead me to have concern for the well being of the fetus. So addressing the underlying disease that caused the infarcts is important. In addition testing of the fetus for its well being should occur. I might also treat the mom so that the fetus received the best placental function possible, examples: rest, hydration & possibly oxygen. ...Read more

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What is the definition or description of: placenta infarction?

Loss of blood supply: A placental infarction occurs when the blood supply to parts of the placenta has been disrupted. This can occur in a hypercoaguable state. ...Read more

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Subchorionic hemorrhage, placental abruption, oligohydramnios (20w3d). What does this all mean? Is it serious?

Placenta: This means there is a collection of blood between the placenta and the uterine wall- therefore the abruption, the term oligohydramnios basically means low amniotic fluid and can have multiple causes including placenta dysfunction on the side of the mother, of problems with the fetus- problems with the kidneys. Please speak to your physician and seek a referral to a perinatologist. ...Read more

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I have a spleenic infarction what has to be done to repair this?

Why?: It will heal on its own but the cause should be sought and corrected. Why did you get a splenic infarction? ...Read more

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How do infarction and gangrene differ?

How do infarction and gangrene differ?

Infarction is the...: Death of tissue, like a myocardial infarction (heart attack) or a brain infarction (stroke). Gangrene implies an infection, not necessarily of dead tissue but it generally leads to dead tissue. ...Read more

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Where do most myocardial infarctions occur?

Where do most myocardial infarctions occur?

Varies: You have three main blood vessels feeding the heart - the right coronary, left circumflex, and the left anterior descending arteries. Narrowing can occur in any of the vessels and can be significant in any one or combination of these vessels. Bypass of the left anterior descending artery has shown the best change for improvement in life expectancy. ...Read more

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What is the definition of non-q-wave infarction?

What is the definition of non-q-wave infarction?

EKG diagnosis: When a piece of heart muscle dies, it no longer has electrical activity. This shows up on an ekg as a q wave. If someone clinically has a heart attack but the ekg never evolves q waves, it is (by definition) a "non-q wave" mi. ...Read more

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What is a renal infarction?

What is a renal infarction?

Kidney death: If the blood supply to the kidney is blocked or damaged (by clot or trauma), kidney tissue dies. Renal infarction can involve some or all of 1 or both kidneys. Since the kidneys are a vital organ and they don't regenerate if dead (they can recover from acute tubular necrosis, a separate condition) this is potentially very serious and warrants specialty evaluation/care. ...Read more

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How can troponin relate to myocardial infarctions?

How can troponin relate to myocardial infarctions?

Injured heart muscle: Injured heart muscle leak troponin into the blood stream and cause elevated blood levels. ...Read more

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What is an abnormal condition called pituitary infarction?

Loss of blood supply: Pituitary infarction is due to loss of blood supply. Sometimes the pituitary enlarges in pregnancy & after delivery the pituitary involutes & dies. Another issue can be pituitary apoplexy when a pituitary tumor outgrows its blood supply & dies with or without bleeding. ...Read more

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Is there a connection with cholesterol and myocardial infarctions?

Is there a connection with cholesterol and myocardial infarctions?

LDLHDLnotCholesterol: It have been known, for over 7 decades, that artery disease typically begins ~age 7, yet remains asymptomatic for decades; artery walls thicken & enlarge, not narrow. Events, including stenosis (narrowing), result from plaque rupture & clots. Optimize NMR particle test (hdl & LDL concentration, not cholesterol), keep hba1c low, optional ?5.0%, sbp ?120 mmhg, don’t smoke, exercise, avoid sugar, etc. ...Read more

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What is a myocardial infarction?

What is a myocardial infarction?

Heart stroke: A heart stroke is also known as a myocardial infarction or heart attack. A blood clot forms in a heart blood vessel. This cuts off flow to a part of the heart and that part dies. This can cause pain, rhythm and pumping disturbances. These things can result in disability or death. ...Read more

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What is a myocardial infarction?

What is a myocardial infarction?

Heart attack: Myocardial infarction mean death ("infarction") of heart muscle (card ~heart and myo~muscle). This happens when the heart muscle is not getting the oxygen it needs over a relatively long period of time. This can happen from a narrowing of a blood vessel which reduces flow or from a suddenly, totally blocked vessel. The heart can't stop working, so that part keeps trying to pump blood until the the ...Read more

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What is causes of myocardial infarction in young?

What is causes of myocardial infarction in young?

Variable: A congenital anomaly of one or more heart( coronary arteries) vessels high blood pressure high cholesterol high triglycerides smoking depends on what you mean as young? Cocaine abuse is a problem. ...Read more

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What are the complication of myocardial infarction?

Several possible: There are a range of possible complications. The heart is a muscle, and can be weakened by a heart attack and lead to heart failure. The heart has a conduction system which can be damaged and can lead to arrhythmias and cardiac arrest. Many people die from their heart attack, while others have one and don't realize it. Unfortunately about 1/2 of the time the first sign of heart disease is death. ...Read more

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Dr. CESAR HOLGADO
191 doctors shared insights

Oligohydramnios (Definition)

An AFI (amniotic fluid index) of less than 5cm or a largest vertical pocket measurement of less than 2cm is ...Read more


Dr. Stefan Kostadinov
5 doctors shared insights

Placenta Infarction (Definition)

A placental infarction occurs when the blood supply to parts of the placenta has been disrupted. This can occur ...Read more