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Doctor insights on: Oligohydramnios Placental Infarction

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Does pregnancy-induced hypertension cause placental abruption?

Does pregnancy-induced hypertension cause placental abruption?

Yes: High blood pressure, whether present before pregnancy or whether it develops during pregnancy, does increase a woman's risk for abruption. But most women with high blood pressure never have an abruption. ...Read more

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Dr. Amrita Dosanjh
3 doctors shared insights

Infarction (Definition)

When the blood supply of a tissue is compromised by whatever mechanism, the tissue will stop working and if blood flow is not restored, the tissue will eventually die ("infarct", both verb and noun). The clinical picture that runs with development of an infarct ("heart attack"; ...Read more


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What is intra uterine fetal death?

What is intra uterine fetal death?

In utero demise: An intrauterine fetal death or demise is a pregnancy complication where the fetus dies in the uterus before labor occurs. It usually requires labor induction or a d & e to remove the fetus and the other products of conception from the uterus. ...Read more

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Could placenta previa lead to placenta percreta?

Could placenta previa lead to placenta percreta?

PP can be percreta: A placenta prévia can invade the uterine and cervical tissues and be associated with a placenta increta and placenta percreta. ...Read more

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Is placenta previa hereditary?

Is placenta previa hereditary?

no: Placenta previa is an obstetric complication in which the placenta is inserted partially or wholly in lower uterine segment.It can sometimes occur in the later part of the first trimester, but usually during the second or third. It is a leading cause of antepartum haemorrhage (vaginal bleeding). It affects approximately 0.4-0.5% of all labours. ...Read more

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What causes a placental abruption?

What causes a placental abruption?

Shearing forces: Abruption is a bleed from the placenta; a disruption of either the mother or baby's blood supply. Many causes: trauma, high blood pressure, drugs (cocaine), preterm labor, polyhydramnios. Can be very large or very small, so even US can miss a diagnosis. Symptoms: usually preterm contractions, sometimes vaginal bleed. Fetal monitoring is necessary. Wait, watch; abruption can self-heal sometimes. ...Read more

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Could an inutero twin death cause fetal lobulation in the surviving twin ?

Could an inutero twin death cause fetal lobulation in the surviving twin ?

Are you referring: to fetal lobulation of the kidneys? That is a normal anatomic variant, not related to an in utero twin. ...Read more

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Subchorionic hemorrhage, placental abruption, oligohydramnios (20w3d). What does this all mean? Is it serious?

Subchorionic hemorrhage, placental abruption, oligohydramnios (20w3d). What does this all mean? Is it serious?

Placenta: This means there is a collection of blood between the placenta and the uterine wall- therefore the abruption, the term oligohydramnios basically means low amniotic fluid and can have multiple causes including placenta dysfunction on the side of the mother, of problems with the fetus- problems with the kidneys. Please speak to your physician and seek a referral to a perinatologist. ...Read more

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What is a placental abruption?

What is a placental abruption?

Placenta detaches: Placental abruption is when the placenta detaches from the uterine wall before the baby is born. This happens in only 1% of pregnancies. It can be dangerous as the baby may not get the same amount of oxygen and nutrients if the abruption is large. Patients may or may not have vaginal bleeding. Abruption has been linked to maternal high blood pressure, Cocaine use, abdominal trauma and smoking. ...Read more

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Can fetal pyelectasis be fatal?

Can fetal pyelectasis be fatal?

No.: Fetal pyelectasis refers to borderline prominence of the renal collecting system and is defined as >4 mm by 20 weeks; >7 mm between 20-30 weeks and >8 mm after 30 weeks. It is seen in 3% of all pregnancies associated with polyhydramnios and diabetes mellitus. It is a very weak marker of increased risk for fetal down syndrome but never causes mortal risk. Neonatal follow-up is required! ...Read more

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What causes a placental abruption ?

What causes a placental abruption ?

Shearing forces: Abruption is a bleed from the placenta; a disruption of either the mother or baby's blood supply. Many causes: trauma, high blood pressure, drugs (cocaine), preterm labor, polyhydramnios. Can be very large or very small, so even US can miss a diagnosis. Symptoms: usually preterm contractions, sometimes vaginal bleed. Fetal monitoring is necessary. Wait, watch; abruption can self-heal sometimes. ...Read more

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Risk for fetal injury related to reduced placental perfusion from vasospasm?

Risk for fetal injury related to reduced placental perfusion from vasospasm?

Could be: Anytime there is decreased blood flow to the placenta, the fetus will be under some stress, depending on the amount of decreased oxegen and nutrient delivery. ...Read more

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Define?accute anteroseptal myocardial infarction, atherosclerotic obstructive coronary artery disease, pulmonary edema, cardiogenic shock, hypokalemia

Define?accute anteroseptal myocardial infarction, atherosclerotic obstructive coronary artery disease, pulmonary edema, cardiogenic shock, hypokalemia

Here are some...: A 400-letter space is impossible to address many indicated subjects as questioned here. Why not type in the terms as keywords to search online? Thereby you surely gain a lot of pertinent information to feed your appetite of knowledge. Or you may just ask your doc who should be able to answer your questions to the point much easier. ...Read more

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Can progesterone defiency cause placental abruption ?

Can progesterone defiency cause placental abruption ?

Great question!: Not known. Placenta is the major producer of Progesterone in pregnancy, and Progesterone serves to keep the uterus quiet as the fetus grows. It is possible that perturbations in the uteroplacental interface (eg placental infarction) could lead to both Progesterone decline and increased risk for abruption. No study has addressed this to date; abruption remains an impossible complication to predict. ...Read more

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What is acute neonatal hydramnios?

What is acute neonatal hydramnios?

About the fetus: When the fetus is developing their is too much fluid in the uterine sac for fetal development. ...Read more

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If high bp, what is risk for fetal injury from reduced placental perfusion secondary to vasospasm?

If high bp, what is risk for fetal injury from reduced placental perfusion secondary to vasospasm?

IUGR: Intrauterine growth retardation can be caused by decreased blood flow to the placenta. Asymmetric iugr has a better prognosis than symmetrical iugr, but every pregnacy is unique and you should discuss this with your ob. ...Read more

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Can normal seperation of placenta during birth cause Amniotic Fluid Embolisim?

Very rare event: Amniotic fluid embolism is a very rare event occurring in about 1/50,000 deliveries. The exact cause in unknown. ...Read more

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Can ultrasound show that fetus died because of maternal thrombophilia?

Can ultrasound show that fetus died because of maternal thrombophilia?

Sorta: HYDROPS fetalis is pretty obvious. But the blood and pathology reports are definitive. http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/007308.htm ...Read more

Dr. CESAR HOLGADO
191 doctors shared insights

Oligohydramnios (Definition)

An AFI (amniotic fluid index) of less than 5cm or a largest vertical pocket measurement of less than 2cm is ...Read more


Dr. Stefan Kostadinov
5 doctors shared insights

Placenta Infarction (Definition)

A placental infarction occurs when the blood supply to parts of the placenta has been disrupted. This can occur ...Read more