Nystagmus - Doctor answers

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Dr. Kenneth Adams
116 Doctors shared insights

Nystagmus (Overview)

Nystagmus is a rapid involuntary movement of the eyes. It can be horizontal- side to side and/or vertical up and down. Also known as "dancing eyes."


Dr. Kenneth Adams
116 Doctors shared insights

Nystagmus (Overview)

Nystagmus is a rapid involuntary movement of the eyes. It can be horizontal- side to side and/or vertical up and down. Also known as "dancing eyes."


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How do you treat nystagmus?

Nystagmus treatment: Most nystagmus is congenital in nature and the only treatment is giving glasses or contact lenses to maximize vision. If it is new onset, it needs to be evaluated by an ophthalmologist to determine the cause. ...Read more

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Can someone tell me about nystagmus and how it can be treated?

Nystagmus: Nystagmus is involuntary rapid and repetitious movement of the eyes from side to side or up and down. It occurs as a part of some other disorder
there is usually no cure for it. ...Read more

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What is nystagmus?

What is nystagmus?

It is: Uncontrolled eye movements where the eyes move continuously. Nystagmus is common in people who have poor vision prior to age 4. It can also occur with neurologic conditions as well. ...Read more

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What is the treatment for nystagmus?

Nystagmus: Treatment depends on the cause. See a neurologist and/or neuro-ophthalmologist for an examination to determine the reason the nystagmus is present. ...Read more

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What are the treatments for non-congenital nystagmus?

None: Usually no treatment for neurologic nystagmus but see a muscle specialist would certainly be indicated to make a definitive diagnosis and to recommend a treatment plan. ...Read more

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What's the cure for nystagmus?

Depends on cause: Congenital nystagmus perhaps can be helped by various prismatic lenses, but no cure. Acquired nystagmus sec to trauma might respond to vestibular rehab (epley maneuver), nystagmus in ms might be quelled by steroids or acthar if a relapse issue, but all in all, nystagmus is not a disease but rather a sign of dysfunction at the base of the brain, and need to understand cause prior to success. ...Read more

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Can you clarify what nystagmus really is?

Rapid eye (s) shaking: Nystagmus occurs frequently in those born with low vision in both eys, or conditions like albinism or aniridia. It may in part be a protective adaption to prevent too much light from hitting the retina. Sometimes it occurs with no eye problem as a wiring issue with the brain stem. Adults get short term nystagmus from intoxicants and some medications. ...Read more

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How do I avoid developing nystagmus?

Unlikely: Most nystagmus is congenital and deals with either defects in the central vision (such as albinos) or "wiring" defects in the ocular muscular control centers. These are developmental and cannot be avoided. Adult onset nystagmus comes about most from side effects of medications or intoxications. You can avoid these by changing the medications or the behavior. ...Read more

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Does nystagmus get worse with age?

Usually not: Nystagmus is basically constant throughout life. There actually is a slight slowing with time just as most functions slow done. But the vision and function will be unchanged ...Read more

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What is nystagmus?

It is: Uncontrolled eye movements where the eyes move continuously. Nystagmus is common in people who have poor vision prior to age 4. It can also occur with neurologic conditions as well. ...Read more

See 2 more doctor answers
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What causes nystagmus?

Nystagmus: Nystagmus can be congenital and is a life long condition. Acquired nystagmus is pathological and requires immediate assessment and treatment of the underlying pathology causing it. ...Read more

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Why do I have nystagmus?

Why do I have nystagmus?

Nystagmus: It is involuntary rapid eye movements in side tot side or up and down or rotational basis. 2 kinds: infantile and adult onset. Causes of acquired are inner ear problems, brain injury, trauma, certain medications, vitamin B12 and thiamin deficiencies, etc.
See your doctor to b e evaluated. ...Read more