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Doctor insights on: Nuclear Radiation Effects

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How long does it take for radiation effects to wear off?

How long does it take for radiation effects to wear off?

This can vary: Depending on what part of the body was radiated, as well as if there is chemotherapy involved. But, most patients can look back about 6 weeks later after completing radiation therapy and clearly see that most symptoms of the treatment have improved. ...Read more

Gamma Rays (Definition)

This is light of extremely short wavelengths typically produced either among the stars / in cosmic rays or by radioactive element decay. Gamma rays form the background of normal radiation in which we all live; it is substantially greater than the exposure we get from imaging scans or should get from ...Read more


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Do I need to worry about radiation effects from an x-ray?

Do I need to worry about radiation effects from an x-ray?

The theoretical: increased risk for any individual xray is minimal. For a medically indicated xray, the diagnostic benefit outweighs the minimal risk, so although it is always prudent to be aware of cumulative xray exposure, worrying excessively about X-rays could lead to imprudent and dangerous health care decisions. You can calculate the risks at xrayrisk.com. ...Read more

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Is there anything I can do before x-rays to prevent negative radiation effects?

Other than: shielding when appropriate, no. Keep in mind that the theoretical risk is minimal for any particular xray. You can calculate it with an interactive tool at xrayrisk.com ...Read more

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What are worst breast cancer radiation effects?

What are worst breast cancer radiation effects?

FIBROSIS: Radiation pneumonitis with fibrosis is the most serious. Also radiation esophagitis and scarring of the skin. Most resolve to some degree with time and steroids. ...Read more

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What are the immediate effects of acute radiation exposure? Such as in a nuclear reactor accident?

Nuclear reactor: Core melt down spews a number of products skyward. The most prominent 2 are iodine isotopes, leading to increase in thyroid cancer. Iodide or iodine pills 'protect' by consuming the absorption traps, blocking the isotopic dangerous ones. The other is strontium isotopes, which as a divalent cation long acting cation like calcium, can deposit in bones. ...Read more

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Are the concerns about radiation from imaging overhyped?Just read numerous articles stating you need way more msv than a nuclear scan to be concerned?

Yes and No: For the most part, the concerns about radiation from imaging are overhyped. It is true that a patient receives a dose of radiation for every x-ray, CT and Nuclear study. But the amount is small. A patient can also receive a dose of radiation from riding an airplane, living in a house made from bricks or concrete, and dozens of other every day exposures. Doctors try to minimize medical exposures. ...Read more

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Will a hida nuclear scan expose me to dangerous radiation?

Will a hida nuclear scan expose me to dangerous radiation?

No: All imaging tests that expose a patient to radiation should only be performed for certain conditions/symptoms. That is called appropriate use. Medical radiation is a useful tool, but it should not be used unless necessary to help make a diagnosis. Radiology is always trying to balance radiation dose with image quality. This is called alara - as low as reasonably achievable. ...Read more

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How often can nuclear stress test be safely repeated, would doing two tests in 4 month be safe. Any radiations concerns. ?

No sig danger: The amount of radiation is pretty minimal. If its indicated, it should be fine but why repeat it after only 4 months? ...Read more

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My friend went to Japan, 8 hours from Fukishima (nuclear reactor 3yrs ago). Would she have any radiation, would it spread to me or clothes? And why?

My friend went to Japan, 8 hours from Fukishima (nuclear reactor 3yrs ago). Would she have any radiation, would it spread to me or clothes? And why?

No: No risk. First she was a long distance from the radiation, and not likely exposed. Second it would not accumulate in her or her clothes unless directly exposed. Third three years have passed and any small amount of radioactive material that she might have had on her clothing would have been washed away in three years of laundering. ...Read more

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What are the benefits and risk for nuclear medicine procedures? I heard that there will be radiation exposure associating with the procedures, how harmful is this to my body?

What are the benefits and risk for nuclear medicine procedures? I heard that there will be radiation exposure associating with the procedures, how harmful is this to my body?

Physiologic study: Nuclear medicine involves using internal irradiation in order to define function of various organ systems of body, . Some isotopes are injected iv, inhaled, and some ingested. Most diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures involve low doses of radiation. The isotopes of higher doses are used to treat thyroid diseases or cancer. Benefits are from diagnosis of abnormality that can be detected/ treated. ...Read more

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How can ionizing radiation from nuclear explosions cause cancer?

How can ionizing radiation from nuclear explosions cause cancer?

Damaging genes: Inhaling or ingesting the radioactive particles that come from the explosing is also risky -- in fact, after chernobyl, most of the problems are thyroid concerns from the iodine. People in hiroshima and nagasaki had a significant rise especially in rates of leukemia, civilians exposed to tests had less cancers long-term than many had feared. ...Read more

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What is the difference between radiation therapy and nuclear medicine?

What is the difference between radiation therapy and nuclear medicine?

Nuc Med injects dyes: In nuclear medicine, we inject radioactive "dyes" to image or treat patients. In radiation oncology, x-rays are generated outside the patient and irradiate tumors (usually) that are in the body. They treat different diseases. ...Read more

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What is the difference between nuclear medicine and radiation oncology?

What is the difference between nuclear medicine and radiation oncology?

Specialties: Nuclear medicine and radiation oncology or radiation therapy are not the same, but there is some overlap. Nuclear medicine typically includes some imaging like bone scans and pet scans as well as maybe some therapy with unsealed sources. Radiation oncology can also include unsealed sources (that's the overlap) as well as external beam rt and brachythearpy but no imaging. ...Read more

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Had nuclear stress about 13 years ago don't remember meds used! Had HIDA 2 yrs ago plus annual mammos. Too much radiation? Nuclear dangerous?

Nuclear stress test: It would be unusual for a 33 year old woman to have a condition where a nuclear stress test was helpful. The effects of radiation exposure are measured in very small numbers -- while not zero, the risk of a radiation side effect is quite low from the kinds of diagnostic tests you've had. The goal is to keep radiation exposure as low as reasonably possible, while using tests when needed. ...Read more

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My friend went to Japan, 8 hours from Fukishima (tsunami/nuclear reactor). Would she have any radiation, would it spread to me or clothes?why?detail

No: Radiation is energy, like sunlight or radio waves. Unless your friend picks up particles from the reactor that emit radiation and brings them back (not at all likely) you can't get radiated from her. ...Read more

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I touched shampoo bottles from Japan. From 3 yrs ago where the tsunami/nuclear reactors happened. Would radiation be on me or my clothes? And why?

No danger: Radiation damage occurs when the radiation waves pass through a substance and cause damage. Just touching an object like a shampoo bottle would not contaminate you or your clothing. ...Read more

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What are the differences between radiography, radiation therapy, and nuclear medicine?

What are the differences between radiography, radiation therapy, and nuclear medicine?

Different radiation: Radiography or x-ray involves low dose ionizing radiation with images of chest , skeleton, skull etc. Radiation therapy uses high dose ionizing to treat tumors with external or internal irradiation. Nuclear medicine involves low dose ionizing radiation in form of isotopes that are internally injected intravenously. Inhaled, injected subcutaneously, or ingested orally. ...Read more

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Is nuclear medicine considered internal radiation therapy? For some reason, it seems like all the definitions of internal radi don't include nuclear.

Yes: Nuclear Medicine includes tests such as PET and other scans that can assess tumors & evaluate the function of various organs. It also includes giving radioisotopes by mouth or vein for the treatment of certain cancers (most commonly thyroid, lymphoma and bone mets) and hyperthyroidism. This is different than brachytherapy done by Radiation Oncologists in which radioactive seeds are put in a tumor ...Read more

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