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Doctor insights on: Nuclear Medicine Whole Body Scan

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Hi, I had a question. I recently had a whole body Nuclear Medicine bone scan done and the report says "Unremarkable tracer localization is seen in the osseous structures, what does this mean?

Hi, I had a question. I recently had a whole body Nuclear Medicine bone scan done and the report says "Unremarkable tracer localization is seen in the osseous structures, what does this mean?

Bone scan: The fact that the interpreting md. Stated it appears unremarkable is an indication that your scan is normal. The description about the distribution is the regular venacular describing the normal uptake by the bone (osseous means our bony skeleton) of the material that has been injected. ...Read more

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Dr. TAPAN CHAUDHURI
109 Doctors shared insights

Nuclear Medicine (Definition)

The medical specialty of nuclear medicine involves the use of unsealed radioactive pharmaceuticals that can help image molecular flow throughout the body. The medical use of radiopharmaceuticals also includes the treatment of some cancers and bone pain. Nuclear medicine is separate from diagnostic radiology, which utilizes the use of external (sealed) radioactivity ...Read more


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How come it's "safe" to take the nuclear stuff for a nuclear medicine scan?

How come it's "safe" to take the nuclear stuff for a nuclear medicine scan?

SMALL DOSE: It is relatively safe to take nuclear stuff for medical reason because the information you receive from the nuclear medicine scan (benefit) outweighs the small risk (small amount of radiation) that you receive from it.
It has less risk that an x-ray, less risk than cigarette smoking, less risk than flying from new york to los angeles, and less risk than spending a day at the beach under hot sun. ...Read more

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Can nuclear medicine procedures affect CT scans?

Can nuclear medicine procedures affect CT scans?

Not usually: Not usually nuclear medicine affecting ct but the opposite. However ct scan with intravenous iodine contrast materials can affect thyroid scans and thyroid uptake. Renal GFR studies using glofil with i125 are also affected by iodine contrast of ct. ...Read more

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What's a nuclear medicine scan?

What's a nuclear medicine scan?

A radiology test: A nuclear scan is a type of radiology study that involves getting injected (or taking orally) a small dose of radioactive tracer that can be imaged by nuclear medicine specific scanners. It is unique in that it measures the physiology of the specific tracer instead of a person's anatomy. Typically, the radioactivity dose used for these exams is minuscule and presents no/little risk. ...Read more

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How does nuclear medicine do a bone scan?

How does nuclear medicine do a bone scan?

Tc-99m-MDP Bone Scan: Bone scan often provides an earlier diagnosis and demonstrates more lesions than are found by radiographic procedures. Tc-99m-mdp (methylene diphosphonate) is a bone seeking agent that concentrates in the mineral phase of bone. 2-3 hours after injection, 50%-60% of the activity localizing in bone and the remainder is cleared by the kidneys. F18-naf bone scans are done with pet cameras, r + expensive. ...Read more

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What are the benefits and risk for nuclear medicine procedures? I heard that there will be radiation exposure associating with the procedures, how harmful is this to my body?

What are the benefits and risk for nuclear medicine procedures? I heard that there will be radiation exposure associating with the procedures, how harmful is this to my body?

Physiologic study: Nuclear medicine involves using internal irradiation in order to define function of various organ systems of body, . Some isotopes are injected iv, inhaled, and some ingested. Most diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures involve low doses of radiation. The isotopes of higher doses are used to treat thyroid diseases or cancer. Benefits are from diagnosis of abnormality that can be detected/ treated. ...Read more

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My hida scan was unable to be done due to the nuclear medicine staying in my gallbladder and not releasing into my bowel. Does this mean my gallbladde?

My hida scan was unable to be done due to the nuclear medicine staying in my gallbladder and not releasing into my bowel. Does this mean my gallbladde?

Need more info: If the scan was a hida with cck (sincalide) augmentation, and the gallbladder (gb) filled with radioactive bile and then did not empty when cck was given, the gb ejection fraction should be low, and that indicates gb dysfunction.

If the radioactive substance (hida) did not even make it into the gb, it could be chronic or acute cholecystitis.

Either way, please see your healthcare provider. ...Read more

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I had nuclear medicine scan and was told I had an increased ischium vertabrae. Is that cause of severe lower back pain?

I had nuclear medicine scan and was told I had an increased ischium vertabrae. Is that cause of severe lower back pain?

Let me explain: Positive bone scan on these area means abnormal activity in those areas, the thing related to your back pain is the vertebrea which coulsd a lot of things, check whith your dr to see what that mens to you. Good luck, thank you. ...Read more

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I had a nuclear medicine scan and was told I had an increased ischium vertabrae. Can this cause severe lower back pain?

I had a nuclear medicine scan and was told I had an increased ischium vertabrae. Can this cause severe lower back pain?

Maybe: Sounds like you had a nuclear medicine bone scan. An abnormal finding on this study could certainly help identify the cause of low back pain. The term "ischium vertebrae" is not commonly used, I have not run across it before. Would get clarification from the person who interpreted your scan so you can more clearly know what is going on. The ischium is a pelvic bone separate from the vertebra. ...Read more

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Ct scan, mri, nuclear medicine imaging, ivp scan, how are they different?

Ct scan, mri, nuclear medicine imaging, ivp scan, how are they different?

Quite different: Ct involves xray type radiation with cross sectional imaging in transaxial, sagittal, and coronal projections. Nuclear medicine, internal irradiation either injected intravenously, inhaled, ingested, injected subcutaneously. Ivp uses injection of contrast material for visualization of kidneys and bladder with x-ray. Mr imaging uses no ionizing radiation magnetic fields to generate x-sectional images. ...Read more

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How long do I have to wait after a nuclear medicine thyroid scan, i-123, to have a fna biopsy and/or thyroid blood tests?

How long do I have to wait after a nuclear medicine thyroid scan, i-123, to have a fna biopsy and/or thyroid blood tests?

You don't wait.: Generaly speaking you do not need to wait at all after having an I 123 thyroid scan to have a biopsy. You usually have the biopsy scheduled after the results of the thyroid scan are interpreted which usually takes a day. The radiation from the I 123 is minimal. ...Read more

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What are the limitations of nuclear medicine?

What are the limitations of nuclear medicine?

Detailed anatomy: No imaging study has all of the information or answers, however nuclear medicine is especially helpful to identify physiology in the body. That is. The function. What nuclear medicine does not do well is look at the fine details of anatomy. Ct and MRI are great for looking at anatomy. ...Read more

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What are the pros and cons of nuclear medicine?

What are the pros and cons of nuclear medicine?

Pro: functional: Nuclear medicine is functional imaging of organs of body with radio tracers. Pros: early detection of myocardial infarction, differentiation of urinary obstruction from stasis, early detection of bone infection, gall bladder disease with normal anatomic studies, pet detecting very small areas of metastatic disease. Cons: uses small doses of ionizing radiation. ...Read more

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Advantages and limitations of nuclear medicine?

Advantages and limitations of nuclear medicine?

Functional imaging..: Nuclear imaging allows one to see physiologic function. The use of new nuclear fusion imaging such as pet/ct allows physicians to get the best of both worlds and see anatomy and function simultaneously.

One must always remember that nuclear procedures contribute to a patient's radiation exposure but the benefits of the nuclear procedure usually outweigh the risks of the radiation. ...Read more

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What is nuclear medicine? And what does it treat?

What is nuclear medicine? And what does it treat?

Physiologic study: Nuclear medicine involves using internal irradiation in order to define function of heart, lungs, bones, liver/spleen, stomach, thyroid gland, lymph system, kidneys, bladder, brain, parathyroid gland and gall bladder. Some isotopes are injected iv, inhaled, and some ingested. Isotopes of higher doses are used to treat thyroid diseases.Amount of irradiation controlled for individual & environment. ...Read more

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What is the examples of medicine of nuclear medicine?

What is the examples of medicine of nuclear medicine?

Many: Nuclear medicine covers a large number of medical conditions, including diagnosis and some treatments. Scans are routinely done in for the brain, thyroid gland, parathyroid, lung, heart, liver, spleen, bone and other organs. These scans are used to diagnose multiple acute and chronic diseases. Treatment of thyroid disease and some malignancies are also performed in nuclear medicine. ...Read more

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Could the benefits of nuclear medicine outweigh the risks?

Certainly: Risk of some irradiation. Dosage usually low and affects grown adult less than child. Certainly finding source of disabling pain or suffering whether gb, bone, kidney, thyroid, myocardium etc important. Always way benefits versus risk. Nuclear medicine tests determine function and physiology which usually not seen by mr, x-ray, ultrasound, or ct. Pet? Ct has bee instrumental in finding occult tumor. ...Read more

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What is the definition or description of: nuclear medicine?

What is the definition or description of: nuclear medicine?

Molecular Imaging: The medical specialty of nuclear medicine involves the use of unsealed radioactive pharmaceuticals that can help image molecular flow throughout the body. The medical use of radiopharmaceuticals also includes the treatment of some cancers and bone pain. Nuclear medicine is separate from diagnostic radiology, which utilizes the use of external (sealed) radioactivity to image the body. ...Read more

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What are the advantages and limitations of nuclear medicine?

Molecular imaging: Nuclear medicine has the ability to examine the molecular basis of disease by using very low levels of radioactivity that targets the disease-specific biomarkers and specific organs. The downside is it uses radioactivity (very little) and has somewhat limited resolution, but the modern scanners are attached to other modalities such as ct or mri. ...Read more

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What is general nuclear medicine? What are some uses of the procedure?

What is general nuclear medicine? What are some uses of the procedure?

Physiologic study: Nuclear scans involve the ingestion, intravenous injection, inhalation, subcutaneous injection, instillation into the bladder of isotopes, radiotracers, in order to define function of various organs of the body, heart, lungs, bones, liver/spleen, stomach, thyroid gland, lymph system, kidneys, bladder, brain, parathyroid gland and gall bladder. Normal values for adults and children are known. ...Read more

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