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Doctor insights on: Non Obstructing Punctate Renal

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What does renal punctate calyceal calculi mean?

What does renal punctate calyceal calculi mean?

Tiny kidney stones: Or nephrocalcinosis. Stones are either attatched to wall of kidney calices (major urinary drainage ducts), junction of the urniary clooecting ducts ; calices or possibly at ends of tiny collecting ducts draining into the calices. Could signify metabolic kidney stone disease. ...Read more

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Is it normal to have multiple tiny punctate renal calculi in both kidneys with no obstruction...And still have severe back pain?

Is it normal to have multiple tiny punctate renal calculi in both kidneys with no obstruction...And still have severe back pain?

Unrelated: Many people have tiny punctate renal calculi and are asymptomatic because of small size, location, and absence of obstruction and it would be highly unlikely that any back pain, especially severe back pain, would be attributed to these stones. In addition, these punctate stones are often in such a location that they are not accessible to treatment via eswl or endoscopy. ...Read more

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What does: Septated upper pole right renal cyst. Right kidney contains multi septated cyst, 4.5cm in size. May contain punctate calcification. - mean?

What does: Septated upper pole right renal cyst. Right kidney contains multi septated cyst, 4.5cm in size. May contain punctate calcification. - mean?

A single cyst: The cyst you have is not a simple cyst but a septate cyst, that means the cyst space inside is divided into multiple small spaces from by of bands of tissue. Calcification in the cysts is common from concretions from long standing fluid inside the cysts. But as the cyst if 4.5 cm, just be it monitored with help of US once in every yr-2 yrs to r/o cancer development. Look for pain, blood in urine ...Read more

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In your opinion what treatment for Punctate nonobstructing left upper pole renal stone. 15 mm cyst lower pole left kidney with milk of calcium.

In your opinion what treatment for Punctate nonobstructing left upper pole renal stone. 15 mm cyst lower pole left kidney with milk of calcium.

NO TREATMENT: Is indicated for what you describe except keeping yourself well hydrated! If the stone is a calcium stone you should get your medical professional's advice about limiting milk and antacids!
Hope this helps!
Dr Z ...Read more

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What does it mean when a renal CT scan shows, thinning of the cortex, punctate calcification (with no stones), and contrast extending into the calyx.

What does it mean when a renal CT scan shows, thinning of the cortex, punctate calcification (with no stones), and contrast extending into the calyx.

Atrophy: Renal cortical thinning is seen due to functional loss of nephrons. There are many causes of "medical renal disease"which result in atrophy. Hypertension is the leading cause. Punctuate calcification s are very tiny stones. Contrast is supposed to be in the calyx, so I'm uncertain why that was stated. Was there anything else related to that statement? ...Read more

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Calcified granulomas within my spleen, bilateral renal cysts, 4mm kidney stone and punctate calcifications in my pelvis, what would the underlying condition be?

Calcified granulomas within my spleen, bilateral renal cysts, 4mm kidney stone and punctate calcifications in my pelvis, what would the underlying condition be?

Mostly normal: These are all trivial imaging findings. The old stuff in your spleen probably reflects a long-ago victory over an infection with histoplasmosis. Kidney cysts are trivial and very common. The calcium stuff in your pelvis is probably phleboliths which never cause trouble. I hope the kidney stone stays in place or can be managed. ...Read more

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Sometimes it feels as my urethra is partially obstructed, are there any non invasive ways to figure out what's going on?

Sometimes it feels as my urethra is partially obstructed, are there any non invasive ways to figure out what's going on?

Not really: While a urinalysis, urine culture and physical exam are fundamental to evaluating your complaint, a urologist performing an office flexible ureteroscopy is the best means of assessing urethral obstruction. ...Read more

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Does distended gallbladder mean obstructed?

Does distended gallbladder mean obstructed?

Not necessarily: This may just mean you haven't eaten in a while and the gallbladder has accumulated a lot of bile. If you are having pain in the abdomen would get additional testing, e.g. a HIDA scan. ...Read more

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Can you tell me about obstructed gallbladder?

Can you tell me about obstructed gallbladder?

Stones: Cholelithiasis, cholecystitis can lead to stone obstruction or scarring.
May be symptomatic and require removal. ...Read more

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Can you tell me about having an obstructed gallbladder?

Can you tell me about having an obstructed gallbladder?

Remove it: Most non functioning gallbladders are a result of a stone blocking the GB duct. A laparoscopic GB removal will solve the problem for good. ...Read more

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What does mild fullness of the right renal collecting system without definite obstructing calculi mean?

What does mild fullness of the right renal collecting system without definite obstructing calculi mean?

Minimal swelling: Swelling of major urine ducts between collecting tubules and kidney pelvis, which 'funnel' draining all urine from kidney into the ureter. Mild fullness, usually within normal limits. Can signify minimal partial kidney obstruction from an anatomic narrowing, or from infection. Can also be from ureteral obstruction at bladder level, bladder neck ot urethra or bladder reflux or hight urine flow rate. ...Read more

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What causes renal problems?

What causes renal problems?

Many conditions: Urinary infection, kidney stones, diabetese, blood pressure, tumors in the kidney, multiple cyst in the kidneys and many others ...Read more

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What is renal reserve?

What is renal reserve?

Physiology: This is one more way to see how good a person's kidney function is, to decide for example whether they can be a donor. A person may be given a radioisotope and their ability to clear it measured before and after they take a protein meal. It's a test of the ability of the kidney to increase its filtration rate (as when stimulated by a protein load.) ask a nephrologist how useful it is. ...Read more

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How serious is renal failure?

It depends: Usually it depends on the reason, the severity and person health. While renal failure due to dehydration and obstruction (stones, prostate in a man)is reversible most of the the time, renal failure due to intrinsic kidney problems is sometimes hard to treat. ...Read more

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What exactly is a renal diet?

What exactly is a renal diet?

Protein/Fluid Limits: The kidney is responsible for excreting waste and maintaining an electrolyte balance. Patients with kidney disease can have a decreased capacity to do the aforementioned, so "renal diets" are focused on limiting proteins (which are metabolized into kidney-excreted wastes like urea), fluids, and electrolyte fluctuations. This is analogous to "diabetic diets" controlling blood glucose fluctuations. ...Read more

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What causes renal insufficiency?

Descriptor only: Renal insufficiency is a descriptor that your kidney function is not 100% of normal. Usually providers call a function between 60-99% insufficiency. The cause could be anything from incorrect lab (the calculated function is an estimate only), taking Ibuprofen regularly, recurrent kidney infections, hypertension, diabetes and glomerulonephritis (kidney filter inflammation). See your provider. ...Read more

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What factors affect renal failure?

What factors affect renal failure?

Renal failure: High blood pressure and prolonged uncontrolled diabetes and recurrent urine infection are BIG factors escalating renal disease to progress towards failure ...Read more

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What can I eat with renal disease?

What can I eat with renal disease?

Depends: On the level of kidney function. Patients with advanced kidney function stage iv-v have to restrict potassium, phosphorus etc in the diet. Stage i-iii kidney disease have fewer dietary restriction. ...Read more

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End stage renal failure, what to do?

End stage renal failure, what to do?

ESRD options: Patients with esrd have 4 options. One is hemodialysis (h), either at a dialysis center, doing regular or nocturnal h, or doing h at home. The second is, peritoneal dialysis. Esrd patients can receive a transplant for either a living related or a cadaveric donor. The 4th option is one that very few patients consider, and that is not starting dialysis at all leading to a fatal outcome. ...Read more

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What are the causes of renal failure?

What are the causes of renal failure?

Multiple causes: I concur with dr. Griffiths' answer in general. However, one of very common and important cause should be added, namely poorly controlled diabetes. Among the kidney diseases, minimal change lesion is very unlikely to lead to renal failure. ...Read more

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What is renal gel and why is it used?

What is renal gel and why is it used?

Renagel: Renagel is a phosphorus binder. It is used by people with chronic kidney disease and end stage renal disease to help treat high phosphorus levels in the blood. You take them with your meals and they bind the phosphorus in foods preventing it from building up in the blood. ...Read more

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What is a renal denervation procedure?

What is a renal denervation procedure?

Renal denervation: The answer is too long for the space allowed. Please go to this link for a detailed answer to your question:

http://www. Mayoclinic. Org/medical-professionals/clinical-updates/cardiovascular/treatment-hypertension-catheter-based-radiofrequency-renal-artery-sympathetic-denervation ...Read more

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What are the symptoms of renal disease?

What are the symptoms of renal disease?

Edema, fatigue: There are many different types of renal diseases with different symptoms. Symptoms may include: swelling in legs/around eyes (edema), malaise (not feeling well), fatigue, foamy urine, blood in urine, pain in kidney area (flank), decreased or increased urinary output (decreased or increased urination). These symptoms are not specific for kidney diseases and can be associated with other conditions. ...Read more

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What is the management of renal failure?

What is the management of renal failure?

Dialysis: Early on it can be managed with dietary changes. Later on dialysis is needed to remove the impurities from the blood. The kidney transplant is the permanent treatment. ...Read more

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What if you have reduced renal function?

What if you have reduced renal function?

Nephrologist: Impaired kidney function is serious. The cause must be determined. I recommend that you consult a nephrologist for evaluation and treatment. Appropriate tests will be ordered. ...Read more

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How long can you live with renal failure?

How long can you live with renal failure?

Weeks to many years: Complex question. Relates to what is causing it, at what stage it is diagnosed, the quality and consistency of care one receives (as with any chronic illness), the quality of the renal program if one needs dialysis, or renal transplant, whether complications from all the medications needed occur, whether transplant is rejected, whether donor kidney available when needed etc etc etc. ...Read more