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Doctor insights on: Neuromuscular Blocking Drug

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Is it possible that succinylcholine drugs (nicotinic depolarizing neuromuscular blocker) decrease intraocular pressure?

Is it possible that succinylcholine drugs (nicotinic depolarizing neuromuscular blocker) decrease intraocular pressure?

No: Succinylcholine is known to increase intraocular minimally when given to secure the airway. The increase is small and passing, therefore it has been used in patients with increased intraocular pressure. ...Read more

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Can succinylcholine drugs (nicotinic depolarizing neuromuscular blocker) decrease intraocular pressure? Any answers appreciated!

Can succinylcholine drugs (nicotinic depolarizing neuromuscular blocker) decrease intraocular pressure? Any answers appreciated!

No.: Succinylcholine actually causes an increase in intraocular pressure for about 10 minutes after administration.
Classic teaching was not to use succ in people with open globe injuries. There are situations, though, where using succ with other agents that lower IOP is preferred because it makes intubation more smooth, avoiding hypertension and airway reactivity that is worse for the situation anyway ...Read more

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Is there any permanent cure for neuromuscular pain and muscle spasm in chest and back? Which is better - drugs or physiotherapy?

Is there any permanent cure for neuromuscular pain and muscle spasm in chest and back? Which is better - drugs or physiotherapy?

See below: Neuromuscular pain and muscle spasm are symptoms and do not describe the cause, therefore it is not possible for me to advise about "cures". You should see a doctor to determine the cause of these symptoms if possible. ...Read more

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Do any psychiatric drugs or their withdrawals lead to arrythmias or to the development of sleep apnea or is this neuromuscular or a different issue?

Do any psychiatric drugs or their withdrawals lead to arrythmias or to the development of sleep apnea or is this neuromuscular or a different issue?

Simplify PLEASE!!: You have crammed several different questions together! Some psychoactive drugs could/can prolong the qt interval & thus might contribute to an arrhythmia. Cocaine use resulting in arrhythmia is a leading cause of sudden cardiac death in young people- even athletes (len bias) some drugs suppress respiratory drive, leading to apnea, such as the dangerous combo of opiate pain drugs with tranquilizers. ...Read more

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When are neuromuscular blocking agents used?

When are neuromuscular blocking agents used?

General anesthesia: Neuromuscular blocking agents are used during general anesthesia to help with surgery. They help keep a patient still, so that there is no movement during critical procedures, they can also assist with performance of certain procedures (abdominal surgery). Relaxed muscles can make it easier for the surgeon to get the exposure they need. ...Read more

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For electroconvulsive treatment -- can you explain neuromuscular blocking.?

For electroconvulsive treatment -- can you explain neuromuscular blocking.?

Neuromuscular blocki: Ect causes patients to have seizures, that may include vigorous muscle spasms or grand mal seizures. The purpose of temporary neuomuscular blockade is to reduce or prevent the excessive muscle activity and rarely muscle breakdown. ...Read more

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What are the symptoms of a neuromuscular disorder?

What are the symptoms of a neuromuscular disorder?

The term neuromuscul: The term neuromuscular disorder is a broad term that encompasses many different conditions. In general there is a neurologic problem that negatively influences muscle and motor function. There are usually symptoms of weakness and or impaired coordination. In order to make a correct diagnosis it is important to be evaluated by a specialist like a neurologist who can perform an appropriate eval. ...Read more

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How exactly do you treat neuromuscular diseases?

How exactly do you treat neuromuscular diseases?

Disorder related: There are many neuromuscular diseses, treatment is specific to the disorder when possible. In myasthenia gravis treatment may include surgery, immunospression and medication to improve n-m transmission. There are inflammatory muscle disorders that require prolonged immunosupression. There are nerve and muscle disorders associated with vitamin deficiencies. In others we can only treat symptoms. ...Read more

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What are some examples of neuromuscular conditions?

What are some examples of neuromuscular conditions?

Many things: There are scores, maybe hundreds. If you're having symptoms, visit your doc. Conditions include: peripheral neuropathy, myasthenia, myopathies, muscular dystrophy types, to name but a few. ...Read more

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What are the different types of neuromuscular disorders?

There are many: There is lots of information on the Web about this subject. You might start here: http://www. Nlm. Nih. Gov/medlineplus/neuromusculardisorders. Html. For more depth, there are comprehensive books on the subject, e.g. "Neuromuscular Disorders" by Amato and Russell. At 775 pp it's a good introductory text. ...Read more

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Are neuromuscular blockers and anesthesia the same thing?

No: Neuromuscular blocking agents (nmbs) are one of the components of general anesthesia, but you require many more medications to complete the job. Nmbs facilitate the placement of an endotracheal tube, and improves operating conditions for the surgeon. They do not put or keep you asleep. ...Read more

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Please tell me, are neuromuscular blockers and anesthesia the same?

Please tell me, are neuromuscular blockers and anesthesia the same?

No: Neuromuscular blockers are drugs used in the practice of anesthesia but it is not an anesthetic. They are paralytics. They are NEVER used alone. ...Read more

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Can you name neuromuscular diseases with vascular hyperreactivity?

Can you name neuromuscular diseases with vascular hyperreactivity?

Raynaud's diusease: When you use the term "vascular hyperreactivity", the closest problem that fills the description is Raynaud's phenomenon. This is most common a "stand-alone" problem that occurs with cold. It can also be a feature of connective tissue diseases such a scleroderma and related disorders. ...Read more

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Can there be a non neuromuscular cause to slightly low mip and mep. Other part of pft was normal?

Can there be a non neuromuscular cause to slightly low mip and mep. Other part of pft was normal?

Lab results: Lab results always have to be interpreted in context. Think of hearing just one note of Mozart or Beethoven or Bach and nothing else. It would be pretty meaningless! You can't just look at one number and ask what does that mean? ...Read more

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Are there clinical studies supporting neuromuscular dentistry for TMJ? Insurance will not cover the cost which can be several grand.

Are there clinical studies supporting neuromuscular dentistry for TMJ? Insurance will not cover the cost which can be several grand.

Tons of Research: There are too many scientific articles & case studies about neuromuscular dentistry to count. It works. However, as with ANY treatment philosophy & approach, it has to be done correctly, by the right dentist, on the right patient. If that's not correct, then the results won't be there either. As always, the correct diagnosis and treatment must go hand in hand. But, other approaches can work, too. ...Read more

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What happens to the heart if there is neuromuscular disorders?

Dr. Yo-El Ju Dr. Ju
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What happens to the heart if there is neuromuscular disorders?

Specifics needed: Some neuromuscular disorders, for example myotonic dystrophy, may cause heart problems such as abnormal heart rhythm. Some neuromuscular disorders do not have any associated heart problems. So it depends on the specific neuromuscular disorder - this will involve seeing a neuromuscular specialist (a type of neurologist). ...Read more

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What is the efficacy and safety of neuromuscular dentistry for TMJ (temporalis tendinitis?

What is the efficacy and safety of neuromuscular dentistry for TMJ (temporalis tendinitis?

Can be helpful: Several approaches - if isolated and occasional, anti-inflammatory meds could do the trick. NM dentistry is very effective at relaxing muscles. Some doctors like NTI appliances to relax temporal muscles. Problem is that bite problems can develop. I prefer an approach where all of the teeth touch at all times. Start simple and slowly increase treatment complexity! ...Read more

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How do you manage scoliosis when someone have neuromuscular disease?

How do you manage scoliosis when someone have neuromuscular disease?

Team effort: This is a complicated issue that grows in complexity over time. In growing children and young adults when the scoliosis begins to compromise pulmonary function, surgery becomes a consideration. Well before then the patient should be evaluated by an experienced scoliosis spine sugeon and experienced n-m pediatric neurologist. Bracing, physical therapy and pulmonary functions need to be followed. ...Read more

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My medical chart states I have neuromuscular disease. What is this? I know I'm suspected to have MS.

My medical chart states I have neuromuscular disease. What is this? I know I'm suspected to have MS.

No diagnosis yet: Neuromuscular disease is a category of disease. Sounds like your doctor's suspect something like MS but have not made the formal diagnosis yet (maybe tests are pending). ...Read more

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Can neuromuscular release technique...Will that help with sciatica pain? If not can you recommend or suggest once and for all what will resolve pain?

Can neuromuscular release technique...Will that help with sciatica pain? If not can you recommend or suggest once and for all what will resolve pain?

Spine Pain Options: This chronic pain in the distribution as you suggested is the result of an irritated nerve or facet joints or other injury typically in the lumbar spine (low back) which are caused by herniated disks, spinal stenosis or degenerative disc disease, etc requiring further evaluation by a spine specialist and may be candidate for facet injections/radiofrequency ablation and epidural steroid injection. ...Read more

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Is there a neurological or neuromuscular condition that is made worse by sertraline or other ssris?

Is there a neurological or neuromuscular condition that is made worse by sertraline or other ssris?

SSRI Side Effects: All medications can have side effects. Ssris are no different. Because the medication causes an increase in serotonin in the central nervous system, it can worsen neurological/neuromuscular conditions. There is a life threatening condition called serotonin syndrome that is possible (though unlikely). Main neurological side effects include loss of coordination, twitching, and overactive reflexes. ...Read more

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Can esophogitis be prevented when there is progressive neuromuscular problem that causes esophageal dysphagia, esp. If ppis aren't satisfactory?

Can esophogitis be prevented when there is progressive neuromuscular problem that causes esophageal dysphagia, esp. If ppis aren't satisfactory?

Use antacids as reco: PPIs are the best medicine to reduce acid production (which is the cause of esophagitis). But there is an optimum maximum dose for each PPI which you should find out from your doctor and use the full dose so that there is complete shut down of acid production. That will minimize the esophageal inflammation (Esophagitis). ...Read more

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How can neuromuscular disorders causes problems in the heart?

How can neuromuscular disorders causes problems in the heart?

Various mechanisms: Myotonic dystrophy causes heart block, may lead to sudden death, and may require a pacemaker. All people with muscular dystrophy develop cardiomyopathy and may get congestive heart failure. Multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral scerlosis don't usually cause cardiac complications. ...Read more

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Would you know of a link between neuromuscular disease and multiple sclerosis?

Would you know of a link between neuromuscular disease and multiple sclerosis?

Not usually: However, rarely a patient may suffer ms, and also, a peripheral nerve disorder called chronic demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. But no true association between this central nervous disorder and nerve/ muscle disease. ...Read more

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Father diagnosed with MS in 1992 at the age of 49. I recently started having neuromuscular issues. Should I be checked for ms?

Father diagnosed with MS in 1992 at the age of 49. I recently started having neuromuscular issues. Should I be checked for ms?

Multiple Sclerosis: Ms is not per se a genetic disorder, but may run in families; if you have neuromuscular problems which are central in origin, then yes you should be evaluated. ...Read more

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Why are long-term trached and vented patients with a neuromuscular disease who are otherwise healthy more prone to acquiring pneumonia? Thank you:)

Why are long-term trached and vented patients with a neuromuscular disease who are otherwise healthy more prone to acquiring pneumonia? Thank you:)

Several reasons: There are a couple of reasons. First the trach itself is a foreign body and gets colonized with bacteria, (that is bacteria grow on and around it) some of these bacteria can make their way into the lung. People with nmd may have a worse cough and are less mobile than others this makes clearing secretions from the lungs more difficult, as the secretions may contain bacteria, infection results. ...Read more

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