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Doctor insights on: Neurologists And Memory

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If my pc dr's referral isn't enough, can a neurologist perform the necessary memory tests to satisfy the insurance company to approve an MRI?

If my pc dr's referral isn't enough, can a neurologist perform the necessary memory tests to satisfy the insurance company to approve an MRI?

Wrong place to ask: You're wandering (and wondering) blindly. Your insurance carrier has policies for everything, probably including your situation. Check your insurer's website. If it's not there, call them and ask to be sent the relevant medical policy. It's likely that your doctor hasn't read it either. Your next move will be determined by the policy. Pay particular attention to "medical necessity" clauses. ...Read more

Dr. Bennett Machanic
1,816 doctors shared insights

Memory (Definition)

Memory is the ability to recall information ...Read more


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I'm female/62. Saw neurologist for balance/gait problems, memory loss. Told accumulated psych stress may have caused brain deficit. Tests all normal--?

I'm female/62. Saw neurologist for balance/gait problems, memory loss. Told accumulated psych stress may have caused brain deficit. Tests all normal--?

Meds may be cause : Coumadin, (warfarin) lorazepam, trazodone, and Gabapentin can all effect gait and balance. Your meds, brain surgeries, cumulative stress, and depression can all contribute to cognitive deficits, as can effects of anesthesia, depending upon when your last operation was. I once underwent seven operations in 8 weeks and was told my level of alertness might not return to normal until a year or more. It was true. ...Read more

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Diagnosis: right to left shunt now what? I've been experiencing headaches and memory loss, my np referred me to a neurologist. Results from testing were sent to np. I just left her office with a follow up to see neurologist again but the diagnosis is rig

Diagnosis: right to left shunt now what? I've been experiencing headaches and memory loss, my np referred me to a neurologist.  Results from testing were sent to np. I just left her office with a follow up to see neurologist again but the diagnosis is rig

The : The heart has two "sides": the right side pumps blood to the lungs for oxygenation and the left side pumps it to the body. A right to left shunt is one that sends blood directly from the right side to the left, bypassing the lungs. This is important for two reasons: 1) the shunted blood does not have the opportunity to drop off carbon dioxide and pick up oxygen. If the shunt is large, it will reduce the amount of oxygen in your blood and leave you easily winded. 2) the lung, in addition to increasing the oxygen level in the blood, filters out any tiny clots or other particles in the blood. When that filter is missing, there's an increased risk of strokes.

Since you have a right to left shunt, you should probably be on a blood thinner, and you should make sure that any IV lines you have placed are freed of all bubbles (the common idea that a few bubbles in a vein will cause damage is not true--unless you have a right to left shunt.

Treatment depends on the size of the shunt and its location. If it's very small, you may need nothing. However, if it's big enough to create problems (and it sounds like yours is) then it probably needs to be closed. If it's in the heart, this is done by a cardiologist using a percutaneous closure device or by a cardiac surgeon using traditional open-heart surgery. If it is in the arteries of the lung, it is treated by an interventional radiologist using small artery-blocking coils placed via a puncture in the hip area or the neck.

I don't know the joliet area well enough to know who's close by, but you can go to http://doctor-finder. Sirweb. Org/ to find an interventional radiologist in your area.

One other thing: shunts in the lung arteries are associated with a condition called osler-weber-rendu syndrome (also known as hereditary hemorrhagic telangietasia). You should be evaluated for this condition and, if you have it, your relatives should be evaluated too. It has a strong family inheritance pattern. ...Read more

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Fatigue studies (CFS?): For poor concentration & memory, could a neurologist help? Current specialist advisors: sleep, rheumat., endocrin., immun. MDs

Fatigue studies (CFS?): For poor concentration & memory, could a neurologist help? Current specialist advisors: sleep, rheumat., endocrin., immun. MDs

Team: If your team has all of these physicians on the case, adding a neurologist may be superfluous. One physician should be coordinating your care in order to access the expertise of the others. ...Read more

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Which doctor knows better about ADHD, lack of concentration, memory loss problems? A neurologist or psychatrist? Please help. I want the knowledge

Which doctor knows better about ADHD, lack of concentration, memory loss problems? A neurologist or psychatrist? Please help. I want the knowledge

Additional symptoms: For pure adhd cases, i usually recommend psychiatrists that specialize in adhd. If there are other symptoms like memory loss, changes in cognitive status or cognitive functioning, especially new or rapid changes, I would recommend a neurologist. ...Read more

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Why did a neurologist automatically assume depression, (numbness, vision problems, fuzzy memory) after negative mri? Ana positive. Gp says lupus.

Why did a neurologist automatically assume depression, (numbness, vision problems, fuzzy memory) after negative mri? Ana positive. Gp says lupus.

Depends: Lupus causing central nervous system findings is advanced & has unequivocal lab findings 2 go with significant physical findings. A positive ANA is not diagnostic of anything specific. If you had lupus causing CNS abnormalities, many other autoimmune tests are likely to be extremely elevated. Lupus would have joint & kidney findings too. Anxiety or depression are more common & likely the reason. ...Read more

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After a myriad of gradually onset problems (double vision in left eye, memory problems, dizziness, headaches etc) my doctor said my mri showed a brain lesion. I have an appt with a neurologist but not for a while. What could this mean??

After a myriad of gradually onset problems (double vision in left eye, memory problems, dizziness, headaches etc) my doctor said my mri showed a brain lesion. I have an appt with a neurologist but not for a while. What could this mean??

Could be anything: When I write my radiology reports, I don't expect the ordering doctor to ONLY say, "You have a brain lesion, see this guy/gal." The MRI report should have been discussed with you in more detail.
If the ordering doc had no idea what the radiologist was describing, he/she should have called the radiologist directly before your office visit.
See the neurologist soon and get this cleared up. ...Read more

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What tests will neurologists typically order?

What tests will neurologists typically order?

Neuro tests: Depends on the presentation & what the suspected diagnosis might be, for example they might order EEG for seizure or sleep disorders, EMG for nerve conduction problems, etc. ...Read more

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How do I start looking for the child neurologists in the country?

How do I start looking for the child neurologists in the country?

See your doctor: Start with your family doctor. He/she can get the search going. Not only can he/she begin the search, but also find a specialist that he/she is familiar with, which will facilitate dialogue. ...Read more

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How to become a neurologist?

How to become a neurologist?

Training: After finishing medical school, you undergo specialty training in residency for a minimum of four years to fulfill the minimal; requirements in the US. ...Read more

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How do neurologists detect RLS in patients?

How do neurologists detect RLS in patients?

Really by history: Restless leg syndrome is occasionally found during an overnight sleep study, but the doc diagnosis is by pt history. Going to bed, unable to stay still, as legs feel irritable, and gets up, walks about, and then can relax. Maybe legs jump a bit, maybe happens at the movies or while watching tv. Occasionally, pts have associated kidney disease, peripheral neuropathy, ferritin problems. ...Read more

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What's a neurologist?

What's a neurologist?

Like your question: Traditional answer, a doctor trained in diagnosing and treating diseases of the nervous system, involving brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerves and muscles. Included disease states, such as migraine, stroke, parkinson's, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, neuropathy and myopathy, etc. Also, deals with medical disorders which secondarlily cause neurological complications. ...Read more

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Where can I find a neurologist?

Where can I find a neurologist?

Start with your doc: I would start with your primary care doctor as they are usually a good source of info on other doctors in your area. You could also ask trusted friends/family for recommendations and bring those names to your doctor for discussion. ...Read more

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Could I ask my neurologist for certain meds?

Asking for Meds: This is a difficult question to answer. To begin with, of course you can ask your neurologist for a specific medication. However, some physicians have very strict criteria regarding narcotic medications, and most physicians will not prescribe a medication which is not appropriate for your illness, or which they are uncomfortable using.

It never hurts to ask, but they may say no. ...Read more

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Do neurologists treat dissociative disorders?

Do neurologists treat dissociative disorders?

Not alone: Neurologists may treat some people who also have dissociative disorders, but would not be doing this by themselves unless they also have full training in psychiatry. A typical scenario might be a patient who has both a seizure disorder and dissociative disorder -- needs care from both psychiatry and neurology working together. Such a person will also need psychotherapy. ...Read more

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What are the steps to becoming a neurologist?

Many steps : College for four years. Med school for four years. One year general medicine internship. Three years neurology residency. Perhaps 1-2 years fellowship training to subspecialize. ...Read more

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What can I expect at a neurologist appointment?

What can I expect at a neurologist appointment?

Let me help: The visit is similar to seeing your family doctor, in that there is an interview process to obtain a history, and an examination focusing on neurological systems. Subsequently, the doctor will discuss presumptive diagnosis, possible confirmatory testing, and recommendations for treatment. Hope outcome of your visit is beneficial. ...Read more

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How much time does it take to become a neurologist?

Minimum time: Four years of training after medical school in residency. ...Read more

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What can you expect from a neurologist appointment?

What can you expect from a neurologist appointment?

Typical: Just like an internist, the doctor will take and history and perform an examination, but here, focuses on neurological systems. A preliminary diagnosis will be provided, and testing may be ordered to confirm correct diagnosis. Treatments and/or therapy will be advised based on the above conclusions. Your neurologist is your partner to restore functioning of your central and peripheral nerves. ...Read more

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What happens during a consultation with a neurologist?

EVALUATION: Most visits are due to referral to evaluate symptoms which may be caused from either the central (brain, spinal cord) or peripheral (nerve, muscle) nervous systems. The doctor takes a full history and performs a full exam. (similar to primary care, but focusing on neuro systems). Diagnostic conclusions are reached, confirmatory tests may be ordered, and treatment based on all the above. ...Read more

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What to expect for first trip to a neurologists office?

Like a normal doctor: I believe that a visit to a neurologists office is the same as your primary care physician. The neurologist will take a detailed history and perform a comprehensive examination. The entire initial visit should last between 30 and 60 minutes in its entirety. ...Read more

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What courses will I need to take to become a neurologist?

What courses will I need to take to become a neurologist?

A good start...: Would be medical school. Neurologists have a 4-year residency after med school. If you're not in med school I would concentrate more on making this happen first. In that vein, contrary to popular belief, a specific set of courses (biology etc) is not necessary (save for prerequisites). One of the brightest physicians I know got his undergrad degree in photography? First, love what you do! ...Read more

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What to expect from a neurologist appointment first time?

Info gathering: Usually a doctor will have you fill out initial paperwork, talk to you about your history in general, as well as the history of whatever problem you're seeing him/her for, then do an exam and make some recommendations for next steps. Good luck! ...Read more

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What should I expect at an appointment with the neurologist?

History and exam: We will ask what's going on. Listen to you. Ask a few questions. Examine you. Usually we have a decent idea of the top two or three possibilities in 1-2 minutes and the rest confirms this. If you have had a scan done being the actual pictures on cd. ...Read more