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Doctor insights on: Neonatal Polycythemia

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Neonatal alloimune thrombocytopenia treatment?

Neonatal alloimune thrombocytopenia treatment?

Platelet transfusion: If the fetus has an antigen on platelets that the mother lacks, she may make antibodies that destroy the fetal platelets. Infusing platelets that lack the antigen is the treatment. Platelets can be infused into the fetus in utero, if needed, . ...Read more

Dr. Jeff Livingston
34 doctors shared insights

Neonatal (Definition)

The term neonatal is generally used to describe events that occur with an infant within the first 30 days after birth.Some practitioners are looser with the definition & extend the ...Read more


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What does Neonatal alloimune thrombocytopenia mean?

What does Neonatal alloimune thrombocytopenia mean?

NAT: Neonatal (fetus or newborn under 1 month) alloimmune (immune response to foreign antigen) thrombocytopenia (low platelet count). NAT occurs when substances from mother's body pass into the baby's system, causing destruction of platelet cells. ...Read more

Dr. Jay Park Dr. Park
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Neonatal alloimune thrombocytopenia, what is this?

Dr. Jay Park Dr. Park
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Neonatal alloimune thrombocytopenia, what is this?

Low platelets count: Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia occurs when fetal platelets contain an antigen inherited from the father that the mother lacks. The mother forms antiplatelet antibodies against the this antigen; these cross the placenta and destroy fetal platelets, resulting in fetal and neonatal thrombocytopenia. Minority of affected newborns (about 20%) experiences severe bleeding including intracranial bl ...Read more

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What is acute neonatal hydramnios?

About the fetus: When the fetus is developing their is too much fluid in the uterine sac for fetal development. ...Read more

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Meaning of neonatal jaundice?

Jaundice : Physiologic neonatal jaundice is yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes due to elevation of a breakdown product of old blood cells called bilirubin that builds up in newborns due to immaturity of liver enzymes. Pathologic neonatal jaundice can also result from various disease states. Phototherapy with special lights, or more aggressive therapy, may be needed to lower bilirubin to safe levels. ...Read more

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Whats hemolytic disease of newborn?

Different blood type: Hemolytic disease of newborn is caused by different blood types in mom and baby. Classically, mom is rh negative (a- or o-, etc). The baby is rh positive. Mom then make rh antibodies that cross over to the baby and cause breakdown of the red blood cells. This can make the baby very sick. ...Read more

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Is neonatal sepsis related to hbo incompatibility?

Neonatal sepsis: No it is caused from infection and has nothing to do with ABO incompatibilty. ...Read more

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Is polycythemia vera hereditary?

Sometimes.: Most patients with polycythemia vera develop the condition in adulthood, most commonly from an acquired mutation in the jak2 gene, and are not born with it. However, there are families who pass on the tendency to have a high red blood cell count through a variety of genetic mutations. It is usually well known in the family when that is the case. ...Read more

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How is polycythemia rubra vera differentiated from polycythemia associated with stress? RBC only elevated once in life. HGB/HCT elevated often.

How is polycythemia rubra vera differentiated from polycythemia associated with stress? RBC only elevated once in life. HGB/HCT elevated often.

Stress?: Stress doesn't cause polycythemia. Being dehydrated is a common cause. If your Hgb/Hct is only slightly elevated, stop worrying -- reference ranges are set so that several percent of healthy folks fall outside. If it's well above, consider a workup for the causes, including a variant hemoglobin and a subtle right-to-left shunt. ...Read more

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Does alpha thalassemia causes leukemia?

Does alpha thalassemia causes leukemia?

No: Alpha and beta thalassemia have not been reported to cause leukemia, which is cancer of the white blood cells. There is a study of beta thal. Major & intermedia patients in iran, where researchers found 5 leukemia cases in about 4, 600 patients. That is a higher rate of leukemia than in the general population there, but details were unavailable as to what other factors were present in the patients. ...Read more

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Tell me differences between polycythemia, polycythemia rubra vera and polycythemia vera?

Polycythemia: Polycythemia rubra vera and polycythemia vera are the same thing - a myeloproliferative disorder which causes production of too many red cells (and usually white cells and platelets also). Polycythemia or erythrocytosis just means someone has too many red cells, whether due to prv, high altitude, sleep apnea, emphysema, certain cancers, or certain congenital abnormalities of red cell production. ...Read more

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What causes neonatal encephalopathy?

What causes  neonatal encephalopathy?

See below:: In ne, it is not always possible to document a significant hypoxic-ischemic insult. There are potentially several other etiologies, specifically, it is important to exclude metabolic disease, infection, drug exposure, nervous system malformation and neonatal stroke as possible causes of the encephalopathy. The nature of brain injury causing neurologic impairment in a newborn is poorly understood. ...Read more

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Can jak 2 positive. Polycythemia vera cause chronic low grade fevers?

Can jak 2 positive. Polycythemia vera cause chronic low grade fevers?

No: Pv by itself does'nt cause low grade fevers. However, pv can increase your risk to have blood clots and blood clots can give you low grade fevers also, pv can transform into other condition i.E myelofibrosis as well as mds/ acute leukemia in about 20%-30%). Low grade fevers occur quite commonly in myelofibrosis and acute leukemia. See your md to rule out other condition i.e. Autoimmune , infection. ...Read more

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How common is neonatal jaundice?

How common is neonatal jaundice?

Very: Most term normal newborns become jaundiced peaking around the 3rd to 5th day of life. Their livers being a bit immature have trouble breaking down bilirrubin, the substance that make you jaundiced. This type of jaundice resolves in the first 2 weeks. If you are nursing your baby, the yellow pigment may linger a bit. Babies that are premature or have medical problems, may have more serious jaundice. ...Read more

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How hypoglycemia associated with neonatal growth hormon deficiency?

How hypoglycemia associated with neonatal growth hormon deficiency?

Growth Hormone: Growth hormone does much more than just affect growth. It is very active in metabolism of many types of cells, including those involved in the processing of sugars. So if you can't process the sugar in your diet correctly, it can lead to blood sugar being too low - hypoglycemia. Work closely with a pediatric endocrinologist as this is a significant disorder. ...Read more

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Difference between idiopathic thrombocytopenia purpura and thrombotic thrombocytopenia purpura?

Difference between idiopathic thrombocytopenia purpura and thrombotic thrombocytopenia purpura?

The are completely: Different. Itp is the autoimmune destruction of platelets and is managed with immunosuppression - the first line is usually prednisone. Ttp is the microvascular consumption of platelets (small clots). This can be associated with anemia, renal failure, ha and fever. It is a medical emergency and is managed with plasma exchange. ...Read more

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Dr. Michael Thompson
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Neonatal (Definition)

The term neonatal is generally used to describe events that occur with an infant within the first 30 days after birth.Some practitioners are looser with the definition & extend the ...Read more