Top
20
Doctor insights on: Need Help With Dermatosclerosis

Share
1

1
Does any one out there know about morphea scleroderma?

Does any one out there know about morphea scleroderma?

YES SEE BELOW: Morphea is a medical term for localized scleroderma. The disease involves isolated patches of hardened skin - there generally is no internal organ involvement. ...Read more

Dr. Pierre Moeser
183 doctors shared insights

Scleroderma (Definition)

An autoimmune disease in which there is excessive thickening of the connective tissues. This can cause skin tightening, rash, difficulty swallowing, and in severe cases affect ...Read more


2

2
What is the meaning of dermatosclerosis?

What is the meaning of dermatosclerosis?

Dermatosclerosis: An autoimmune disease that affects the blood vessels and connective tissue; fibrous connective tissue is deposited in the skin. ...Read more

3

3
What kind of condition is dermatosclerosis?

Bad disease: Scleroderma is a progressive disease that affects the skin and connective tissue (including cartilage, bone, fat, and the tissue that supports the nerves and blood vessels throughout the body). There are two major forms of the disorder. One localize and could effect the whole body. ...Read more

4

4
What are the key symptoms of dermatosclerosis?

Thickened skin: It is a thickening of the skin usually on the upper back and back of the neck. More common in diabetics and heavier people. Treatment is difficult as medicine is partially effective in preventing progression of problem. ...Read more

5

5
What things predispose someone to dermatosclerosis?

What things predispose someone to dermatosclerosis?

Diabetes: It is associated with diabetes and usually involves the back of neck. It is difficult to treat although to is often asymptomatic. ...Read more

6

6
What choices do I have for treating dermatosclerosis?

What choices do I have for treating dermatosclerosis?

Clarify: There is no specific disease called "dermatosclerosis." do you mean scleroderma? If so, treatment options include drugs such as penicillamine, immunosuppressives, and antiinflammatory agents, but there is no definitive cure. If you mean something else, please let us know. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
7

7
What is the definition or description of: Dermatosclerosis?

Dermatosclerosis: Dermatosclerosis = scleroderma = autoimmune disease affecting connective tissue & blood vessels. It causes skin to thicken asymmetrically due to deposits of fibrous connective tissue in the skin. ...Read more

8

8
What is scleroderma?

Hard skin: Scleroderma literally means "hard skin." it is a connective tissue disease that primarily involves the skin which becomes fibrotic (hardened). Changes also may occur in the blood vessels, muscles, and internal organs. The disease involves autoimmunity whereby the immune system attacks the normal tissues of the body. The cause is unknown. ...Read more

See 2 more doctor answers
9

9
Who gets scleroderma?

Anyone,even children: Anyone can get scleroderma, even children. Women have a higher incidence than men. There are different forms of scleroderma and those subtypes vary slightly in their incidences among people of european versus african descent. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
10

10
What causes scleroderma in people?

What causes scleroderma in people?

I hate: As a surgeon to get involved but i lost my wife in just two years... It is an autoimmune disease of unknown origin. When just suspected a sedimentation rate, ANA levels, anti scl-70 and anti-centromere antibodies should be stat done. A good resource is this web site: http://www.Synnovation.Com/sclerodermafaq.Html i would seek help from a university based rheumatology department... ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
11

11
How will my scleroderma be treated?

How will my scleroderma be treated?

Please see below: Scleroderma has no cure. But symptoms and damage can be reduced with treatment. ...Read more

See 2 more doctor answers
12

12
What can I do to treat scleroderma?

What can I do to treat scleroderma?

Depends on type: The treatment ranges from "no treatment necessary" for mild forms of localized scleroderma (limited to the skin) to bone marrow transplantation for systemic sclerosis with internal organ involvement. Though there is no cure, advances are being made in the treatment of all manifestations of the condition. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
13

13
What are the tests for scleroderma?

Scleroderma tests: The diagnosis of scleroderma is based mostly on signs and symptoms. Lab tests may help confirm the diagnosis and even offer some predictions as to risks of certain types of complications. Anti rna-polymerase iii antibody, increases risk of renal crisis and sudden increase in blood pressure, antitopoisomerase ab, increases risk for scaring of the lung, anticentromere ab, pulmonary hypertension. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
14

14
How do people with scleroderma look?

How do people with scleroderma look?

Large range: There are numerous manifestations of scleroderma but the main feature is usually hard skin. This may be thickened hard skin in patches or around just a few fingers +/or toes or around the mouth. Others may have greater involvement of arms, legs causing difficulty moving joints. Worst are disfigurement of face and widespread tight skin over chest, abdomen. ...Read more

15

15
How many people die from scleroderma?

Rare disease: Scleroderma is a very rare autoimmune disease which often results in a progressive decline in health resulting in death, due to the fact that little or no treatment options exist for scleroderma. It is quite rare, among the rarest of all immune complex diseases. ...Read more

16

16
What makes systemic scleroderma flare?

What makes systemic scleroderma flare?

Stress: There are no specific triggers to avoid if you have the condition. However, internal or external stress often precede a flare of scleroderma. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
17

17
Anyone know anything about scleroderma?

Anyone know anything about scleroderma?

Autoimmune disease : Scleroderma literally means, "hard skin" which is a prominent feature. It is an autoimmune disease that results from cells making excess collagen which hardens and tightens the skin and blood vessels and sometimes internal organs. The severity can vary greatly from person to person. Fortunately, it is a rare disease. A rheumatologist is the best doctor to evaluate and treat this disease. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
18

18
What are common symptoms of scleroderma?

What are common symptoms of scleroderma?

Skin changes: The first sign is usually patchy areas on the skin that often make a linear pattern. Early on, they are slightly pink and thickened, but can be flat and shiny. As time passes, the skin spots enlarge and often become thick and lavender/purple-colored, sometimes with pale flat centers. Scleroderma can also affect the heart, lung, kidney, joints, digestive tract. Please see your doctor if you're worried. ...Read more

19

19
What are signs, symptoms of scleroderma?

What are signs, symptoms of scleroderma?

Tight skin: People with scleroderma have tight skin, but have other findings including raynauds, finger changing color in the cold or stress, joint pain, and can have internal involvement in the lungs, heart, kidney etc. Each person has different finding and the rheumatologist helps to put it together. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
20

20
How does scleroderma progress over time?

How does scleroderma  progress over time?

Depends on type: Some forms of localized scleroderma which affect only the skin do not progress and can even improve. Other forms such as progressive systemic sclerosis can (slowly or quickly) progress to involve the blood vessels and internal organs. It is important to be diagnosed early to anticipate and treat any progressive involvement, especially involvement of the kidneys. ...Read more

Dr. Krishna Kumar
141 doctors shared insights

Dermatosclerosis (Definition)

Dermatosclerosis = scleroderma = autoimmune disease affecting connective tissue & blood vessels. It causes skin to thicken asymmetrically due to deposits of fibrous connective ...Read more