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Doctor insights on: Necrotizing Ulcerative Gingivitis Genes

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Do the gray spots on my gums mean I have actue necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis? I'm a smoker, and lately i've noticed some gray spots or residue on my lower gum. I've seen some pretty scary pictures of actue necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis, and am won

Do the gray spots on my gums mean I have actue necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis? I'm a smoker, and lately i've noticed some gray spots or residue on my lower gum. I've seen some pretty scary pictures of actue necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis, and am won

SNUG : Snug is characterized by a very foul odor that comes out of the mouth. It can be picked up from several feet away. Nevertheless, since you are a smoker, and have placed yourself in a risk category, a with a periodontist is highly recommended. www.perio.org will have a link to a periodontist near you. Best of luck, dr. Zev kaufman. ...Read more

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Dr. Scott Bolhack
2,077 doctors shared insights

Ulcer (Definition)

An ulcer is a discontinuity or a break in a body membrane that impedes the normal functioning of the organ of which that membrane is a part. Ulcers are further classified by their location. Ulcers are usually caused by infections, excessive acid production, stress, ...Read more


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How long does it take amoxicilin to get rid of acute necrotic ulcerative gingivitis?

How long does it take amoxicilin to get rid of acute necrotic ulcerative gingivitis?

Need other treatment: Amoxicillin alone won't get rid of acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis. You also need to have some professional cleanings to get rid to the bacterial toxins that are irritating your gingiva. You also need to increase your brushing and flossing habits, and possibly incorporate a waterpik in your daily regimen. ...Read more

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Best cure for acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivities?

Best cure for acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivities?

Proper Oral Hygiene: You definitely need to see a dentist. Depending on the severity you may need an extensive type of cleaning and debridement of your gums. That must be followed up with proper brushing and flossing to achieve proper oral health. ...Read more

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Dr. Dinh Bui Dr. Bui
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Does HIV cause acute necrotizing gingivitis very often?

Dr. Dinh Bui Dr. Bui
2 doctors agreed:

HIV and ANUP: Hiv patient has low immunity and thus unable to combat the local microbial activity with low host reaction. As the result, bone loss and necrotizing of the tissue seen in the chronic situation of infection. Acute necrotizing uncerative periodontitis is seen more in HIV since chronic infection will lead straight to attachment loss (periodontitis) with minimal gum inflammation (gingivitis). ...Read more

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Does amoxicillin get rid of acute necrotizing gingivitis and what causes this infection?

Does amoxicillin get rid of acute necrotizing gingivitis and what causes this infection?

See a dentist ASAP: If acute necrotising ulcerative gingivitis is left untreated, it can cause more severe oral and health complications. in case of ANUG, amoxicillin and more aggressive methods (gum surgery) may need to be necessary. ...Read more

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Dentist did laser/deep cleaning on teeth/gums. I have gum disease. Bacteria test is positive. Have stomach ulcers. Can i take align with metronizadole?

Not necessary: Align is a probiotic supplement for your digestive health. Antibiotic may kill the good bacteria and disrupt the balance of its activities. When using lanap or laser therapy, most of the time the antibiotic is an adjunctive procedure and not required. Discuss with your periodontist about not using antibiotics. Strict follow up, occlusal adjustment, and recall is what brings success to your tx. ...Read more

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Can ulcerative collitis be a genetic disease? Explain.

Can ulcerative collitis be a genetic disease? Explain.

Yes but complex: There are potentially hundreds of genes that all contribute small amounts the the susceptibility to ulcerative colitis. Additionally there are environmental factors. So there are no good "genetic tests" to determining whether you have it. The best thing to do is to see a gastroenterologist for chronic pain, diarrhea, or blood in the stool and they will do the appropriate tests. ...Read more

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Is gum disease genetic? Can our children have it if a blood family member has it?

Is gum disease genetic? Can our children have it if a blood family member has it?

Possible predisposed: Genetic predisposition is one of several contributing factors to gum disease. Bacteria ; poor oral hygiene are the major causes. Go to www.Perioprotect.Com to read about a proven non-surgical treatment system that significantly reduces bacteria in the gum pockets. ...Read more

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+ve ana, borderline+ve anti ds DNA , normal cbc, pain in some of the fingers of the hands with pressure for the last week, mouth ulcers, lower back pain?

+ve ana, borderline+ve anti ds DNA , normal cbc, pain in some of the fingers of the hands with pressure for the last week, mouth ulcers, lower back pain?

Not enough info: Ana's show false positives in a determined percentage of the population, especially females. My advice would be a more complete connective tissue workup. ...Read more

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How early can you get gingivitis? 40's? 50's?

IF you have teeth: Young children to elderly can get gingivitis any time oral hygiene is inadequate. It is simply inflamation in the gums. If you mean periodontitis then it usually comes later but it is preventable with good oral hygiene and regular visits to your dentist, see your dentist. ...Read more

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How do I treat gingivitis?

Conservatively: After a proper diagnosis by your dentist, a thorough professional cleaning is recommended. Once your teeth are squeaky clean, then meticulous home care, a healthy diet, and tobacco avoidance should allow your gums to heal to a healthy state. ...Read more

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How I can treat gingivitis?

Gingivitis: Have your teeth cleaned by a dentist every 4-6 months. Brush and floss correctly and thoroughly as directed by your dentist. ...Read more

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How do you fight gingivitis?

How do you fight gingivitis?

Floss!: Good brushing and flossing, and perhaps use of a good mouthrinse like listerine. If it is just gingivitis then this will be beneficial, but if it's progressed to a more serious form, affecting the bone, your home care will not cure the problem. ...Read more

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Is it possible to reverse gingivitis?

Yes, very easy: Gingivitis can be reverse simply by good oral hygiene in the area to remove the cause of inflammation (good brushing and flossing to remove the irritated plaque). Severe gingivitis as in the case of acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis may required antibiotic treatment with amoxicillin/metronidazole combination before full mouth debridement. ...Read more

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What should I do when you have gingivitis?

Dental prophylaxis: Seek care with a dentist. Then brush and floss your teeth daily and stay on a regular schedule of dental cleaning. ...Read more

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What are the different stages of gingivitis?

What are the different stages of gingivitis?

Gums that bleed: Gingivitis is the beginning stages, and by definition, your gums are inflamed, and you might see them bleed when you brush and floss. If this is left untreated, then the infection moves deeper into the jaw, and it progresses to the more severe, periodontal disease. ...Read more

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Gene (Definition)

A hereditary unit consisting of a sequence of dna that occupies a specific location on a chromosome and determines a particular characteristic in an organism. Genes undergo mutation when their ...Read more


Dr. Gary Sandler
703 doctors shared insights

Gum Disease (Definition)

Gun disease can range from gum swelling all the way to the bone keeping the teeth in place being lost, this can be be for a number of reasons, if you think you have gum disease please visit your ...Read more